NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS PRESS RELEASES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1939

http://home2.nyc.gov/html/records/pdf/govpub/41931939_press_releases.pdf

Corrected by Frank da Cruz, July-August 2014.

Original order preserved.
Paragraphs reformatted by recombining hyphenated words and filling to 78 cols.
Duplicate entries omitted.
Tabs converted to spaces.
Coding: ISO 8859-1 (for cent signs and fractions).

Search Terms relevant to New Deal:

Works Progress Administration
Works Progress Administrator
W.P.A.
WPA
Federal Music Project
Federal Public Works Administration
National Youth Administration
relief labor

Other interesting search terms:

Claremont Inn
Tavern on the Green
Bill Robinson

New Deal projects announced in this archive:

All year - WPA bands and orchestras performing at many events.

26 Jan 1939  Manhattan   Boat basin in the Harlem ship canal bordering Inwood
                           Hill and Isham Parks 
26 Jan 1939  Manhattan   Inwood Hill Park itself
26 Jan 1939  Manhattan   Land on Ft.Washington Ave on south edge of Ft.Tryon
                           Park to be developed by WPA 
18 Mar 1939  Brooklyn    New playground on 18th Ave btw 82nd and 83rd Streets
                           (Milestone Park) 
18 Mar 1939  Brooklyn    New playground on 10th Ave btw 42nd-43rd Streets
31 Mar 1939  Manhattan   New playground on Lenox Avenue, 139th-140th Streets
31 Mar 1939  Manhattan   New playground at Harlem Housing, 150th St & 7th Ave
19 Apr 1939  Richmond    Opening of Schmul Park, Wild and Melvin Avenues,
                           Travis 
26 May 1939  Brooklyn    New recreation area in Marine Park
26 May 1939  Brooklyn    Opening of Mount Prospect Park
26 May 1939  Manhattan   New outdoor swimming pool and playground, 23rd
                           Street and Avenue A 
10 Jun 1939  Manhattan   Renovated bath building at 35 W.134th St
10 Jun 1939  Manhattan   Renovated bath building at 232 W.60th St
10 Jun 1939  Manhattan   New outdoor swimming pool in Hudson Park, 7th Ave &
                           Clarkson St 
19 Jun 1939  Queens      New Playground in Flushing Meadow Park by Grand
                           Central Parkway south of Northern Blvd & 114th St 
19 Jun 1939  Queens      New Playground in Flushing Meadow Park by Grand
                           Central Parkway just south of Horace Harding Blvd 
23 Jun 1939  Manhattan   New recreation area on Hudson River, 145-155 Street
23 Jun 1939  Manhattan   New 20-acre recreation area in Inwood Hill Park
                           between river and train tracks north of Dyckman
                           Street 
30 Jun 1939  Queens      Opening of Marconi Memorial Field, 155 St & 108 Ave,
                           South Jamaica 
 4 Aug 1939  Queens      New playground at Braddock Ave and 240 Street,
                           Queens Village 
 4 Aug 1939  Brooklyn    New playground in Lincoln Terrace Park,
                           Carroll-Presidnt / New York Ave. 
 9 Aug 1939  Brooklyn    New playground, Atlantic & 95th Aves, 88th-90th Sts.
14 Aug 1939  Manhattan   New pedestal for Admiral Farragut statue
14 Aug 1939  Manhattan   New Tennis Center on Randall's Island, 23 courts
26 Aug 1939  Bronx       New playground, Bradford, Edison, LaSalle, &
                           Waterbury Avenues 
11 Sep 1939  Manhattan   Remodeled swimming pool, Carmine St. & 6th Ave.
11 Sep 1939  Manhattan   Remodeled swimming pool, 408 W 28th St.
11 Sep 1939  Manhattan   Remodeled swimming pool, 324 E 54th St.
11 Sep 1939  Brooklyn    Remodeled swimming pool, Metropolitan & Bedford Aves
17 Sep 1939  Bronx       New playground, Bronx Park East, Waring Ave - Thwaite Place
22 Sep 1939  Bronx       Opening of Van Cortlandt Stadium.
 8 Oct 1939  Brooklyn    New playground, Douglass, DeGraw & Nevins Sts, 3rd Ave
11 Oct 1939  Bronx       Reconstructed and enlarged Pulaski Park, 133rd St &
                           Willis Ave 
31 Oct 1939  Bronx       New playground at Bronx Park East and Reiss Place
31 Oct 1939  Queens      New playground at 30th Road and 45th Street
31 Oct 1939  Queens      New playground at Atlantic Avenue and 125th Street
 4 Dec 1939  Bronx       New playground in Hines Park, Fulton Ave & E.167th St.
 4 Dec 1939  Bronx       New playground at Watson, Gleason, and Rosedale Aves.
 4 Dec 1939  Bronx       New playground at East 177th Street and Noble Avenue.

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1/15/39  - 839 - Bids received for 8th contract on Belt (Circumferential)
                 Pkway. Work is construction of 3 bridges for grade
                 separation near Queens approach to Bronx-fthitestone
                 Bridge.  

1/20/39  - 840 - Bids received for construction of grade separation
                 structure at Hillside Ave. on Cross Island section of Belt
                 Pkway.

1/25/39  - 841 - Negotiations completed with John D. Rockefeller, Jr. for
                 transfer of tract of land adjacent to southerly boundary of
                 Ft. Tryon Park. Resume of work accomplished in Washington
                 Heights section.

2/10/39  - 842 - Letter to Deputy Mayor Curran on plan for reconstruction of
                 City Hall Park.

2/15/39  - 843 - Hiking trails in city parks. Description.

2/16/39  - 844 - Budget request for 1939-1940

2/24/39  - 845 - 11th Contract on Belt Pkway. Grading and paving of portion
                 of Cross Island Pkway. between Hillside Ave. to 91st Ave.

2/26/39  - 846 - Application for permits for golf and tennis received. List
                 of golf courses and tennis courts.

3/3/39   - 847 - 12th Contract of Belt Parkway. Paving od Cross Island
                 Pkway. at intersection with Bronx-Whitestone Pkway.

3/3/39   - 848 - Bronx Playgrounds Operetta & Orchestral Clubs present "The
                 Mikado"

3/5/39   - 849 - Permit for planting of 8 Elm trees along West side of 5th
                 Ave. from 49th to 51 Sts.

3/10/39  - 850 - 15th Contract on Belt Pkway. Construiction of Cross Island
                 Pkway from Hempstead Turnpike to Linden Blvd.

3/13/39  - 851 - 14th Contract on Belt Pkway. Grading of Southern
                 Pkway. section and paving of Worth Service Rd. between
                 Baisley Blvd. and Rockaway Branch of L.I. R.R.

3/18/39  - 852 - Completion & opening of 2 new playgrounds in Brooklyn, 1 at
                 10th Ave. & 42nd St., the other at 13th Ave., bet. 82nd &
                 33rd Sts.

3/21/39  - 853 - Memo to Mr. Moses on Battery-Brooklyn Bridge & Battery Pk.
                 from Mr. Jennings, Mr. Embury & Mr. Clarke.

3/21/39  - 854 - 15th Contract on Belt Pkway. Construction of 3 bridges
                 located at 160th St., Utopia Pkway. & Cross Island Blvd. on
                 Cross Island section.

3/22/39  - 855 - 16th Contract on Belt Pkway. Construction of 3 bridges for
                 grade separations on Cross Island Pkway. on main line of
                 L. I. R. R., at Belmont Spur of L. I. R. R. and at Superior
                 Rd. and paving of the parkway between Jamaica Ave. &
                 Hempstead Ave. 

3/23/39  - 856 - Board of Estimate to consider laying out park at Rivington
                 St. West of Margin St.   City Council requested to change
                 name of Goerick st. to Baruch St. 

3/27/39  - 857 - 16th, 17th, 13th & 19th Contracts on Belt Pkway. Grading of
                 Cross Island Pkway. from 41st Ave. through Alley Pond
                 Pk. to Grand Central Pkway. & paving the Parkway between
                 46th Ave. & same terminus.

3/26/39  - 858 - Bids opened for erection of signs for Belt Parkway.

3/29/39  - 859 - Park & Police Depts., Manhattan Borough President & Board of
                 Transportation cooperate for rehabilitation of Greeley &
                 Herald Squares

3/29/39  - 860 - 20th Contract on Belt Pkway. Construction of Cross Island
                 Pkway. from Stewart Ave. to 104th Ave. including a grade
                 separation structure at Hempstead Ave. 

3/31/39  - 861 - Opening of 2 playgrounds in Manhattan, 1 at 150th St. & 7th
                 Ave., other at 139th St. & Lenox Ave.

3/31/39  - 862 - Bids opened for construction of 2 of 5 bridges at
                 intersection of Cross-Island Pkway. with Grand Central
                 Parkway.

3/31/39  - 863 - Final span of westerly roadway of Cross Bay Parkway Bridge
                 connecting Broad Channel with the Rockaways set in place.

4/1/39   - 863B- Band selection

4/2/39   - 864 - Golf courses to open on April 8th. Clay tennis courts on
                 April 15th

4/3/39   - 864a- Letter to G. Whalen from R.M. re signs on Billy Rose's
                 Aquacade.

4/6/39   - 865 - Easter Flower Show at Prospect Park, Brooklyn

4/7/39   - 866 - Correspondence between Board of Education & Dept. of
                 Parks on vandalism in parks.

4/4/39   - 867 - L.I. State Park Commission Release on fishing.

4/11/39  - 868 - Bids for planting on Grand Central Parkvray between 84-94
                 St. adjoining North Beach Airport.

4/13/39  - 869 - Children spring planting in individual garden
                 plots. Locations in 5 Boroughs.

4/13/39  - 870 - Reopening of Claremont Inn on 4/8/39. List of prices.

4/13/39  - 869a- Close of swimming pools as play centers. To reopen 5/27/39.

4/19/39  - 871 - Opening of Schmul Park, unveiling of plaque.

4/20/39  - 872 - City officials at preview of N.Y.C. Bldg at World's Fair,
                 Long description & comments of officials.

4/21/39  - 873 - 23rd contract on Belt Parkway. Construction of a portion of
                 Shore Pkway from Bay Parkway to Bay 49th St. Includes grade
                 separation structure at Bay Parkway & 26 Ave.

4/24/39  - 874 - Delay in delivery of material making it neccessary to
                 postpone opening of playground at Atlantic Ave. & 88 St.,
                 Queens.

4/24/39  - 875 - Pitch & putt golf, course at Jacob Riis Park will open on
                 Sat.4/29. Activities at games area - 10˘ fee per half hour.

4/25/39  - 875a- Release to Westchester County Newspapers re routes to
                 World's Fair for Westchester County Motorists (best routes)
                                                                              /
4/26/39  - 876 - Reopening of Tavern on Green, Central Park on 4/28. List
                 of prices. 

4/26/39  - 877 - Areas in 5 Boroughs for Kite Plying.

4/27/39  - 878 - Bids, 5 bridges for Belt Parkway. Substructure over Mill
                 Basin on Shore Parkway; 4 bridges on Southern Parkway at
                 150 St., Van Wyck Blvd., 130 St. & Lefferts Boulevard.

4/28/39  - 879 - 26th contract Belt Pkway. Paving 1 section of Cross Island
                 Pkway from its intersection with Bronx-Whitestone Parkway
                 to 39 Ave., Queens

5/1/39  -  880 - Bids Belt Pkway, Cross Island Parkway from Hillside Ave. to
                 Grand Central Parkway including grade separation structure
                 at Union Turnpike 

5/2/39  -  881 - Landing floats provided by Park Dept. for visit of fleet in
                 Hudson.

5/12/39  - 882 - 28th contract, Belt Pkway. Paving of Shore Parkway from
                 Flatbush Ave. to Pennsylvania Ave. (about 3˝ miles)
                 includes construction of a 4 span steel structure supported
                 on steel piles to carry Shore Parkway traffic over Rockaway
                 Avenue.

5/13/39  - 883 - Completion of erection of Vanderbilt Gates at Conservatory
                 Gardens at 105 St. & Fifth Ave.

5/15/39  - 884 - 5 page release on last issue of Flushing Meadow booklet re
                 Basic Improvements. Descriptive.

5/19/39  - 885 - 2nd Amateur Photographic contest "Youth & Age in Our City
                 Parks & Pldgs" begins 5/20 closes 9/20. Description, age
                 groups.

5/19/39  - 885 - Model Sail & Motor Boat Races at Central Park. Classes &
                 prizes. 

5/23/39  - 887 - Finals of marble contest.

x/xx/xx  - 888 - (Number skipped)

5/25/39  - 889 - "Learn to Swim" Campaign. List of places, etc.

5/24/39  - 890 - Letter to Hon. F. H. LaGuardia from R.Moses re Council
                 reducing Park Dept Budget for 1939-40

5/26/39  - 891 - Reopening of 12 outdoor swimming pools & Floating Baths on
                 5/27/39. Fees & hours of opening. 

5/26/39  - 892 - Manhattan Annual Athletic Meet for Boys & Girls at 74 St.&
                 Riverside

5/26/39  - 893 - 30th contract Belt Parkway. Construction of a viaduct from
                 Stillwell Ave. to Shell Rd. & for grading & paving of Shore
                 & Southern Pkways from Pennsulvania Ave. to
                 Baisley. Blvd. (Crosses over right of way & tracks of Sea
                 Beach Line & West End Line & etc.) 

5/27/39  - 894 - Release on opening of 23rd-St. outdoor pool & Mt. Prospect
                 Park in Brooklyn. Copies of programs. 

5/27/39  - 894A- Opening of Marine Park Playground

5/28/39  - 895 - Naumberg Concert on Mall, Central Park. First of series of 4. 

5/29/39  - 896 - Programs in playgrounds for Memorial Day. 

5/31/39  - 897 - Locations of free public dancing in 5 Boroughs.

6/2/39   - 898 - Summer Recreational Program for pldgs. Detailed plans for
                 summer.

6/2/39   - 898a- Opening of Cross Bay (Rockaway) ceremonies, description &
                 booklet.  10˘ fee.

6/3/39   - 898b- Rockaway improvement project, Shorefront Parkway.

5/5/39   - 899 - Removal of tree guards with memorial tablets - reasons for.

6/6/39   - 900 - 31st & 32nd contract Belt Pkway - Shore Pkway for paving
                 Emmons Avenue, through Marine Park to Flatbush
                 Ave. includes erection of superstructure of Plumb Beach
                 Channel Bridge. Grade separation structure on Cross Island
                 Pkway.

6/7/39   - 901 - 33rd construction contract of Belt Pkway between Owl's Head
                 Park & Fort Hamilton. 2 pedestrian bridges included.

6/9/39   - 902 - Bids Belt Pkway. Grade separation structure at Braddock
                 Ave. & at Jamaica Ave on Cross Island Parkway.

6/9/39   - 903 - Dance Festival at Sheep Meadow in Central Park on
                 6/10. List of plgds competing and judges.

6/10/39  - 904 - Opening of new outdoor swimming-pool in Hudson Park (Carmine
                 St. Program of ceremonies.

6/15/39  - 905 - Annual City-Wide Athletic Meet at Red Hook,6/17. List of
                 events.

6/12/39  - 906 - Bids-Belt Pkway. Cross Island Pkwayfrom Linden Blvd. to 129
                 Ave. together with grade separation structure at
                 intersection of Cross Island Pkway with Laurelton &
                 Southern State Pkways.

6/13/39  - 907 - Birth of baby seal to Splashy, father Barker.

6/15/39  - 908 - 15 new greens at Clearview Golf Course will open 6/17/39

6/15/39  - 909 - Birth of another baby seal to Waterlily, father Barker.

6/15/39  - 909A- Annual City-Wide Athletic Meet, Red Hook Stadium.

6/17/39  - 910 - N.Y.C. Pkway Authority - no of cars using Cross Bay Pkway
                 in first 2 weeks of operation.

6/19/39  - 911 - Opening of 2 pldgs- in Flushing Meadow Park. List of
                 facilities. Opening ceremonies.

6/19/39  - 912 - 35th contract- Belt Pkway - construction on Southern Pkway
                 between  Baisley Blvd. & 159 St.

6/22/39  - 913 - Finals of. 1 Act plays at Mullaly Pldg., Bronx. Detailed,
                 names of plays & pldgs competing. 

6/23/39  - 914 - 3000 children registered for "Learn to Swim" campaign.

6/23/39  - 915 - 2 recreational areas opened - 1 from 145 St. to 155 St. &
                 Hudson River and the other, Inwood Hill Park. Description.

6/23/39  - 915A- Opening of playground, 145th St & Hudson River

6/26/39  - 916 - Bids Belt Pkway construction of 3 bridges - l) West Alley Rd. 
                 2) Grand Central Pkway 3) Winchester Blvd & Grand Central
                 Pkway.
                                                            o
6/27/39  - 917 - "Swim for Health" Finals transferred from Highbridge Pool
                 to Astoria Pool on Frfday 6/30/39.

6/27/39  - 918 - Bids grading & paving of Shore Fkway from Cropsey Ave. to
                 Stillwell Ave. & from Shell Road to Coney Island including
                 a grade separation structure at Cropsey Ave. 

6/27/39  - 919 - Concert by All-City High School Band on Mall,Central Park
                 6/28/39 at 8:30 P.M. Final one of season. 


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 30, 1939

                     At the meeting on May 6, 1938, the Board of Estimate
made funds available for the purchase of materials and rental of construction
equipment for the alteration of four of the nine public bath buildings
transferred from the jurisdiction of the Borough President of Manhattan to
the Park Department.

                     Two of these, 409 West 28 Street and 342 East 54 Street,
have been completed and will be opened to the public on Saturday, July 1. The
other two, Bast 23 Street and Avenue A and 232 West 60 Street were opened on
June 10.

                     The building at 28 Street opposite Chelsea Park, which
originally included a gymnasium, was changed so that the second floor,
formerly used for public baths, was converted into a recreation room provided
with a removeable stage.

                     The 54 Street building, originally containing two
separate pools - one for women and one for men, both of which were too small
to be of any real use, have been reconstructed to provide one large pool
sufficiently deep to permit diving at one end, A play area has been provided
on the roof of the building.

                     In each of those structures, the plumbing, electrical,
heating and ventilating systems were thoroughly overhauled and cleansing
baths for itinerants or those still residing in cold water flats were
provided separate from the pool.

                     These improvements, done with relief labor under the
Works Progress Administration and by the Department of Parks, not only
provide the advantages of modern swimming pools, but also recreation
facilities that have long been denied to the residents of the surrounding
neighborhood, and for which there has been an increased demand.

                     The facilities at both locations will be opened to the
general public daily from 7 A.M. to 10 P.M. except that the pools will be
closed on Sundays so that they can be emptied and the tilod pool thoroughly
cleaned.  The cleansing baths will close at 18 Noon on Sundays.

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                         HIKING TRAILS IN CITY PARKS


          There are no designated hiking trails in City Parks, however, there
are many excellent walks to attract the hiker. These walks and paths are
located as follows:

[WIDE TABLE OMITTED, SEE PDF]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 30, 1939

               The Departaent of Parks is conducting a party of 29 Michigan
state officials and citizens, representing the Huron-Clinton Parkway
Committee, on a two-day tour (June 30 and July l) of the New York City,
Westchester and Long Island Park Systems.

               This committee has sponsored state legislation which has been
passed and signed by the Governor of Michigan, which provides for the
incorporation of the Huron-Clinton Metropolitan Authority to permit the
Counties of Wayne, Washtenaw, Livingston, Oakland and MacComb in Michigan to
join in a Metropolitan District for planning, promoting, and acquiring,
constructing, owning, developing, maintain- ing and operating parks and
parkways.

                Attached is a list of names of those comprising the group and
copies of the itinerary.

June 30, 1939

PRESS

    Mr. Lou Tendler, The Detroit News, Detroit.

    Mr. Whalesby, The Detroit Times, Detroit.


CITY OF DETROIT

    Mr. Henry W, Busch, Commissioner of Parks & Boulevards
              900 Water Board Bldg., Detroit.

    Mr. Herbert Russell, City Planner & Secretary, City Plan
              Commission, 1700 Water Board Building, Detroit.

DETROIT AUTOMOBILE CLUB

    Mr. Charles T. Bush, Director, % C. A. Strelinger Co., Detroit

     Col. Sidney D, Waldon, Director, 4612 Woodward Ave., Detroit.

    Mr. Richard Harfst, General Manager, 139 Bagley St., Detroit.

    Mr. William J. Trepagnier, Editor, Motor News, Detroit.

CHRYSLER CORPORATION

    Mr, James Lee, Director of Public Relations, Chrysler Corporation

GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION

     Mr. Paul Garrett, Director of Public Relations

AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION

     Mr. Richard Tupper, Director of Public Relations,
                  Pennsylvania & 17th Sts,
                       Washington, D. C.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS-WAYNE COUNTY

        Mr. William F. Von Moll, Supervisor, Trenton, Michigan.
                  Representing the Out-County Supervisors.

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                                 THE HURON-CLINTON
                                 PARKWAY COMMITTEE

                       THE FOLLOWING IS THE GROUP THAT IS GOING
                       TO NEW YORK TO MAKE AN INSPECTION OP THE
                                PARKS AND PARKWAYS


HURON-CLINTON P/W COMMITTEE MEMBERS

      Mr. Harry B. Earhart, 3965 Penobscot Bldg,, Detroit.

      Mr. Leroy C. Smith (Wayne County Highway Engineer)
                         Director - Wayne County Parks)
            3800 Barlum Tower, Detroit.

      Mr. Luther D. Allen, Member Board of Oakland County Road Commission,
             Pontiac, Michigan

      Prof. H. O. Whittemore, Landscape, Parks & Playgrounds Dept.,
             University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, Michigan.

      Mr. Robert L« McNamee, Engineering, State Bank Bldg., Ann Arbor,
             Michigan.

      Col. Sidney D. Waldon, 4612 Woodward Ave., Detroit.

      Mr. Arthur Stace, c/o The Ann Arbor News, Ann Arbor, Michigan

WAYNE COUNTY PARK TRUSTEES

      Mr. Michael Jt O'Brien, Chairman, 3800 Barium Tower, Detroit.

      Mr. Charles L. Wilson, Secretary, 3800 Barium Tower, Detroit.

      Mr. John F. Breining, Trustee, 3800 Barium Tower, Detroit.

      Mr# Joseph W , Gross, Ass't Seoretary, 3800 Barium Tower, Detroit.

      Mr. J. M. Bennett, Superintendent, 3800 Barium Tower, Detroit.

OAKLAND COUNTY ROAD COMMISSION

      Mr. Lee 0. Brooks, Chairman, 550 Telegraph Road, Pontiac, Mich.

      Mr. John A. Bradley, Member, 550 Telegraph Road, Pontiac, Mich.

      Mr. Leon V. Belknap, County Highway Engineer, Pontiac, Mich.

BOARD OF COMMERCE - Detroit

      Mr. James Vernor, Jr«, Vice-President, 320 W, Lafayette, Detroit.

      Mr. Harvey Campbell., Secretary, 320 W, Lafayette, Detroit.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 28, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that the All-City High School
Band, conducted by Mr. Albert A. Becker, will give the final concert of the
season on the Mall, Central Park, Wednesday, June 28th at 8:30 P.M.

             The band is composed of 94 students selected from all the high
schools of New York City, and is part of the extra-curricular program of
the Music Department of the Board of Education.

             During the past season the band made several public appearances,
including two winter concerts and two appearances at the World's Fair.

             The program for the concert on Wednesday night is as follows:

             "Star Spangled Banner"

             Overture - "Morning, Noon and Night"

             March - "Laurentian"

             Selection - "Waltz Dream"

             Descriptive - "The Whistler and His Dog"

             "Procession of the Knights" - Parsifal

             March - "The Pride of the Marines"

             "Pan Americana"

             "Pizzicato Polka"

             "Children's March' - Goldman

             "On the Mall" - Goldman

             "The Spirit of Pageantry" - Fletcher

             "God Bless America"

             "America"

             All musical programs of the All-City High School Band are given
under the supervision of George T. Gartlan, Director of Music, Board of
Education, New York City.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 27, 1939

                  Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for grading and paving of Shore Parkway from Cropsey Avenue to
Stillwell Avenue and from Shell Road to Coney Island Avenue, together with a
grade separation structure at Cropsey Avenue.

                  Between Stillwell Avenue and Shell Road a steel viaduct is
now being erected under another contract.

                  The bridge at Cropsey Avenue is a two-span steel structure
supported by concrete filled steel pipe columns at the center and by concrete
and stone faced abutments at the ends.

                    To date contracts totaling $19,273,689 or 77% of the
entire Belt Parkway have been let since this project was approved on October
13, 1938.

                   The three low bidders were:

                   Ross G-alvanizing Works
                   395 Kent Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y.             $683,955.00

                   Reiss & Weinsier, Inc.
                   105 Court Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.             707,805.00

                    B. Turecamo Contracting Co.
                    Foot of 24th Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y.         720,912.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 26, 1939


             Bids on a contract for the construction of three more bridges on
the Belt Parkway were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal.

             These bridges are on the Cross Island Parkway section and
provide for grade separations at West Alley Road, at Grand Central Parkway,
and at Winchester Boulevard and Grand Central Parkway.

             These bridges, together with three other bridges at this point
which are already under contract will provide for a complete separation of
grades at the intersection of Cross Island Parkway, Grand Central Parkway and
Winchester Boulevard in addition to carrying West Alley Road traffic over
Cross Island Parkway.

             To date contracts have been let for fifty of the sixty-three
bridges required on the Belt Parkway since the project was approved on
October 13, 1938.

             The three low bidders were:

             Candeloro Construction Corporation               $453,703.00
             55 West 42nd Street, N.Y.C.

             Reiss and Weinseir Inc#                           485,774.50
             105 Court Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

             Highway Improvement & Repair Company              491,519.40
             125 Barclay Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF BRIDGE BIDS ANNOUNCMENT]

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[ANOTHER DUPLICATE COPY OF BRIDGE BIDS ANNOUNCMENT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 23, 1939


                        The Department of Parks announces that on Friday,
June 23, two more recreation areas in Manhattan were opened to the public,
one from 145 Street to 155 Street and the Hudson River, and the other in
Inwood Hill Park, north of Dyckman Street between the Hudson River and the
New York Central Railroad tracks.

                        These two recreational areas mark another step in the
park development of the Washington Heights-Inwood Section of Northern
Manhattan, which makes it one of the few neighborhoods in the City which is
properly planned and developed from a scenic and recreational standpoint.

                        At the 145 Street location, the ceremonies took place
at 3:30 P.M. with Park Commissioner Robert Moses presiding.  Besides
Mr. Moses, Mrs.  J. J. Rooney of the Washington Heights Playground
Conference, Alexander MacGregor, Assistant to the Works Progress
Administrator, Borough President Stanley M. Isaacs of Manhattan,
participated.  After the speaking exercises, there was a program of
recreational activities and a baseball game inaugurating the opening of the
area which includes ten double handball, seven paddle tennis, one basketball,
thirteen shuffleboard and fifteen horseshoe pitching courts, a roller skating
mall, a soft baseball field, a completely equipped playground and a
pedestrian promenade.

                        A boat basin is planned from 149 to 150 Streets where
smaller craft in the flotilla of pleasure boats, the outboards, the open
inboard runa- bouts and even the sailing power and paddle canoes will be
served and housed.  Inside the bulkheading will be six floats for this type
of craft, and provision outside the bulkheading for the mooring of cruisers.

                        This area from 145 to 155 Streets was transferred, by
action of the Board of Estimate, from the Department of Docks to the
Department of Parks on October 13, 1938.

                   Upon the completion of the 145 Street program, the
official party made an inspection of the Inwood Hill Park area.  Here, the
former unattractive riverside dump, north of Dyckman Street and west of the
New York Central Railroad tracks, has been converted into a 20-acre
recreation area containing two full-sized hardball diamonds and two junior
ball diamonds.  In the north end, an archery range is planned.  Paralleling
the river front is a wide promenade.  A footbridge over the railroad and
parkway underpass permits visitors in the upper part of Inwood Hill to reach
this waterfront area expeditiously.  The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority
contributed largely to this development not only by extensive landscaping on
the adjacent parkway, but also by making a sponsor's contribution to the
W.P.A. to aid them in reclaiming this land into a recreation area.

                   Both these improvements are landscaped with trees and
shrubbery and benches have been placed to provide rest and a view of the
river.

                   The work was planned by the Park Department and performed
by the Works Progress Administration.

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                                   PROGRAM
                                      
                            OPENING OF PLAYGROUND

                         145 Street and Hudson River
                                  Manhattan

                                June 23, 1939

                                   3:30 P.M.




Band Selections

Honorable Robert Moses, Commissioner, Department of Parks
          - Chairman

Mrs. J. J, Roonoy, Washington Heights Playground Conference

Alexander MacGregor, Assistant to Works Progress Administrator

Honorable Stanley M, Isaacs, President, Borough of Manhattan

National Anthem

Baseball Game

Playground Activities

Inspection of Inwood Hill Recreation Area

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 23, 1939


                       The Department of Parks announces that up to date
close to 3000 boys and girls have registered for the "Learn to Swim" campaign
being conducted in the municipal swimming pools.

                       The children are broken up into small groups and after
being given land drills in which they are shown the correct arm movements,
they are taken into the pool for lessons in floating, elementary crawl and
backstroke.  These lessons are given under the tutelage of capable pool
operators, and it is thought that about 90% of the group will be able to swim
at the end of the campaign which is June 26th. Adults are also taking
advantage of this "Learn to Swim" campaign, and about 500 have registered so
far.

                       The Department of Parks is cooperating in the "Swim
for Health" campaign from June 26 to July 1. During the week, eliminations
will be held at the various pools to decide the make-up of teams to represent
the pools in the City-wide championships which will culminate "Swim for
Health" week.

                       Medals for the competitors placing first, second and
third in each event will bo awarded by the "Swim for Health" Association, and
a cup will be given to the members of the team that scores the most
points. The meets will be held at Highbridge Swimming Pool, 173 Street and
Amsterdam Avenue, Friday afternoon, Juno 30, at 1 o'clock.

                       The Department of Parks also announces that the free
period for children under 14 years of ago from 10 A.1I, to 12 Noon on
weekdays has been extended in all the municipal swimming pools to include
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. This is offective this coming Saturday, June
24th.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 22, 1939


                The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
One-Act Play Contest for the children of Park Department playgrounds will
take place Saturday, June 24, at 2:00 P.M. at Mullaly Playground, 162 Street
and River Avenue, Bronx.

                Numerous plays were reviewed by the board of judges during
the elimination held in each of the five boroughs. The
following plays were selected for the finals: "Pandora", Jackson
Heights Playground, Queens; "The Beggar Maid", Zimmerman Playground,
Bronx; "Three Pills in a Bottle", Hoosevelt Playground, Manhattan;
"Nimble Wit and Fingerkin", McDonald Playground, Richmond.

                The persons who have consented to act as judges at the finals
on June 24 are as follows: Mrs. Mabel Hobbs, author and dramatic teacher,
Mr. Clark Frederickson, National Recreation Association, and Mr. James
A. McKague, dramatic coach.

                Plaques vail be awarded to the playground children who
put on the three best plays.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 19, 1939


                    Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks for the
construction of another section of the Belt Parkway on Southern Parkway
between Baisley Boulevard and 159th Street.

                    This contract provides for the paving of the Parkway and
the north and south service roads between the limits mentioned and the
widening of the existing bridge at Rockaway Boulevard.

                    The existing structure which is now 42 feet wide between
curbs will be widened to accommodate six lanes of traffic separated by a five
foot center mall with a nine foot sidewalk on its north side. The completed
structure will carry the Parkway traffic over Rockaway Boulevard.

                    To date, thirty-six contracts have been let for the
construction of the Belt Parkway since this project was approved on October
13, 1938 for a total of $18,135,000. or 72% of the total cost.

                    The work under this contract is to be completed on or
before December 30, 1939.

                    The three low bidders were:

Petracca & Banko
6919 Queens Blvd, Winfield, L.I.                  $392,818.50

Lieb Construction Co.
415 Lexington Ave., N.Y.C.                        $411,568.00

William P. McDonald
33-15 Lawrence St., Flushing, L.I.                $426,370.00


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[DUPLICATE COPY OF BIDS OPENED ANNOUNCEMENT FOR BELT PARKWAY]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 19, 1939


              The Park Department announces the opening of two playgrounds in
Flushing Meadow Park adjacent to the Grand Central Parkway, one just south
of Horace Harding Boulevard and the other south of Northern Boulevard on
114th Street.

              On Monday, June 19th at 4 P.M. ceremonies in connection with
the opening will be held at the latter location. Commissioner Moses of
the Department of Parks will act as Chairman, and Colonel Brehon Somervell,
Works Progress Administrator, Borough President Harvey of Queens, and
Mayor La Guardia will participate as speakers.

              These two recreation areas are part of the plan for the
ultimate development of the park after the Fair is over and will provide
recreation facilities for the present children of the adjacent communities
and for an increase in population as additional housing develops around the
park.

               In. the playground near Horace Harding Boulevard there is a
comfort station, twelve shuffleboard, one basketball and ten handball courts,
a Softball diamond, a sand pit, a shower basin, and a completely equipped
playground including apparatus for those of kindergarten age.

               In the playground on 114th Street just south of Northern
Boulevard, there is also a comfort station, wading pool, a sand pit, two
softball diamonds, four handball courts and a complete installation of play
apparatus.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 17, 1939


         During the first two weeks of its operation 818,847 cars used
the new Cross Bay Parkway Bridge linking the Rockaways with the main
traffic arteries and parkway system in Queens. Toll collections amounted
to $22,514.35.

         The new and improved traffic facility opened on Saturday, June 3
drew 99,262 cars during its first week of toll operation and the volume
increased in its second week, ending Friday, June 16, to 119,585, or a total
of 218,847 for the two week period, according to the traffic count announced
by the New York City Parkway Authority.

         There appeared to be every indication that despite the establishment
of a toll (10˘ on the Cross Bay span, the popularity of this route to the
Rockaways is not only being maintained but even increased.

         The widened viaduct roadways, the parkway plaza approach and
shorefront park and drive in the Rockaways, all part of the Rockaway
Improvement undertaken by the Parkway Authority are expected to draw a record
volume of Summer visitors to the Rockaways.

         While traffic and revenue on the improved Cross Bay route gratified
the Parkway Authority, equally satisfying was the increase in traffic over
the Marine Parkway Bridge which connects the Rockaways with Brooklyn.

         With its toll reduced to 10˘, coincident with the opening of the
new Cross Bay Parkway Bridge, the Marine Parkway Bridge carried 134,276
cars during the two week period ending June 16, as compared with 84,909
carried during the same period in 1938, an increase of nearly 50 per cent.

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF CROSS BAY PARKWAY BRIDGE FIRST 2 WEEKS REPORT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 15, 1939


          The Department of Parks announces that the Annual City-Wide Athletic
Meet for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds will take place at Red
Hook Stadium, foot of Henry Street and Gowanus Bay, Brooklyn, Saturday,
June 17th, at 2:00 P. M.                                     \

          During the month of May, each playground held preliminary contests
and practice sessions in preparation for the borough-wide meet which was
conducted in each of the five boroughs. The five who qualified in the finals
of the 18 track and field events of the various borough meets are eligible to
compete at the City-Wide Meet on Saturday.

          It is expected that about 500 boys and girls of various
classifications, ranging from the 85 lbs. class to the unlimited class, will
participate in the meet at Red Hook Stadium.

          All the competitors have demonstrated their superior athletic
ability by qualifying in the various borough meets. In addition, they have
been thoroughly trained in the fine points of dashing, long distance running,
baton passing, broad jumping and high jumping.

          With this background of experience and preparation, the expected
larga crowd of spectators, anxious to have their native borough boys and
girls carry off the palm of victory, can look forward to a day full of
surprises and keen competition.

          Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to those who place
1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively in each event.

          The list of events for the City-Wide Playground Meet on Saturday,
June 17th, at Red Hook Stadium, is as follows:

                                   EVENTS

Boys
85 lb. class   100 lb« class        120 lb. class            Unlimited class
50 yard dash    60 yard dash        70 yard dash              100 yard dash
Potato Race     200 yard relay      440 yard relay            880 yard relay
                Standing Broad Jump Running High Jump         Half Mile Run

Girls
85 lb. class             110 lb. class             Unlimited
40 yard dash             50 yard dash              60 yard dash
Potato Race                                        Basketball Throw
Egg and Spoon Race

                                 Unlimited

               SENIOR BOYS & GIRLS MIXED RELAY -440 YARDS

                        2 girls to run 55 yards each
                        1 boy to run 110 yards
                        1 boy to run 220 yards

         The Park Department Band will provide music for the meet.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 15, 1939

      At 12:00 a.m. June 15th. another baby seal was born at Central Park
Zoo. Father is "Barker" and Mother "Waterlily". Baby seal weighs eight pounds
and is 10 inches long. Both the new youngster and the calf born on June 12th
are doing splendidly. Photographs can be taken iransdiately.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 15, 1939


            The Department of Parks announces that the fifteen new greens at
Clearview Golf Course will be open for play on Saturday morning, June 17th,
for week ends.  As the grass is still tender they will not be open for week
day play at this time.  When the condition of the greens warrant, they will
be opened for week day play.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 13, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces the birth of a
baby seal at the Central Park Zoo.

              At 11:50 P.M. June 12th, Splashy, one of the three
cow seals in the seal pool, gave birth to a ten pound offspring.

              The father of the new animal is Bull Barker, who along
with Splashy produced a calf last June.

              Photographs may be taken at any time.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 12, 1939


                          Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks,
at the Arsenal, for the construction of another section of Cross Island
Parkway from Linden Boulevard to 129th Avenue, together with a grade
separation structure at the intersection of Cross Island Parkway with
Laurelton and Southern State Parkways.

                          This structure, a single span stonefaced bridge,
together with its connecting access drives will provide for an uninterrupted
flow of traffic to and from Cross Island Parkway and the existing Southern
State and Laurelton Parkways.

                          This contract also provides for the grading and
paving of Cross Island Parkway between the limits mentioned above.

                          To date construction contracts let for the
construction of the Belt Parkway system since the project was approved on
October 13, 1938 amount to $17,743,000 or 70% of the total cost.

                          The work under this contract is to be completed on
or before December 30, 1939.

                          The three low bidders were:

Tully and DiNapoli
30-11 18th Street, Astoria, L. I.          $413,431.55

Petracca & Banko
6919 Queens Blvd. L. I.                     418,360.50

Johnson, Drake & Piper                      437,100.00
Freeport, L. I.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 15, 1939


          The Department of Parks announces that the Annual City-Wide
Athletic Meet for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds will take
place at Red Hook Stadium, foot of Henry Street and Gowanus Bay, Brooklyn,
Saturday, June 17th, at 2:00 P. M.

          During the month of May, each playground held preliminary contests
and practice sessions in preparation for the borough-wide meet which was
conducted in each of the five boroughs. The five who qualified in the finals
of the 18 track and field events of the various borough meets are eligible to
compete at the City-Wide Meet on Saturday.

         It is expected that about 500 boys and girls of various
classifications, ranging from the 85 lbs. class to the unlimited class, will
participate in the meet at Red Hook Stadium.

         All the competitors have demonstrated their superior athletic
ability by qualifying in the various borough meets. In addition, they have
been thoroughly trained in the fine points of dashing, long distance running,
baton passing, broad jumping and high jumping.

         With this background of experience and preparation, the expected
large crowd of spectators, anxious to have their native borough boys and
girls carry off the palm of victory, can look forward to a day full of
surprises and keen competition.

          Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to those who place
1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively in each event.

         The list of events for the City-Wide Playground Meet on Saturday,
June 17th, at Red Hook Stadium, is as follows:

                                   EVENTS

Boys

85 lb. class    100 lb. class          120 lb. class          Unlimited class
50 yard dash     60 yard dash          70 yard dash            100 yard dash
Potato Race      200 yard relay        440 yard relay          880 yard relay
                 Standing Broad Jump   Running High Jump       Half Mile Run
Girls

85 lb. class             110 lb. class             Unlimited
40 yard dash             50 yard dash              60 yard dash
Potato Race                                        Basketball Throw
Egg and Spoon Race

                                 Unlimited

                  SENIOR BOYS & GIRLS MIXED RELAY -440 YARDS
                       2 girla to run 55 yards each
                       1 boy to run 110 yards
                       1 boy to run 880 yards

      The Park Dapartment Band will provide music for the meet.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1939


                  On Saturday, June 10, at 10:30 A.M., exercises will be held
in connection with the formal opening of the new outdoor swimming pool in
Hudson Park, Seventh Avenue and Clarkson Street, Manhattan.

                  Besides Hon. Robert Moses, Coimissioner of Parks, who will
act as Chairman, Philip Kumner, a neighborhood youngster, Mr. Joseph
K. Guerin, President of the Greenwich Village Association, Mrs. Mary
K. Simkhovitch, Director of Greenwich House, the Right Reverend Monsignor
John J. Hickey, Pastor of St.  Joseph's Church, Alexander MacGregor of the
Works Progress Administration, and the Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs, Borough
President of Manhattan, will participate.  Mr. Isaacs will attend as Mayor La
Guardia's representative.

                  Upon the conclusion of the speeches; as part of the
program, there will be an aquatic show featuring dhildren developed and
trained in other pools under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks.

                  The new outdoor pool is 50' x 100' with a diving pool 50' x
26' and will provide much needed bathing facilities for this congested
section of Manhattan,

                  The adjacent bath building, transferred from the Borough
President of Manhattan under the new City Charter, has been completely
renovated to provide increased recreational facilities. Besides containing
men and women's locker and shower rooms and comfort stations, it also houses
on the second floor a large gymnasium and large play room. On the mezzanine
floor there is a running track, while on the roof of the building there is a
large fenced-in play area.

                  The pool will be operated the same as all others under the
jurisdiction of the Department of Parks. On weekdays from 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.,
there is a free period for children undor 14 years of age in the swimming
pools. No adults are admitted to the pool areas during this free
period. After 1 P.M. on weekdays and all day on Saturdays, Sundays and
holidays there is a 10˘ charge for children under 14 years of age and a
20˘ charge for children over 14 years and adults at the swimming pools.

                  Two others of the nine bath buildings transferred from the
Borough President of Manhattan will also reopen on the same day, 232 W. 60
Street and 35 West 134 Street.

                  At 60th Street, the building has been renovated to add a
gymnasium to the top floor and also to connect it to the present recreational
building at 59 Street which also has been renovated so that the locker and
shower facilities for the users of both the pool and gymnasium can be
accommodated.  In addition, there is an outdoor swimming pool now under
construction.

                  The 134th Street building, built in 1922, has been
completely modernized to increase the bathing facilities.

                  These bath buildings, originally designed for the use of
people living in cold water flats whose bathing facilities were non-existent,
will continue to function as public baths with increased recreational
facilities in a more sanitary, efficient and useful manner.

                  The work in connection with these improvements was planned
by the Department of Parks and performed by the Works Progress
Administration.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               June 9, 1939


            The Department of Parks announces that approximately 450 girls
of Park Department playgrounds, ranging from 8 to 16 years of age, will
participate in the Fifth Annual Dance Festival scheduled to take place
on the Sheep Meadow, Central Park, 66th Street and West Drive, Saturday,
June 10th, at 2:30 p.m.

            This Dance Festival is one of the outstanding features of the
recreational program prepared for the children of Park Department
playgrounds, housands of spectators attend the dance exhibition annually and
such a high standard of terpsichorean ability has been established that the
girls are eager to perpetuate the enviable reputation attained in past
performances.

            For the past five weeks, the children have attended regularly the
various instruction classes conducted in designated playgrounds of the five
boroughs, where they have been taught intricate dance steps, which require
poise, grace and rhythmic coordination to bring about that precision in
execution so necessary in group dancing.

            In addition, each member of the dancing class is given
instructions in the art of making costumes which will be worn by the
performers.  These costumes play an important in the estimate of the judges
since the appearance of the costume will add to or detract from the dancing
performance.

            On the Sheep Meadow next Saturday, there will be 15 groups in all
composed of three from each of the five boroughs which were selocted as the
result of elimination contests. Ten of the units, two from each borough, will
demonstrate Folk Dancing, characteristic of various nations, and the remaining
five, one from each borough, will perform classical numbers.

           Due to the fact that the steps in different folk dances vary in
difficulty it was decided to classify the folk dances into "Junior" and
"Intermediate".   Therefore, out of the total ten folk dance numbers, each
borough will enter a group in each of the two classifications.

            Plaques will be awarded to the best dancing group in the classical
division and in the "Junior" and "Intermediate" divisions of the folk dances.

            The dances which will be given and playgrounds represented by the
dancers are as follows:

                            JUNIOR FOLK DANCES

"Ace of Diamonds"                 - Model Playground, Richmond

"Krakowyak-Ulana" - Polish Dance  - 23rd Street, Sunset, Leif Eiriksson,
                                    New Utrecht & Owls Head Playgrounds, Bklyn

"Swedish Schottische"             - 0'Connell and Laurelton Playgrounds,
                                    Queens

Scotch Folk Dance                 - Jay Hood Wright Playground, Manhattan

"Wooden shoes" - Dutch Dance      - St. James, Fort #4, 166th and Morris
                                    Avenue and Mullaly Playgrounds

                               CLASSICAL GROUP

"Valse Bleue"                     - St. James and Mullaly Playgrounds, Bronx

"The Dance of the Flowers"        - Roosevelt Playground, Manhattan

"The Garland Dance"               - Jackson Heights and Newtown Playgrounds,
                                    Queens

"Spring Blossoms"                 - New Lots, Riverdale and Snediker Avenues
                                    Playgrounds, Brooklyn

                              INTERMEDIATE FOLK

"JoEstel Kivanok"-Hungarian Dance - Thompson Hill and Windmuller Playgrounds,
                                    Queens

Finnish Folk Dance                - Payson Avenue Playground, Manhattan

Irish Folk Dance                  - De Matti Playground, Richmond

"Kamarinskaya" - Russian Dance    - Lindsay and Williamsburg Housing 
                                    Playgrounds, Brooklyn

Gypsy Mazurka                     - Zimmerman, Williamsbridge, Crotona Park
                                    Playgrounds, Bronx

           The following persons have consented to act as Judges:
Miss G. Sorensen, Savage School for Physical Education; Miss Agness M. Roy,
Albertina Rasch Studios; Mrs. Louise Fokine of the Fokine Ballet School;
and a representative from the Folk Festival Council.

           The Park Department Band will render a few selections prior to the
opening dance and at various intervals during the course of the performance.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               June 9, 1939


                  Bids wero opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for the construction of grade separation structures at Braddock
Avenue and at Jamaica Avenue on the Cross Island Parkway section of the Belt
Parkway system.

                  The grade separation structures for Braddock Avenue will be
a double span concrete bridge with stone facing and will carry Braddock
Avenue traffic over Cross Island Parkway.

                  At Jamaica Avenue traffic will be carried over the Parkway
on a similar structure.

                   Included in this contract i s also the necessary grading
and paving to complete the parkway access roads, and service roads in the
vicinity of these
bridges.

                   With the letting of this contract the construction of 40
of the 63 bridges required for the construction of the Belt Parkway will be
under contract.

                   The three low bidders wero:

National Excavation Corp.
10 East 40 Street, N.Y.C.               $404,768.00

William P. McDonald Construction Co.
Flushing, L.I.                           445,247.00

Garafano Construction Co.
420 Lexington Ave., N. Y. C.             458,641.50

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               June 7, 1939


                       Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks for
the conconstruction of a section of the Belt Parkway between Owl's Eead Park
and Fort Hamilton.

                       The work includes the paving of this section of the
Parkway, together with the construction of a promenade which will skirt the
water front and join the existing promenade at Fort Hamilton to form a
continuous waterfront walk from Owl's Head to Dyker Beach Park.

                       This area has been greatly enlarged by the realignment
of the old winding bulkhead wall at the shorefront and the filling in of the
reclaimed area under a previous contract.

                       Two pedestrian bridges will provide access to the
promenade over the Parkway and the reclaimed areas not needed for the roadway
proper will be developed for playground, recreational and park purposes under
future work.

                       Today's letting is the thirty-third contract to be let
for the construction of the Belt Parkway since this project was approved on
October 13, 1938.  These contracts already let provide for construction along
26 miles of the thirty-mile Belt Parkway.

                 The three low bidders were:

1.   B. Tusecamo Contracting Co.
     Foot of 24th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.              $297,150.84

2.   Highway Improvement and Repair Co.
     125 Barclay Street, N. Y. C.                       309,751.60

3.   Ross Galvanizing Works
     395 Kent Ave., Brooklyn                            316,998.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               June 6, 1939


                      Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at
the Arsenal for two more Belt Parkway contracts.

                      One contract on Shore Parkway provides for the paving
of the parkway from its connection with Bunions Avenue through Marine Park to
Flatbush Avenue and includes the erection of the superstructure of the Plumb
Beach Channel Bridge.  The grading of this area together with the work of the
construction of the foundations of this bridge was performed under a previous
contract.  The bridge over Plumb Beach Channel is a three-span plate girder
bridge and provides a channel clearance of thirty-five feet above mean high
water.

                      The second contract provides for a grade separation
structure on the Cross Island Parkway which will carry parkway traffic under
the relocated Winchester Boulevard and also provides for the paving of the
latter artery.

                      To date thirty-two contracts for 65% of the work have
been let for the construction of the Belt Parkway for a total of
$16,627,820. since this project was approved on October 13, 1938.

                      The three low bidders were:

For Paving Shore Parkway from Emmons Avenue to Flatbush Avenue:

1.     Mill Basin Asphalt Co.
       5410 Avenue U, Brooklyn, N. Y.   $ 437,833.50

2.     Johnson Drake & Piper
       Freeport, L. I.                    441,332.80

3.      Arthur Gallow, Inc.
        260 S. 167 Street, N. Y. C.       469,602.50

For Grade Separation at Cross Island Parkway at Winchester Blvd.

1.      Andrew Weston Co., Inc.
        Woodmere, L. I.                   222,580.00

2.      The Immick Company, Inc.
        50 Church Street, N. Y. C.        222,840.00

3.      Arthur Gallow, Inc.
        260 E. 161 Street, N. Y. C.       228,218.40

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                    Letters and statements have appeared in the Press since
Memorial Day as to the removal of tree guards with memorial tablets from the
trees along Eastern Parkway and Prospect Park Plaza.

                    Directly following the Armistice, there was a pronounced
wave of tree dedications in memory of those who had lost their lives in the
World War and several thousand of such trees were dedicated in New York
City. Bronze plaques on iron guards were the means of marking the veterans'
trees. As the trees grew, root action, wind-swaying and other causes forced
the guards out of position and, in many cases, either broke them or bent them
so that repairs were necessary.

                   Aside from the high maintenance cost of this type of
equipment, the trees, by their natural growth, have now reached the stage
where they are distinctly hampered by the limiting size of the guards. It is
obvious that when a tree passes 12" in diameter it cannot be enclosed in a
12" square cage. As to affixing plaques to the tree trunks, this is entirely
impractical as this would work swift and irreparable injury to the tree as it
would form a local spot where infectious diseases would develop. Then too,
the increase in the girth of the tree would naturally tear out the supports
of the plate.

                   We have taken up with the veterans' organizations the
question of providing a more suitable and more permanent type of memorial for
the soldier dead.  Granite stones set at the trees' bases with bronze name
plates embedded in their tops are the best way that we know of to designate
the trees as memorials.  One should not lose sight of the fact, however, that
a city tree is an impermanent fixture at best as can readily be seen from the
tremendous loss of street trees in last September's hurricane.  We are now
advocating the combining of all the names of a particular group on one bronze
tablet to be erected at some suitable central location which can be
protected, and I trust that we will be successful with our efforts to have
this more permanent form of memorial furnished by the interested veterans'
organizations. This type of memorial Would be really permanent.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               June 3, 1939


         Ceremonies marking the ccanpletion of what amounts to a major "face
lifting" operation in the Rockaways will be held on Saturday, June 3rd when
the reconstructed Cross Bay Parkway approach and Rockaway's new Shorefront
Parkway and park are officially opened.

         Besides Commissioner Robert Moses who will preside as chairman, the
Honorable John J. Halleran, Commissioner of Borough Works, Queens; Honorable
Andrew J. Kenny, President of the Chamber of Commerce of the Rockaways; Colonel
Charles L. Hall, United States District Engineer, New York; Mr. M. J. Madigan,
President, Madigan-Hyland, Consulting Engineers and Governor Alfred E. Smith
will speak at exercises to be held at noon at the intersection of the new
Shorefront Parkway and the Cross Bay Parkway Plaza approach between Beach
94th and Beach 95th Streets.

         The Rockaway Improvement project gives the Rockaways a splendid new
parkway approach, widened thoroughfares, a traffic separator ending the
present bottle-neck congestion at the Rockaway end of the Cross Bay Route, a
two mile shorefront parkway and park and play areas paralleling the parkway
along the beach front.

         The extensive improvements, undertaken by the New York City Parkway
Authority, of which Mr. Moses is the the sole member, have transformed the
old time beach resort of blighted shacks, cheap amusements and limited play
space into a modern shorefront playground of the type and character of
Jones Beach.

         Gone are the catch-penny enterprises that flourished along the
boardwalk.  In transforming this area in the heart of the Rockaways from a
seaside midway into an inviting beach and shorefront park, the many shacks
and lean-to structures along the boardwalk and other dilapidated buildings
have disappeared. More than 700 buildings were removed to clear the way for
the improvements.

         The project begins on the southerly edge of Broad Channel where
Cross Bay Boulevard meets the now Jamaica Bay viaduct, the new Cross Bay
Parkway bridge.

         The new span, a reconstruction of the old viaduct with the addition
of a new bridge and roadway on the westerly side provides double the roadway
capacity of the old bridge.  A new twin lift span with wider roadways
replaces the old draw bridge at the Rockaway end of the viaduct, and the
traffic separator at Beach Channel Drive on the Rockaway bay shore
distributes traffic in all directions over six ample lanes by a system of
overpasses and depressed roadways.

            At the Rockaway end of the Cross Bay route a landscaped parkway
approach plaza has been constructed between Beach 94th and Beach 95th Streets,
leading to the new Shorefront Parkway, the park area, boardwalk and beach.

            The Shorefront Parkway, a major and striking improvement in
itself extends for nearly two miles between Beach 73rd and Beach 109th
Streets end provides two 30-foot roadways for traffic in either direction,
separated by landscaped malls twenty feet wide. The twenty foot sidewalk area
adjacent to the private property is also planted with shrubs and trees.

            The parkway is separated from the boardwalk by park and
playground space along its entire length. This play area, 100 feet in width,
has promenades along which will be found an adequate number of bonches and
drinking fountains.

            Rockaway visitors who have found the crowded beach unsafe and
even impossible for active play will be afforded an opportunity for such play
in the play areas in the park and bathers and others who prefer to loll on
the beach and sun themselves will not bo inconvenionced.

             Courts for handball, paddle tennis, shuffleboard and other games
will be available in the park area. There will he an asphalt roller-skating
rink centrally located in the park and playgrounds for small children, fully
equipped with play apparatus such as see-saws, swings, slides, sand boxes,
exercise units and play houses.

            Attractive park buildings at convenient locations will replace the
ill-kept and inadequate comfort stations found hitherto under the boardwalk.
Those buildings will be accessible from the park, boardwalk or beach and will
contain also first aid stations, food bars, supervised as to the cleanliness
and quality of the fare served; and beach and umbrella concessions.

            At either ond of the parkway, Beach 73rd and Beach 109th Streets
have each been widened to provide two 40-foot roadways separated by malls.

            The Rockaway Improvement, like other recent bridge and parkway
projects, has been planned as a self-liquidating venture.  It will bo paid
for in 10 cent tolls by the motorists who use the now and vastly improved
causeway.

            Moreover, so successful has been the operation of the Marine
Parkway Bridge by the New York City Parkway Authority that the toll on this
span is to be reduced to $.10 with the opening on Saturday of the Cross Bay
project. Thus, the Rockaway visitors will be able to enter or leave this new
shorefront play area by either route.

             Soon a new approach parkway from the north will connect with
Cross Bay Parkway in Broad Channel, improving its present connection with the
Southern Parkway link of the Belt Parkway system.

             In the near future the actual work in the field will start on
the elevation of the Long Island Railroad tracks now running at grade through
the Rockaways, and choking up traffic at every street crossing.  In place of
the tracks at street lovol, we shell have an additional roadway restricted
against parking and private access on the old railroad right-of-way. the new
elevatod structure will eliminate the danger to people and interference with
automobile traffic formerly experienced in the Rockaways.  Toll collections
on the new Cross Bay Parkway Bridge will begin at 2 P.M. on Saturday.

                                    *****

June 1, 1939

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[DUPLICATE COPY ROCKAWAYS IMPROVMENT ANNOUNCEMENT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 31, 1939

The Department of Parks announces that free public dances will
be conducted weekly commencing June 1st at various parks and playgrounds
according to the following schedule:

Mondays         Prospect Park, Picnic House Parking Area, 5th Street and
                Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N.Y.

                Jackson Heights Playground, 25th to 30th Avenues at 84th
                Street, Jackson Heights, Queens

Tuesdays        Mall, Central Park, Manhattan
                Colonial Park, Bradhurst Avenue & West 147th St., N.Y.C.

Wednesdays      La Guardia Playground, South 4th & Havemeyer Streets, Brooklyn
                Poe Park, Grand Concourse & East 192nd Street, Bronx

                McDonald Playground, Forest & Myrtle Avenues, Staten Island

Thursdays       Mall, Central Park, Manhattan

                Victory Field, Woodhaven Boulevard & Myrtle Avenue, Queens

Fridays         Roosevelt Playground, Chrystie and Forsythe Streets, Manhattan

                Astoria Pool, 19th Street opposite 23rd Drive, Astoria, L.I.
                (Dancing on alternate Fridays beginning June 2nd)

                A special program has been arranged for the opening dance on
the Mall on Thursday, June 1st. Mark Warnow and Sammy Kaye will be guest
conductors.

                Music for the dances will be provided by the WPA Federal
Music Project.  All dances will begin at 8:00 P.M. and end at 10:30 P.M.

                Some of the rules governing the conduct of the dances are:
gentlemen are requested to wear jackets and remove hats while on the
dance floor; two ladies are not permitted to dance together and 'cutting
in/ is not allowed; no smoking is permitted on the dance area.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 29, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that well rounded programs have
been prepared for the boys and girls of Park Department Playgrounds in
commemoration of Memorial Day, Tuesday, May 30th at 2:00 P.M.

               Patriotism will be stressed in the form of flag raising
ceremonies, singing of national anthem, and discourses by leading local
citizens on the significance of this day in the calendar of American
Holidays.

               Many of the programs will feature athletic meets which will
include dashes, high jumping, broad jumping and novelty events such as egg
and spoon race, potato race, three legged raceand wheelbarrow race; also
recitations and dance festivals comprising popular children's dances viz.,
Virginia Reel, Carousel, Hansel and Gretal and children's polka.

               Where the facilities permit, softball games and roller skating
races will be included in the playground schedule of Decoration Day
activities.

               Some of the recreational areas at which the celebrations
will take place are as follows:

Manhattan         Heckscher Playground, Central Park, St. Catherine's
                  Playground, Seward Park, Tompkins Square Park, Kelly
                  Playground, and Columbus Playground.

Brooklyn          Stillwell and Avenue U Playground, Seaside Park Playground,
                  Neptune Ave, and West 25th Street Playground,
                  Ave. L and East 17th Street Playground and La Guardia Plgd.

Queens            Jackson Heights Playground, Von Dohlsn Playground, Highland
                  Upper Playground, Liberty Park Playground and
                  Corona 111th Stret Playground.

Richmond          Crescent Ave. Playground, Schmul Park Playground, and
                  Lincoln Ave. Playground.

Bronx             Williamsbridge, Mullaly, and Crotona East Playrounds.

May 27, 1939

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 28, 1939


               The Department of Parks announces that the first Naumerg
Concert in a series of four for the 1939 season will be given on Decoration
Day, Tuesday, May 30th, a t 8:15 P, M, on the Mall, Central Park.

               The music will be rendered by the Naumberg Orchestra with
Jaffrey Harris conducting and Germaine Bruyere as soprano soloist.

               Included in the program will be well known selections by
Liszt, Verdi, Beethoven, Tschaikowsky and Wagner.

               The other Naumberg concerts will take place on the Mall,
Central Park, at 8:15 P.M. on July 4th, July 31st and September 4th.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 26, 1939


               On Saturday, May 27, the Department of Parks will conduct
exercises officially opening the 23 Street and Avenue A outdoor swimming pool
in Manhattan; and in Brooklyn, Mount Prospect Park on the site of the old
Mount Prospect Reservoir adjacent to the Brooklyn Botanical Garden; and the
Marine Park recreation area north of Avenue U. At this latter location, a
plaque will be unveiled in honor of Frederick B. Pratt and Alfred T. White
who assembled and donated land for the development of Marine Park.

               At 23 Street and Avenue A, Mrs. Grace Tenny of the Goddard
House, Father Joseph Larsen of the Carmelite Church and Honorable Fiorello
H. LaGuardia, Mayor of the City of New York, will participate in the
ceremonies with Robert Moses, Commissioner of the Department of Parks,
presiding. Aquatic sports will follow the speakers. The ceremonies start at
10:30 A.M.  Here the old bath building inherited from the Borough President
of Manhattan as a result of the new City Charter has been completely
renovated. To augment the inadequate indoor facilities, outdoor swimming and
diving pools have been added. Immediately adjacent to the north, a new
playground for children is being built.

               At Mount Prospect Park, the exercises will start at 12:00 Noon
and besides Commissioner Moses and the Mayor, Honorable Joseph Goodman,
Commissioner of the Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, and
Honorable Raymond V.  Ingersoll, President of the Borough of Brooklyn will
speak. This area, formerly the site of the old Mount Prospect Reservoir and
bordered by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and
Science and the new Brooklyn Central Library, has been completely developed
as a park including a small children's playground.  These exercises will also
mark the completion of the new laboratory building for the Department of
Water Supply, Gas and Electricity and the adjacent playground for the Park
Department.

          At Marine Park, north of Avenue U, the exercises will start at 2:30
P.M., and the speakers will be Joseph B. Milgram, Chairman of the Pratt-White
Memorial Committee, Senatory William M. Calder, Honorable Raymond V,
Ingersoll and Mayor La Guardia.  Commissioner Moses will preside. After the
speeches, Mr.  Charles Pratt, a son of Frederick B. Pratt, will unveil the
memorial plaque.  Here the exercises mark the completion of a large modern
recreation area in a rapidly growing community. The improvement includes
playgrounds for children of all ages, and tennis, handball, croquet,
horseshoe, basketball courts and bicycle track, as well as baseball and
football fields for adults.

          During the various ceremonies, Commissioner Moses will announce the
completion of work on several other projects in Brooklyn and Manhattan, all
of which wero planned by the Park Department and constructed by the Works
Progress Administration.

May 26, 1939

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                                   PROGRAM
                        OPENING OF MT. PROSPECT PARK
                                May 27, 1939
                                   12 Noon

Band Selections

Honorable Robert Moses, Commissioner, Department of Parks
        - Chairman

Honorable Joseph Goodman, Commissioner, Department of
          Water Supply, Gas and Electricity

Honorable Raymond V. Ingorsoll, President, Borough of Brooklyn
                                                     
Honorable Fiorello E. La Guardia
          Mayor of the City of New York

National Anthem

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                                   PROGRAM
                      OPENING OF MARINE PARK PLAYGROUND
                                     AND
                      UNVEILING OF PRATT-WHITE MEMORIAL
                                   PLAQUE
                                May 27, 1939
                                  2:30 P.M.


Band Selections

Honorable Robert Moses, Commissioner, Department of Parks
        - Chairman

Joseph B. Milgram, Chairman, Pratt White Memorial Committee

Senator William M. Calder

Honorable Raymond V. Ingersoll, President, Borough of Brooklyn

Honorable Fiorello E. La Guardia
          Mayor of the City of New York

Unveiling of Plaque by Mr. Charles Pratt

Call to Colors and Raising of Flag

National Anthem

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 26, 1939


                Two contracts were added to the construction schedule of the
Belt Parkway today when bids were opened by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for the construction of a viaduct from Stillwell Avenue to Shell
Road, and for the grading and paving of Shore and Southern Parkways from
Pennsylvania Avenue to Baisley Boulevard.

                The viaduct which crosses over the right of way and tracks of
the Sea Beach Line and the West End Line, and under the B. M. T.  elevated
structure at Shell Road, is approximately 2740 feet long.  The roadway slabs
will be carried on a steel superstructure supported by steel columns, which
in turn will be supported on steel pipe piles.

                The paving contract will add another 5˝ miles of completed
paving on the Belt Parkway.

                To date, thirty contracts have been let for the con struction
of the Bait Parkway, since this project was approved on October 13,
1938. TLeso contracts provide for the grading of 28 miles of the 32-mile
parkway, for the completed paving along 23 miles of its length, and for the
construction of 37 of the 63 bridges required.

                The three low bidders were:

Viaduct - Stillwell Avenue to Shell Road

           1. P. T. Cox Construction Co., Inc.            $1,051,224.00
              154 Nassau Street, New York City

           2. Frederick Snare Corporation                  1,054,792.00
              114 Liberty Street, New York City

           3. Garafano Construction Co.,Inc.               1,060,660.00
              420 Lexington Avenue, New York City

Paving Pennsylvania Avenue to Baisley Boulevard

           1. Garafano Construction Co., Inc.             $  847,015.00
              420 Lexington Avenue, New York City

           2. Petracca & Banko                               849,735.00
              6919 Queens Boulevard
              Winfield, Long Island

           3. Andrew Weston Co.                              871,250.00
              Woodmere, Long Island


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 26, 1939

               The Department of Parks announces that the annual athletic
meet for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds in the Borough of
Manhattan will take place at 74th Street and Riverside Drive, New York
City, Saturday, May 27th, at 2:00 P.M.

               For the past three weeks, each playground held preliminary
contests and practice sessions in preparation for this borough-wide meet
which will include 18 track and field events.

               Approximately 400 boys and girls of various classifications,
ranging from the 85 lb. class to the unlimited class, have submitted their
entries.

               All competitors have been thoroughly trained by the directors
of their respective playgrounds in the fine points of dashing, baton passing,
broad jumping and high jumping.

               The five who qualify in the finals of each event on Saturday
will represent the Borough of Manhattan in the inter-borough track and field
championships on Saturday, June 17th, at Red Hook Stadium, located at Henry
Street and Gowanus Bay, Brooklyn, at which the winners of the other borough
track meets will compete for city-wide honors.

               Athletic meets are scheduled to take place in the remaining
four boroughs on the foil owing dates:

       Bronx - May 27th - 10:30 A.M.    - Macombs Dam Park, 162nd Street
                                           and River Avenue

       Queens - June 3rd - 1:00 P.M.    - Victory Field, Woodhaven
                                           Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue

       Brooklyn - June 3rd - 1:30 P.M.  - Red Hook Stadium, Henry Street
                                           and Gowanus Bay

       Richmond - June 10th - 1:00 P.M. - Clove Lakes, Clove Road and
                                            Victory Boulevard

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 26, 1939


                   The Department of Parks announces the reopening of twelve
outdoor swimming pools and the Floating Baths on Saturday, May 27th at 10
A.M. They are located as follows:

Manhattan:  Hamilton Fish             E. Houston & Sheriff Streets
            Thomas Jefferson          111th to 114th St. and First Avenue
            Colonial                  Bradhurst Ave. W. 145th to 147th Streets
            Highbridge                Amsterdam Ave. & 173rd Street
            Floating Baths            93rd Street and Hudson River

Brooklyn:   McCarren                  Nassau Ave. & Lorimer Street
            Sunset                    7th Ave. & 43rd Street
            Red Hook                  Clinton, Bay and Henry Streets
            Betsy Head                Hopkinson, Dumont and Livionia Avenues

Bronx:      Crotona                   173rd Street and Fulton Avenue

Queens      Astoria                   Barclay   Street and 24th Avenue

Richmond    Faber                     Faber St. bet. Richmond Terrace &
                                        Kill Van Kull

            Tompkinsville             Arrietta Street at Pier No. 6

                  During the Fall, Winter and Spring these pools have been
operated as free play centers. Various facilities, such as hand ball, volley
ball, paddle tennis and so forth were provided and used by approximately
1,020,000 children and adults. On April 16th they were closed as play centers
and the areas cleaned, painted and put in readiness for the coming season.
From May 27th to June 24th, the pools will open at 10 A.M. and close at 6
P.M.  From June 24th until the termination of the season, they will open at
10 A.M. and close at 10 P.M.  YJhen the heat is oppressive, the pools will
remain open later than 10 P.M., and if the evening hours are cold, or if
there is rain, they will close at an earlier hour depending upon the amount
of patronage.

                   On week days from 10 A.M. to 12:30 Noon, there will be a
free period for children under fourteen years of age, during which hours, no
adults will be admitted to the pool areas. After 1 P.M. on week days and all
day on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, there is a 10˘ charge for children
under fourteen years of age and a 20$ charge for older children and adults.

                Group swimming and diving instructions, intra-pool contests,
water shows, water polo tournaments, life saving and first aid classes will
be part of the aquatic program.

               The new modern bath house at Betsy Head, which was built to
replace the old bath house which was burnt in 1937, will open to the public
with locker accomodations for 5,500 patrons.

                A new outdoor pool, which has been constructed at 23rd Street
and Avenue A will open for the first time on Saturday morning with formal
exercises at 10:30 A.M.  The same aquatic programs will take place at this
new pool as will take place in the other pools.

               Orchard Beach, located in Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx, Jacob
Riis Park and Rockaway Beach in the Rockaway Peninsula, Queens, Coney Island
in Brooklyn and South Beach in Staten Island will also open on Saturday, May
27th.  There are bath house accomodations at Jacob Riis Park, Orchard Beach
and Coney Island.  At Jacob Riis Park there will be accomodations for 14,000
cars and bath house accomodations for 10,000 patrons.  At Orchard Beach there
are accomodations for 6000 cars and the bath house will accomodate 6000
patrons.  The bath house at Coney Island will accomodate 10,000 patrons.  At
Jacob Riis Park and Orchard Beach there will be a 25˘ parking fee for
automobiles.

               The bath house fees at all locations are: 15˘ for child
lockers and 25˘ for adult lockers.  At Jacob Riis Park and Orchard Beach
50˘ per person for a dressing room.

               Recreation areas will be available to the public at Jacob Riis
Park, Orchard Beach and Coney Island which will provide shuffle Board, paddle
tennis and hand ball.  The charge for the use of those facilities will be
10˘ per person, per half hour.  Besides these games areas, at Jacob Riis
Park there is also an 18-hole pitch and putt golf course.  A charge of 50˘
is made for each round of golf played, which includes golf clubs and balls.
Beach chairs and umbrellas may be rented at Orchard Beach and Jacob Riis Park
at a nominal charge.  Beach shops are provided where bathing accessories may
be purchased.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 24, 1939

Hon. Fiorello H. La Guardia
Mayor of The City of New York
Summer City Hall
World's Fair, N. Y.
Dear Sir:

         We have made a careful study of the Council's action last Saturday
by which the Park Department's budget for 1939-1940 was reduced
$285,561. Before taking action on the Council's resolution you should be
apprized of the disastrous effect this reduction in funds will have on the
City's expanded park system.  You will have in mind that the park facilities
were increased 35 percent in the last year, and that an increase of only 6
percent was allowed in the budget as submitted to the Council.

          The report of the Council's Committee on Finance, headed by
Councilman Kinsley, was arbitrary and represented ignorance of the
requirements of the public and the department.  In some details it was
grossly inaccurate.  If the budget, as adopted by the Council should stand,
the expanded park system of the City will deteriorate rapidly.  Even without
the reduction made by the Council we will have difficulty in maintaining
reasonable standards of maintenance, service and protection to the public.
With this further reduction there is not the slightest question that new and
old facilities not only cannot be operated creditably, but that the parks
will not be safe for women and children seeking recreation.

         Dealing with individual items more specifically, the Council cut out
20 additional Climbers and Pruners allowed in the Board of Estimate budget.
This means that we will lose at least 54000 street trees alone during the
coming year.  The loss of trees in parks will be comparable.

         The Council cut the appropriation for Laborers $56,661., which
means a loss of $33.00 per year for each Laborer now working in the
department.  The Park Laborers are now underpaid.  They are the only
uniformed force which does not have annual salaries, sick leave and other
benefits.  Aside from this human factor, the effect of this cut is to reduce
the department's available labor by 10,300 man days.  This means that 30
playgrounds will be unattended for more than half the time during the next
year.

         The Council reduced the item for permanent Assistant Gardeners so
that all Assistant Gardeners now in the department will suffer a pay cut of
$110.00 per year.  The actual loss in labor to the department will be about
8,000 man days. This is equivalent to the work required to keep 80 baseball
diamonds in first class condition for a season.

         In the appropriation for temporary Assistant Gardeners the Council
cut out half of the 200 new positions provided for the care of 50 new
playgrounds, 3,702 acres of park development, and 15 miles of parkways, all
made available to the public since the adoption of the last budget.  This cut
means that we will be unable to take care of landscaping on the Hutchinson
River, Honry Hudson, Whitesone, and Shore Parkways, and the shore front
parkway in Rockaway.  This landscaping cost $150,000 and will bo largely lost
inside of a year unless it is properly taken care of.

         The allowance of additional Carpenters, Housesmiths, and
Plumbers, was slashed by over 50 percent, without considering the fact that
the department's mechanical repairs are far behind schedule already.  Without
these additional mechanics we will be forced to close recreation buildings and
comfort stations for lack of repairs of all kinds.

         The Council's reduction of $5,000. for Assistant Gardeners for golf
courses moans that two courses will not have the additional two Assistant
Gardeners each allowed in the Board of Estimate budget.  This moans that
these two courses cannot be kept up to a reasonable standard, and it may even
mean the loss of portions of the playing areas, just as we lost all the
greens on the Clearviow Course last year for lack of adequate care.  The
Council did not take into consideration the fact that the golf fees have been
revised to provide additional revenue to cover the cost of these additional
men.

           The Council's cut of $5,000, in the code for Contingencies means
that we will be able to uniform only half of the personnel on the Rockaway,
Coney Island and South Beaches. We modified the budget this year so as to
employ the lowest paid available labor on the beaches with the understanding
that we would furnish uniforms for this personnel.

          The Council's reduction of $12,000. for supplies and equipment for
revenue producing facilities means that we will be unable to provide
equipment for the new games areas at Coney Island and Rockaway Beaches; for
the new outdoor swimming pools at East 23rd, Carmine, and West 60th Streets
in Manhattan; and for the new bathhouse in Betsy Head Park.  The games areas
cannot be operated without equipment.  The swimming pools and the bathhouse
can be opened to operation, but they cannot be operated with reasonable
safety; and if we proceed without this equipment, you can expoct that the
City will be the defendant in an increased number of damage suits.  This
money was also intended to provide umbrellas and chairs for rental in the new
Rockaway Beach development. This is a facility which always returns a profit
to the City treasury.

          Such arbitrary action obviously springs from the cheapest political
motives, and has no place in an honest City administration.  Unless you veto
the Council's action on the Park budget, you must expect a deteriorated park
system, a dissatisfied public, and a collapse of the morale of the employees
of one of the major City departments. I assume, of course, that you will veto
those cuts and that they will not be passed over your veto.


                               Very truly yours,

                                     (Robert Moses signature)
                                     Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 25, 1939

                          "LEARN TO SWIM" CAMPAIGN

             The Department of Parks announces that the second annual "Learn
to Swim* Campaign will commence in all Park Department swimming pools on
Monday, June 5th, and continue through Saturday, June 24th,

             Various civic, health and recreational agencies including the
Board of Education have been requested to cooperate in this intensive drive
to teach as many as possible how to swim by conducting similar campaigns in
their own pools during the period June 5th - June 24th.

             According to available statistics, about 6000 persons are
drowned each year in the United States and approximately 339 in New York
City.  Drownings occupy the very prominent position of third place in the
accidental death toll of the nation.

             During July and August when the peak of the swimming season is
reached, drownings and deaths resulting from automobile accidents are about
on a par in the number of fatalities due to accidental means. It has been
estimated that 50% of the drownings occur in rivers and an equal percentage
of all drowning victims were unable to swim.

             Furthermore, a survey by the United States Department of
Commerce of the accidental deaths in the United States by age groups reveals
that drowning victims are found most frequently among boys and girls of the
secondary school age, i.e., between 12 and 19 years old.

             In view of the widespread anxiety on the part of all age groups
to learn how to swim as evidenced by last year's response to the "Learn to
Swim" Campaign and the consistently high correlation between drowning and
inability to swim, the Park Department decided that free swimming
instructions would be given at the various outdoor pools under its
jurisdiction during the period of the "Learn to Swim" Campaign.

             With the launching of this "Learn to Swim" crusade, it is
anticipated that a marked decrease in drownings will be realized as well as
an improvement in City Health, Happiness and General Welfare.

             The list of Park Department outdoor swimming pools which will be
available for the people of New York City during the "Learn to Swim" Campaign
is as follows;

Manhattan  Hamilton Fish Pool          East Houston & Sheriff Streets
           Colonial Pool               Bradhurst Ave., W. 145-147 Streets
           Highbridge Pool             Amsterdam Ave. & W. 173 Street
           Thomas Jefferson Pool       111-114 Streets and 1st Avenue
           23rd Street Pool            23rd Street and Avenue A
           Floating Pool               93rd Street and Riverside Drive

Brooklyn   Sunset Pool                 7th. Avenue & 43rd Street
           McCarren Pool               Nassau Ave. & Lorimer Street
           Red Hook Pool               Clinton, Bay and Henry Streets
           Betsy Head Pool             Hopkinson, Dumont & Livonia Avenues

Bronx      Crotona Pool                173 Street & Fulton Avenue

Queens     Astoria Pool                Barclay Street and 24th Drive

Richmond   Faber Pool                  Faber Street, between Richmond Terrace &
                                                    Kill Tan Kull
           Tompkinsville Pool          Arrietta Street at Pier #6

                                HOURS OF INSTRUCTION

                      Children        10:30 - 11:30 A. M. Daily

                      Children         2:00 -   3:00 P. M. Daily

                      Adults           5:00 -   6:00 P. M. Daily

            It is expected that reconstruction at the following Park
Department indoor pools in Manhattan will be sufficiently completed to have
them open during the "Learn to Swim" period:

Manhattan         409 West 28th Street
                  35 West 134th Street
                  23rd Street and Avenue A
                  232 West 60th Street

                            HOURS OF INSTRUCTION

                      Children        2:00 - 4:00 P. M. Daily

                      Adults          7:30 - 8:30 P. M. Daily

            Admission to the indoor pools is free at all times. Admission to
the outdoor pools is free for children 14 years of age and under every week
day, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays excluded, between the hours of 10
A. M. and 12:30 P. M.  Adults are not permitted in the pools during the
children's free morning period. An admission fee of 20˘ is charged for
adults in the outdoor pools. There is no extra charge for instruction.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 23, 1939


      The Department of Parks announces that the city-wide finals of the
marble contest for boys and girls up to twelve years of age will be held at
Heckscher Playground on Thursday, May 25 at 4:00 P.M.

      Playground and district finals were held prior to the borough
eliminations at which the five best players were selected to represent the
borough at the city-wide finals on Thursday.

      Medals will be awarded to the winners of the finals.

      In case of rain the contest will be held at the same time on Friday,
May 26.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 19, 1939


              On Saturday, May 20, 1939, at 1:30 P.M., the Department of Parks
will conduct Model Sail and Motor Boat Races at Conservatory Lake, 72nd
Street and 5th Avenue, Central Park, Manhattan.

             Any boy or girl eighteen years of age or younger may enter a
sail or motor boat in any of the following classes, provided he owns the
boat and sails it himself.

       SAIL BOATS                                      MOTOR BOATS 

Class (a) from 12" - 18"                        Class (g) Electric and spring
      (b)    " 18" - 25"                                   powered
      (c)    " 25" - 32"                              (h) Steam and gasoline
      (d)    " 32" - 40"                                   driven
      (e)    " 40" - 50"
      (f) Constructed models to 30"

Note: All boats to be measured for overall length from stern to bow, but
      not including bowsprit.

             A contestant may enter Class (f) in addition to the other classes
if his boat is a home built model.

              Boats are to sail along a pre-determined course and
instructions will be given to contestants on the day of the races.
Contestants must apply at the judges' booth not later than 12 noon on
Saturday for measuring in of boats and assigning of race numbers.

              Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to the winners
of each event.

              Each of the boroughs mentioned below will hold similar model
yacht and motor boat races according to the following schedule:

              May 20 - Bronx: Crotona Park Lake - 2:00 P.M.

              May 20 - Brooklyn: Prospect Park Lake - 2:00 P.M.

              June 3 - Richmond: Martlings Pond - Clove Lakes - 2:00 P.M.

              Entry blanks for the above events may be secured from the
respective Borough Directors whose addresses are as follows:

Manhattan     Mr. Kenneth Franklin - Arsenal Building, Central Park,
                                         64th Street and 5th Avenue, N.Y. C.

Bronx         Mr. George L. Quigley - Administration Building - Bronx Park

                                         East and Birchall Avenue, Bronx

Brooklyn      Mr. Richard C. Jenkins - Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park West

                                         and Fifth Street, Brooklyn

Richmond      Mr. James J. Mallen - Field House, Clove Lakes Park, Victory
                                         Boulevard and Clove Road, West
                                         Brighton, S. I.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 19, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that the second amateur
photographic contest depicting "YOUTH AND AGE IN OUR CITY PARKS AND
PLAYGROUNDS" will begin on May 20th and will end on September 20th, 1939.

             All pictures submitted by the contestants must represent scenes
in parks, parkways, pools, beaches and playgrounds under the jurisdiction
of the Department of Parks during the year 1939.

             The initial amateur photography contest conducted by the Park
Department last year indicated such widespread interest on the part of both
children and adults that it was decided to classify the entrants according to
the following age groups:

             Class A - Children up to 14 years of age

             Class B - Children between 15 and 18 years of age

             Class C - Persons over 18 years of age

             Rules governing the contest are:

             1. All pictures must be 8˝" x 10" prints and mounted on stiff
paper or cardboard.

             2. The name, address and age group of the contestant should be
clearly written on the reverse side of each picture.

             3. The Department of Parks shall have the right to reproduce any
picture submitted for park purposes.

             4. Negatives must be available upon request.

             5. Contestants may submit no more than five pictures.

             6. Pictures may show spring, summer, fall or winter activities.

             7. The decision of the judges shall be final in all cases.

             8. Prizes will be awarded to the three contestants in each age
group who submit the best pictures.  No competitor is eligible to win more
than one prize.

             Grand prizes have been donated by R.H. Macy & Co., Abe
Cohen's Exchange, Inc., Willoughby's and the Park Association of New York
City, Inc.

             Those desirous of entering the contest are requested to submit
photographs between May 20th and September 20th.  The names and addresses of
the various borough directors who will receive photographs are:

Manhattan - Mr. Kenneth S. Franklin - Arsenal Building, Central Park 64 St and
                                      Fifth Avenue, New York City

Brooklyn  - Mr. Richard C. Jenkins - Litchfield Mansion,
                                     5th Street and Prospect Park West,
                                     Brooklyn

Queens    - Mr. Philip J. Cruise  - Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens, Queens

Bronx     - Mr. George Quigley    - Administration Building, Bronx Park 3ast
                                       and Birchall Avenue, Bronx

Richmond     - Mr. James Mallen   - Clove Lakes, New Brighton, Richmond

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                                                         MONDAY, MAY 15, 1939


                       Thoughtful and far-sighted civic planning have ensured
for New York City a rich heritage after the great World's Fair has passed
into history.  Within a very short time after the last Fair rocket has flared
in the sky and the echo of the barker has faded on the wind, a splendid 1200
acre public park, accessible from all parts of the city by unsurpassed transit
facilities and a system of parkways and boulevards, will have emerged.

                       More than that, an extensive area of Queens Borough
surrounding the park will have been saved from haphazard development which in
years past has resulted in the slow creation of blighted areas, and instead
will make a large and desirable section of the borough available for
residential development.  To this purpose, Flushing Meadow Park, is a major
contributing factor.

                       Tne story of the efforts and agencies that have made
this happy heritage possible is told in salient detail by the men who
directed this outstanding example of long-range civic planning in the final
edition of "The Flushing Meadow Improvement," the official publication of the
City and State officials in charge of basic improvements in Flushing Meadow
Park as well as with the preparation of the park site for the World's Fair.

                       This publication, issued periodically during the
progress of the basic improvements which converted a malodorous dump area
into a glorious World's Fair with, ultimately, a completed metamorphosis
in the form of a great park and recreational center, is compiled under the
direction of Park Commissioner Robert Hoses and a coordinating committee.

                    The committee, comprising the men who have worked with
Commissioner Moses in effecting the wholesome transformation of this great
Queens area includes Allyn R. Jennings, General Superintendent of Park
Department, chairman; James A. Dawson, Park Director in Charge of Design;
Major Irving V. A. Huie, Commissioner of Public Works; James F. Evans,
Director of State Parks; Joseph J. Darcy, District Engineer of the State
Department of Public Works; Arthur E. Howland, Chief Engineer of the Long
Island State Park Commission; Charles U. Powell, Chief Engineer of the Queens
Topographical Bureau; George E. Spargo, Executive Officer and Harry Sweeny,
Park Director, of the Park Department.

                    The opening article, signed by Commissioner Moses,
reviews the basic improvement work and contains some of the material used by
Mr. Moses in an article on the subject which appeared some time ago in the
Saturday Evening Post under the title "From Dump to Glory."

                    "Other expositions in this country have left permanent
civic improvements behind them.  It has been the rule to dredge waterways,
fill in swamps and reclaim land for future park use as well as for the Fair
itself," writes Mr. Moses. Municipal parks have usually been the residuary
legatees."

                    "What distinguishes the Flushing Meadow reclamation for
the New York World's Fair of 1939 from its predecessors, Mr. Moses adds, "is
not only the huge scale of operations but the fact that the entire permanent
civic improvement has been planned in advance, written into law and cemented
by a binding contract.

                    "There will be nothing to fight about when the Fair is
over. There will be no squabbles about obligations of the Fair to the City no
questions as to what the city will inherit and no arguments as to what is
temporary and what is permanent.  In this respect we have taken the lessons
of other American fairs to heart."

                    The bill for the permanent City and State improvement
program, serving not alone the Fair, but the future park and including the
closely related improvements affecting the entire area surrounding the Fair,
will come to $59,000,000.

                    The Committee on Basic Improvements estimates that the
cost of converting the Fair grounds into a park will be approximately
$5,500,000 of which $4,000,000 will be required in 1940.

                    Under the law, and the contracts binding the City and the
Fair Corporation, net revenues of the Fair, after payment of bonds and other
liabilities, are to be distributed as follows: the first $2,000,000 is
allotted to the Park Department for the development of Flushing Meadow Park,
after which $1,700,000 is to be used to reimburse the city for the extension
of the city's subway system from Queens boulevard to a Fair terminal in
World's Fair Boulevard.

                    The next $4,000,000 or any part thereof is to be divided
equally between the State and the City, with the city's share to be devoted
to the development of the park.

                    The remainder of the Fair's revenues is destined to go to
charitable institutions.

                    While a conservative estimate based on attendance surveys
indicates that 1939 revenues will in all likelihood be sufficient to carry
out this program including something for charitable purposes, a second
Summer's operation of the Fair in 1940 would almost certainly bring about the
result.

                    There is ample evidence in the rapid rate of growth in
Queens that the great park planned for the Flushing meadows will be required
with all of its facilities to meet the normal recreation needs of the
surrounding Queens communities, as soon aŁter the Fair as it can be
developed.

                    Since the removal of the Corona dump the population in
the Flushing-Corona-Kew Gardens areas bordering on the Fair site has
increased 25 per cent.

                     With the protective zoning features surrounding park and
parkway development the area for a considerable distance round the 1200 acre
park, traversed by landscaped parkways and served by landscaped parkways and
served by excellent rapid transit facilities will be ideal for residential
development.

                     With the rapid and sustained increase in population in
Queens, particularly in the Flushing and Jamaica areas, little or no vacant
land would soon have been available for adequate park purposes.

                     The plan for the park has been prepared with every
effort to locate its recreational facilities at points where they will serve
the the greatest number of people.

                     Aside from its primary purpose in serving a large and
growing section of Queens, this great park, larger than Central Park in
Manhattan, is so well served by transit of all sorts, as well as by parkways
and highways, that it is accessible within thirty minutes ride of any point
within a ten mile radius.

                     Everything that a great city park can and should be has
been the objective of the planners of Flushing Meadow park.  In its broad
acres there will be provision for both active and passive recreation. There
will be pleasant gardens and promenades, formal park development for rest and
peacefullness.  There will be woodland areas of less formal development, and
bird sanctuaries.

                     In addition, there will be tree-bordered open meadows
for pageants and festivals, childrens gardens where children may plant,
cultivate, and harvest flowers and garden produce under the guidance of
competent instructors.

                     There will be playgrounds at points convenient to
residential areas for children of all age groups. There will be ample
facilities for all active sports, tennis, baseball, football, golf, archery,
la crosse, hockey, roller-skating, ice-skating in the Winter, six miles of
bicycle paths, five miles of bridle paths.  Picnic grounds will be provided
bordering Meadow Lake.  Facilities will be provided for model yacht racing.

                    In addition to the wide variety and number of play
facilities, throughout the extensive park area, pageants, water operas such
as have become popular at Jones Beach, musical shows, band concerts and
spectacles can be staged in the 12,000 seat Amphitheatre on Meadow Lake,
erected by the State for the Fair but constructed as a permanent improvement
for the park.

                    The New York City Building which houses the city's own
exhibits at the Fair, will be an outstanding feature of the park. This
handsome, fire-proof, air-conditioned permanent structure covering two and a
half acres will be converted into a great indoor recreation center.  Half of
the main floor space, 180 x 116, has been constructed to provide for
ice-skating or ice-hockey.  Provision is also made for indoor baseball,
gymnastics exhibitions, theatrical presentations, basketball, regulation
tennis, badminton, shuffle-board.  Track events and roller-skating rink
facilities will also be available in the building.

                    This latest and last of The Flushing Meadow Improvement
booklets tells the story of what the city will get after the Fair is over and
just what everything costs.  It is an informative and inspiring story of
progressive planning for the future.

                                 **********

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 13, 1939


                The work on the erection of the famous Vanderbilt Gates at
the entrance to the Conservatory Gardens in Central Park at 105th Street and
Fifth Avenue was completed today.

                The gates, 16 feet high and 15 feet wide, and fence 9 feet
high, were fabricated in Paris of wrought iron with scroll work and
ornamentations of cast bronze.  They were designed by George B. Post in 1894
for the mansion of Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt at 58th Street and Fifth
Avenue.

                The gates and fence, placed in storage when the mansion was
demolished in 1928, will now through the generosity of Mrs.  Gertrude
Vanderbilt Whitney, daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt, make a beautiful
permanent portal to the Gardens, the first of their kind in the City.

                The work was performed by Abraham M. Goldsmith who started
on December 19, 1938 under the supervision of the Department of Parks
and under contract from Mrs. Whitney, at a cost of $15,000.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 12, 1939


               Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks for the
paving of the Shore Parkway section of the Belt Parkway system from Flatbush
Avenue to Pennsylvania Avenue, approximately 3-1/2 miles in length.  The work
also includes the construction of a four-span steel structure supported on
steel pipe piles to carry the Shore Parkway traffic over Rockaway Avenue.

               This contract is the 28th to be let for the construction of
the Belt Parkway since this project was approved on October 13, 1938.
Contracts already let provide for the grading of 26 miles of the 32-mile
parkway, the completed paving of 16 miles of parkway and the construction of
36 of the 63 bridges required.

               This portion of the parkway has been graded under a previous
contract by means of hydraulic fill pumped in from adjacent areas in Jamaica
Bay.

               The three low bidders were:

               Johnson, Drake & Piper
               Freeport, L. I.                            $658,717.

               William P. McDonald Construction Co.
               3315 Lawrence St., Flushing, L. I.          662,786.

               Petracco & Banko
               6919 Winfield Avenue, Winfield, L.I.        683,054.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                                May 2, 1939


           In order that the general public might be able to visit the 38
warships of the U. S. Navy now assembling in the Hudson River, the Park
Department has provided landing floats at 72nd, 77th, 79th, 83rd, 94th, 97th
and 99th Streets.

           From the 72nd, and 93rd Street floats, free passage will be
provided by navy gigs, and from the 77th, 83rd, 97th and 99th Street floats,
boats operated by concessionaires will ply back and forth to the various
ships at a charge of 25˘ each way per person.

           Ships of the fleet will be open to visitors from 1 P.M. to
4:00P.M. daily during the visit of the squadron.

           During hours of 10 A.M. to 10 P.M., concession boats will also
make excursion trips around the fleet at 50˘ per person.

           Aside from the landing stages, the Department of Parks has also
erected in Riverside Park, two nautically designed buildings, one located at
72nd Street and the other at 97th Street. Each building contains comfort
facilities for men and women; a first aid station, an information booth, and
a Navy Shore Patrol office.

           To facilitate the handling of the large crowds of persons usually
attracted to the fleet, two elaborate bulletin boards have been erected, one
at 72nd Street and the other at 96th Street, showing the loction of the
various ships moorings. Directional signs and wire fencing have been placed
where necessary adjacent to paths, the parkway and river front to protect
park shrubbery, lawns and human lives.

           Immediately after the departure of the fleet later in May, the
temporary landing stages, buildings and fencing will be removed and the park
restored to its original design.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                                May 1, 1939


                        Bids were opened today, by the Department of Parks at
the Arsenal in Central Park for another section of Cross Island Parkway, from
Hillside Avenue to Grand Central Parkway.

                        The work under this contract provides for the paving
of the parkway between the limits mentioned above and includes the
construction of a grade separation structure at Union Turnpike.

                        A portion of this work passes through the lands of
the Creedmoor Hospital where it has been necessary to relocate the hospital
road, to provide it with access to Union Turnpike and Commonwealth Boulevard.

                        The bridge over Union Turnpike is a double span stone
faced reinforced concrete structure and will carry both the Union Turnpike
and the Creedmore Hospital traffic over the Parkway.

                        This work is part of the Belt Parkway system Which is
being jointly financed by the City of New York and the Federal Public Works
Administration.

                        To date, the work under contract on this project
calls for the grading of 26 miles and the paving of 14 miles of the 32 mile
Belt Parkway system.

                        The three low bidders were:

                        Tuckahoe Construction Co.              $430,747,50
                        116 Columbus Avenue
                        Tuckahoe, N. Y.

                        Garofano Construction Co.               432,095.80
                        420 Lexington Avenue, N.Y.C.

                        Petracca & Banko                        436,726.70
                        6919 Queens Blvd., Winfield, N.Y.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 28, 1939


       Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks, at the Arsenal in
Central Park, for the paving of a section of Cross Island Parkway from its
intersection with the Bronx-Whitestone Parkway to 39th Avenue in the Borough
of Queens«.

       This contract is the 26th to be let for the construction of the Belt
Parkway, since this project was approved on October 13, 1938, for a total of
$12,979,000. The contracts already let provide for the grading of 26 miles
of the 32 mile project, the paving of 13 miles and the construction of 34 of
the 63 bridges required.

       The work under this contract, in addition to providing for the paving
of the parkway between the above mentioned limits also provides for the
paving of service roads adjacent to the Parkway between Cross Island
Boulevard and fort Totten.

       The work under this contract is to be completed on or before December
15, 1939.

       The three low bidders were:

            J. Leopold & Co.                    $772,415.00
            60 East 42 Street, N.Y.C.

            Wm. P . McDonald                     787,355,00
            Flushing, N.Y.

            Highway Improvement & Repair Co.     822,585.00
            125 Barclay St., N.Y.C.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 27, 1939


                Five more bridges on the Belt Parkway were placed under
construction, when bids were opened on two contracts today by the Department
of Parks, at the Arsenal, in Central Park.

                One contract provides for the construction of the
substructure for the bridge over Mill Basin on Shore Parkway.
The second contract provides for the construction of four bridges
on Southern Parkway - at 150th Street, Van Wyck Boulevard, 130th St.,
and Lefferts Boulevard respectively.

               The bridge at Mill Basin is to be a steel girder type with a
center bascule span, and will be 864 feet 6 inches long between abutments.
The center bascule span will rpovide a clear channel at Mill Basin - 131 feet
wide, and an underclearance of 35 feet with the span down.  The bases of the
piers which support the bascule span will be built in steel sheet-pile
cofferdams, with the sheet piling left in place as a protection against
scour.

               The work under this contract provides for the construction of
all the piers and abutments complete in all respects and ready for the
superstructure.

               The bridges, located respectively at 150th Street, Van Wyck
Boulevard, 130th Street, and Lefferts Boulevard are stone faced, reinforced
concrete bridges and in each case carry the street over the Parkway.

               With the letting of today's contracts, 34 of the 63 bridges
required for the Belt Parkway System, which is being jointly financed by the
City of New York and the Federal Public Works Administration will be under
contract.

               The three low bidders on each contract were as follows:

Substructure Mill Basin Bridge

               P. J. Carlin Construction               $721,557.00
               405 Lexington Avenue, N. Y. C.

               Frederick Snare Corporation              727,335.00
               114 Liberty Street, N. Y. C.

               Charles F. Vachris                       734,794.50
               827 Remsen Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.

Southern Parkway Bridges at 150th Street,, Van Wyck Boulevard,
130th Street, and Lefferts Boulevard

               Mill Basin Asphalt Corp.                $309,381.50
               5410 Avenue "U", Brooklyn, N.Y.

               P. J. Carlin Construction                329,527.65
               405 Lexington Avenue, N. Y. C.

               Cayuga Construction Corp.                350,194.50
               5 Beekman Street, N. Y. C.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 26, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that tfce following areas hare
been designated for Kite Flying:

       Manhattan - Great Lawn, Central Park

       Brooklyn  - Long Meadow, Prospect Park} Marine Park} McCarren Park;
                   Canarsie Park; Columbia and Halleck Park

       Queens    - Alley Pond Park; Cunningham Park; Kiasena Park; Juniper
                   Valley Park

       Richmod   - Willowbrook Park; Clove Lakes Park; Walker Park

       Bronx     - Van Cortlandt Park

            On Saturday, April 29th at 2:00 P.M., the Park Department will
conduct a Kite Flying Contest for boys and girla - 7 to 16 years of age - in
each of the boroughs, at the following locations:

       Manhattan - Great Lawn, Central Park(opposite 82nd Street)
       Brooklyn  - Long Meadow, Prospect Park
       Queens    - Alley Pond Perk
       Richmond  - Willowbrook Park
       Bronx     - Williamsbridga Playground

               The events will include a reeling contest for children 7 to 10
years; an altitude contest and a looping contest for contestants 11 to 16
years; and a special novelty and artistic competition open to all age groups.
In the latter classification, kites will be judged for size, shape, and
construction, mode of flying, etc. Certificates of award will be given to the
winners of each event.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 26, 1939


                  The Department of Parks announces that the Tavern on the
Green in Central Park will reopen on April 28th.

                  The Tavern, formerly the old Central Park Sheepfold,
located on the west side of Central Park opposite 67th Street, remodeled and
opened to the public as a popularly priced restaurant in 1934, has been
entirely redecorated.

                  This year, it will be operated again by the Savarin's
Management, Inc. who also operate restaurants in the Waldorf Astoria, the
Equitable Building, the New York Life Building and Pennsylvania Railroad
stations in New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Pittsburgh.

                  Breakfast will be from 50˘ up; luncheon 85˘ and
up. and dinner $51.e5 and up - or one may eat a la carte.  After 9 P.M.,
there will be a minimum charge of $1.00.

                  Entertainment in the form of music and dancing
will be provided nightly.

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FOR RELEASE TO WESTCHESTER COUNTY NEWSPAPERS, TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1939

          The Triborough Bridge Authority, Westchester County Park Commission
and the Committee of City and State officials in charge of Basic Improvements
at Flushing Meadow Park to provide a site for the World's Fair of 1939 have
indicated, on the accompanying map the best route to the World's Fair for
Westchester County residents.

          In most part, these routes will be marked in both the City and
the County with Trylon-Perisphere direction signs; while in the City, these
signs will be supplemented, on the main highway routes, by the street lights
to the right hand of the Fair-bound motorist being encased in yellow globes.

          It will be noted that a "traffic shed" extends midway through the
Bronx and is carried up into Westchester.  On the west side of the County,
the motorist is urged to avoid congestion by using the Saw Mill River and
Henry Hudson Parkways to Dyckman Street, thence by the Harlem River Drive,
St. Nicholas Avenue, 145th Street, Deegan Boulevard (the new west approach to
the Triborough Bridge) and along the Grand Central Parkway to the Fair.

          In central Westchester the Bronx River Parkway is open throughout
its length and also there is recommended the optional route from the
Hawthorne Circle via the Bronx Parkway Extension to Valhalla by way of
Central Westchester Parkway and Westchester Avenue to the Hutchinson River
Parkway, which connects with Eastern Boulevard and Whitestone Bridge
Approach.

          All traffic to the east of Central Park Avenue (Route 100) is
urged to follow any of the marked routes to the new Bronx-Whitestone Bridge,
which opens on Saturday, April 29th, and whose Queens portal is but a
short distance from the World's Fair.

ATTACH - MAP

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 24, 1939


            The Department of Parks announces that the pitch and putt golf
course at Jacob Riis Park will open for play on Saturday, April 29th.  A
charge of 50˘ a round is made for this course.

            The games areas, including shuffle board, paddle tennis and hand
ball courts will be open for play and a charge of 10˘ per half hour per
person is made.  During the winter these games areas are free to the public.

            There is no charge made for parking at Jacob Riis Park or Orchard
Beach until May 27th.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 24, 1939


                     The Department of Parks announces that because of delay
in delivery of materials, it has been necessary to postpone the opening of
the playground at Atlantic Avenue and 88th Street, Queens.  This work, which
was to be completed by May 6th, will not be ready for the use of the public
until later in the month.  As soon as the work has reached a point where a
definite date can be determined, it will be announced through the press.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 21, 1939


                Bids were opened today, by the Department of Parks, at the
Arsenal in Central Park for the construction of a portion of the Shore
Parkway section of the Belt Parkway from Bay Parkway to Bay 49th Street.

                 The work under this contract provides for grading and paving
the parkway between the limits mentioned above and also provides for the
construction of grade elimination structures at Bay Parkway and 26th Avenue.

                Parkway traffic will be carried over Bay Parkway by means of
a single span steel girder structure with stone-faced wing walls.  A
stone-faced reinforced concrete structure will carry the parkway over 26th
Avenue.

                 This contract is the 23rd to be let for the construction of
the Belt Parkway which is being jointly financed by the City of New York and
the Federal Public Works Administration. Contracts now let on this project
total $11,000,000 or 44% of the total project.

                 The work under this project is to be completed on or
before December 30, 1939.

                 The three low bidders were;

                 B. Turecamo Contracting Co.               $746,062.
                 Foot of 24th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.

                 Johnson Drake & Pipe Co.                  $747,945.
                 Freeport, N. Y.

                 Ross Galvanizing Works                    $771,626.
                 395 Kent Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 20, 1939


            City officials, members of the New York City World's Fair
Commission, were given a preview of the city's own show in the City Building
at the World's Fair yesterday.

            Mayor LaGuardia's reaction was fairly typical.  "I expected to be
disappointed.  Instead, I was agreeably surprised and gratified."  Council
President Newbold Morris expressed his entire satisfaction and delight.

            The City Commission, comprising in general the members of the
Board of Estimate, leaders of the City Council and some of the leading
citizenry indicated the attitude of the average Fair visitor craning their
necks and voicing appropriate exclamations at the wonders of the exposition.

            The dramatization of the controls and services, the manifold
functions that go to make up the government of New York City's 7,000,000
inhabitants presented in a coherent, living pageant in the great main hall of
the City Building drew general praise from the members of the City's
Commission.

            Miss Fannie Hurst, Secretary of the Commission, and novelist of
distinction, who knows something about humanities, herself, expressed her
delight with the manner in which the functions of the city's government were
"humanized and dramatized so that the average Fair visitor would receive a
comprehension which mere recitation of facts and figures might never convey."

            Borough President Stanley M. Isaacs of Manhattan thought the
exhibits highly informative and effective and Borough President Raymond V.
Ingersoll of Brooklyn said that the show was "thrilling."  Borough President
James J. Lyons of the Bronx said it was "a fine show and well done" but
regretted that the great map murals failed to place Marble Hill "properly" in
the Borough of the Bronx.  Staten Island's Borough President, Joseph A.
Palma joined in the general commendation.

             Even the captious Councilman found nothing to criticize and
Councilman James A. Burke of Queens, arch critic of some of the city's
policies anent the Fair, was positively enthusiastic.  "It's a fine job, the
city's exhibit, and it has been accomplished without extravagance," said
Mr. Burke.

             The official party was conducted in the tour of inspection by
Murray W. Stand, Director of the City Commission.

             The extensive city exhibit set up in orderly fashion in the
great hall of the handsome City Building, one of the few permanent structures
at the Fair, was constructed at an expenditure considerably under the square
foot cost of the municipal exhibits at the Chicago and San Francisco fairs.

             In several of the departmental exhibit units, animated
demonstrations of the department's work are presented.  The city firemen are
shown in actual drills at a mock tenement house blaze.  Real firemen scale
ladders of a four story structure, rescue real people, demonstrate the use of
fire nets by actual leaps from the roof or upper story windows of the
"building."

             The Police Department's exhibit features a stage presentation of
a mystery thriller, "Murder at Midnight", and the visitor sees before him the
commission of a crime and its ultimate solution, utilizing all the resources
of the department's detective routine and laboratory procedure in the tracing
of clues, leading ultimately to the arrest of the culprit.

             Cycloramas, dioramas, graphic photomurals are all utilized as
visual aids in presenting the governmental functions; even the Budget
Director's work is dramatized by a sort of "digestive" machine which receives
departmental requests in the form of moving "eggs" of light. After
"treatment" based on current and estimated revenues the "eggs" emerge
appropriately reduced in size to conform to the city's financial abilities.

             The visitor, throughout the city exhibit, is invited to
participate in the show by operating an intriguing array of push buttons and
levers setting the lights, mannikins, cycloramic drums and other equipment in
motion.

             The preview visitors were invited to pick up a phone at the
Police exhibit and call a policeman.  That having been done, they stood by,
watched the alarm flashed on the signal board, watched and heard it relayed
to cruising radio cars, observed it coming over the teletype tickers in the
precinct station houses and were able to visualize the ready response.

             They viewed the intricate but efficient system which relays a
fire alarm.  They sent in an alarm and watched the actual workings of the
Fire Department's alarm telegraph bureau.

             In addition to the departmental exhibits, grouped about the
city's "theme center", the Board of Estimate, the city's show at the Fair
includes motion pictures and illustrated lectures on city government and its
various phases and functions, presented in a small auditorium.

             Adequate space is also provided in the City Building for a
public lounge where the weary visitor may rest in comfortable air conditioned
surroundings and obtain a comprehensive view of the entire exhibit, or listen
to music which will be provided from a balcony vantage by concert bands and
orchestras.

             In the official party that inspected the city's exhibit, besides
those already mentioned, were Councilman Joseph T. Sharkey, Andrew R.
Armstrong, Charles E. Keegan, John P. Nugent, Frederick Schick and
Councilwoman Genevieve B. Earle. Also present were Miss Mary Dillon,
Mrs. Louis A. Dreyfuss, Dr. Harry Woodburn Chase and Mrs. Peter Sammartino.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 19, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that ceremonies in connection
with the opening of Schmul Park, Wild and Melvin Avenues, Travis, Staten
Island, will take place on Thursday, April 20th at 4 P.M.

             Hon. Joseph A. Palraa, Borough President of Richmond, and
Mr. Louis Schmul will participate in the exercises.  Park Commissioner Robert
Moses will preside.

             As part of the exercises, Mr. Schmul will unveil a bronze plaque
reading as follows:

                                "SCHMUL PARK
                          LOUIS AND HERMINE SCHMUL
                           Presented this Property
                                   to the
                              City of New York
                  IF MEMORY OF HAINMAN AND AND ROSA SCHMUL
                                   1938."

             Approximately one-half of this 8˝-acre plot has been
developed by the Works Progress Administration under the supervision of the
Park Department into a recreational area, equipped with playground apparatus,
for the children of the adjacent com- munity.  There is also a one-story
brick comfort station.

             Later, when sufficient fill is available, the remaining portion
of the park will be developed to provide facilities for baseball and other
types of group games demanding more space.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 15, 1939


                The Department of Parks announces that the Winter and Spring
use of the play centers inaugurated September 17 last year, will terminate
Sunday evening, April 16th, so that the areas can be cleaned, painted and
generally prepared for the coming swimming season.  Swimming pools will
reopen to the public at 10 A.M. on Saturday, May 27th.

                During the swimming season, children under fourteen years of
age will be admitted free from 10 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.  every day except
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. After 1 P.M.  on week days and all day on
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, children under fourteen years of age will be
admitted for $.10 and all others for $.20.  1,020,321 children and adults
have made use of the facilities offered since the close of last year's
swimming season.  In the pool areas, handball, shuffle board, paddle tennis,
basket ball, volley ball and various group games were provided for.  During
the winter, when the weather was too cold, the activities were moved into the
buildings where facilities were provided for ping pong, checkers, quoits and
various group games.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 13, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that on Friday afternoon,
April 14th, at 1:30 P.M., the children of the Park Department Gardens will
begin Spring planting in the 2000 individual garden plots located throughout
the five boroughs as follows:

                              Manhattan Gardens

Thomas Jefferson Garden                    114th Street and Pleasant Avenue

St. Gabriel's Garden                       35th Street and First Avenue

Seward Garden                              Jefferson and ffanal Streets

Amsterdam Garden                           189th Street and Amsterdam Avenue

                              Brooklyn Gardens

Betsy Head Garden                           Hopkinson Avenue and Blake Avenue

Fort Greene Garden                          Myrtle Avenue and N» Portland Ave,

                                Queens Garden

Highland Garden                             Jamaica Avenue and Cleveland Street

                               Richmond Garden

De Matti Garden                             Rosebank, Staten Island

                                Bronx Garden

Crotona Garden                              St. Paul's Place and Fulton Avenue

              The first crop will be radishes, lettuce, scallions and
kohl-rabi, which will be ready for harvest before the summer crops are
planted.  The seeds, tools and the instructor are provided by the Park
Department,

              After the Spring harvest, an entirely new group of children, as
well as vegetables will take possession of the garden plots.

              As the season advances, little plots along the border of the
garden are planted by the children, with flowers, and interesting economic
crops like peanuts, broom corn, cotton, wheat, and rye.

              Each boy and girl watch the pages of nature unfold its
interesting leaves, as well as lend a hand to watering, weeding or rolling a
wheelbarrow in these little gardens.

              The following are the largest gardens: Thomas J efferson Park
Garden, Manhattan, Fort Greene Park Garden and Betsy Head Park Garden,
Brooklyn.  Highland Park Garden, Queens, and Crotona parle Garden, Bronx.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 11, 1939


                  Bids were opened yesterday by the Park Department at the
Arsenal Building 64th Street and Fifth Avenue for planting on the north side
of Grand Central Parkway Extension between 85th Street and 94th Street
adjoining the North Beach Airport.  The project will be supervised by the
Park Department with funds provided by the Department of Docks.

                  The work consists of grading, topsoiling, seeding, and
planting of trees and shrubs in an area where the surface had to be lowered
approximately five feet to meet future flying requirements at the new
airport.

                  The following were the three lowest bidders:

                  John Gozo
                  1625 West 6th Street
                  Brooklyn, N. Y.                      $11,413.15

                  Grand View Nurseries
                  6 Grand View Avenue
                  Mt. Vernon, N.Y.                      11,512.25

                  Roman Landscape Contracting Co., Inc.
                  551 Fifth Avenue
                  New York, N. Y.                        11,605.75

          The engineer's estimate was $14,683. and the work will be completed
in forty-five calendar days.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                   (seal)

                      LONG ISLAND STATE PARK COMMISSION
                           BELMONT LAKE STATE PARK
                            BABYLON, L. I., N. Y.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL C.R. BLAKELOCK AT BABYLON lOOO OR BABYLON 1178


                                                             April 4, 1939

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

                       Eighty-five rowboats are being made available for
the opening of the fishing station at Jones Beach State Park on Saturday,
April 15th.  It has been rumored that flounders are beginning to arrive in
the Great South Bay and should be plentiful within a week or so.

                      Rowboats, bait, fishing tackle and accessories may be
obtained at the fishing station between 8 A.M. and 6 P.M. from April 15th to
May 26th and between 6 A.M. and sunset beginning May 27th.

                      There is no charge made for parking at Jones Beach
until May 27th.  Boats may be rented for 25 cents an hour or $1.00 per day.

                                    END.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              April 7, 1939


                  The Department of Parks announces that the Board of
Education is cooperating in combatting vandalism in parks.

                  The following are copies of correspondence between
the two Departments.
                                      
                          THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                           DEPARTMENT OF PARKS

                                ARSENAL
                      64th STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE
                              CENTRAL PARK
                              HEW YORK CITY

                             March 25, 1939


Dr. Harold G. Campbell
Superintendent of Schools
500 Park Avenue
New York City

"Dear Dr. Campbell:

         With the Easter vacation drawing near I think it would be opportune
to make another plea to the school children of the city through your General
Circular, in behalf of parks and playgrounds.

         Each year we have found that the few days of Easter vacation, coming
at a time when frost is just out of the ground and growing things are just
budding, have produced more damage to parks in general than a whole month
during any other period in the year. Of course we can sympathize with the
school children who have been cooped up all winter and are suddenly released
into an out-of-doors which is more inviting than it has been since the
preceding summer. I request that you include in your next circular, or if
none is to be published before the Easter vacation starts, in a special
circular, a request substantially as follows:


         'Every spring the Park Department faces the problem of dressing up
the city's parks and playgrounds and putting them into condition for public
use during the summer. The ground is soft and growing things have started to
bud. Lawns are damaged by anyone walking on them and buds once knocked off of
trees and shrubs will not renew themselves until the following year. Damage
of this kind cannot be repaired immediately and becomes a blot on the park
landscape all through the summer,

         'It is only natural for school children to spend their spring
vacation outdoors and preferably in parks and playgrounds. The Park
Department has done everything it can to provide areas suitable and adequate
for active recreation for all the city's children. Some sections of the city
may not have as many of these facilities as they should and this lack will be
taken care of as fast as funds are made available. In the meantime the city's
children must be educated to understand that if they play on a lawn today,
they and all their neighbors and relatives will have no lawn there during the
summer. Instead, they will have plain dirt. They should be made to realize
that the parks were not made for them only, and that they should recognize
the rights of others and should leave park developments intact for other
people to use.

         'All park playgrounds are supervised by trained personnel whose job
it is to see that the facilities available are used to the best advantage of
all.

          'Children should also understand that although their parents may
not own their homes and pay real estate taxes to the city, they are still
paying taxes every time they buy anything including food, medicine, and the
other essentials not subject to the sales tax, and that these taxes are used
in part in maintenance and repair of parks and playgrounds.  The damage to
the city's parks and playgrounds during the past year, resulting from
careless use and wilful vandalism, amounted to a quarter of a million
dollars.  The extra cost of repairs and maintenance on account of this damage
could be put into additional play facilities for everyone to use if the few
who do the damage would use the playgrounds properly and leave them undamaged
for others to enjoy.'

                      Very truly yours,
                          / s / Allyn R, Jennings
                                General Superintendent"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             BOARD OF EDUCATION
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                                  OFFICE OF
                        THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
                               500 PARK AVENUE
                               March 31, 1939


Mr. Allyn R. Jennings
General Superintendent
Department of Parks
64th Street and Fifth Avenue
New York, N. Y.

"My dear Superintendent:

                   In accordance with your request I have again sent out a
General Circular asking the teachers and pupils to cooperate with the
Department of Parks in the manner outlined in your letter to me.

                   Very truly yours,

                   /s/     Harold G. Campbell

                    Superintendent of Schools"


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              April 6, 1939


      The Department of Parks announces that the historic Claremont Inn built
in 1806, and recognized as one of New York's landmarks on Riverside Drive
north of Grant's Tomb will reopen at noon on Saturday, April 8th.

      Luncheon will be $1,00, dinner $1.50 and up, special supper $1.00, and
breakfast on Sundays until 1 P.M., 50 cents and up.

      The interior has been redecorated and the tree shaded outdoor dining
terrace with its gay sun umbrellas overlooking the Hudson River, will be much
more attractive than in former years.  Entertainment in the form of music and
dancing will be provided nightly.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              April 6, 1939

                     EASTER FLOWER SHOW - PROSPECT PARK

            The Park Department announces the opening of the Annual Easter
Flower Show at the Greenhouses in Prospect Park (Prospect Park West and 7th
Street, Brooklyn) Good Friday, April 7th, at 10 A.M.  The show will be open
to the public each day thereafter for three weeks from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.

            The exhibit this year is one of the finest of these annual shows.
More than 300 varieties of flovrers are represented by 10,000 blooms.  The
main feature of the show is a hugh cross 30 feet high, made of 4,000 pure
white Bermuda lilies edged with beautiful light blue Cinerarias, banked with
Genistas, Shower of Gold Plant and pink Rhododendrons.  Leading to the steps
of the cross is a grass path through a sunken garden.  In the garden are 200
varieties of Azaleas,

            An added feature of the show this year is a Trylon and Perisphere
at the opposite end of the show house from the cross.  The Trylon, 18 feet
high, is made of white Lilies and the Perisphere, 6 feet in diameter, of
light pink Coral Bell Azaleas.

            As a background for the central motive, the walls of the
greenhouse are banked with a colorful display of flowers in great varieties,
among which Cineraries, Calceolarias, Sweet Peas, Snapdragons, Lilacs,
Flowering Crab-Apples, Peach and Cherries predominate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                April 3, 1939

Hon. Grover Whalen
World's Fair, N.Y.

Dear Grover:

        Since you spoke to me yesterday I checked up on the matter of the
sign proposed to be put up by Billy Rose on the State Amphitheatre.

        There must be a complete misunderstanding on this subject because the
sign in question does not at all follow your description.  There are in fact
three signs, on in the center fifteen feet high by fifty-five feet long with
the legend "Billy Rose's Aquacade", and two smaller signs six feet high by
fifty feet long at the two extremities of the horseshoe, bearing the legend
"Aquacade" and facing northeast and northwest.

        Construction of these signs would be an outrageous violation of law
and agreement and would be something we should have to oppose strenously. I
should feel it my duty among other things to discuss the matter with the
Governor because of his interest in the State Building. After all, the State
is constructing at great expense a permanent building on agreement with the
City and incidentally with the Fair. This building is supposed to advertise
the State's contribution and the State's interest. It is not Billy Rose's
building. It is the permanent State Amphitheatre.

        It seems to me there should be an immediate conference on this
subject before the matter gets out of hand becomes a subject of public
criticism and discussion.

        I would suggest that arrangements be made to have this matter taken
up with your design committee by our committee on basic improvements.

                                    Yery truly yours,

                                     /s/  ROBERT MOSES

                                          Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              April 2, 1939


                  The Department of Parks announces that the ten municipal
golf courses will open on Saturday morning, April 8, at 6 A.M.  Work is
progressing on the courses to place them in playing condition for opening.

                  On the Clearview Golf Course where fifteen new greens were
built last Fall, only three permanent greens will be open for play.  However,
the remaining twelve new greens are coming along rapidly and it is possible
that they may be in use during the month of June.  The nine other courses
will open with all permanent greens, with the exception of Pelham, where one
temporary green will be in play.

                  Permits are on sale at the five borough offices
located at:

        Manhattan           The Arsenal
                            64 Street & Fifth Avenue
                            New York City

        Bronx:              Bronx Park East & Birchall Avenue
                            Bronx, New York

        Brooklyn:           Litchfield Mansion
                            Prospect Park
                            Brooklyn, New York

        Queens:             The Overlook
                            Union Turnpike & Park Lane
                            Forest Park, Kew G-ardens, L. I.
        Richmond            Clove Lakes Park, Victory Boulevard
                                 and Clove Road
                            Staten Island, New York

                  Permits went on sale the 1st of March and through
March 31, 1544 golf permits have been sold.

                  It is expected that with good weather the clay tennis
courts will open on April 15.  The hard surface courts have been open since
March 15 and have been receiving a large amount of play.  The tennis permits
have been on sale since the 1st of March also and 1179 tennis permits have
been sold.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         139 STREET AND LENOX AVENUE

                                APRIL 1, 1939

                                 12:45 P. M.


                          BAND SELECTIONS

                          Hon. Robert Moses, Chairman
                                Commissioner of Parks

                          Bill Robinson
                                Mayor of Harlem
                          Col. Brehon B. Somervell
                                W. P. A. Administrator
                          Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs, President
                                Borough of Manhattan
                          Hon. A. Newbold Morris, President
                                City Council

                          CALL TO COLORS

                          PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

                          NATIONAL ANTHEM

                          BAND SELECTIONS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               HARLEM HOUSING
                        SEVENTH AVENUE AND 150 STREET

                                APRIL 1, 1939

                                 12:00 NOON

                        BAND SELECTIONS

                        Hon. Robert Moses, Chairman
                              Commissioner of Parks

                        Bill Robinson
                              Mayor of Harlem

                        Hon. John H. Delaney, Chairman
                              Board of Transportation

                        Col. Brehon B. Somervell
                              W. P. A. Administrator

                        Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs, President
                              Borough of Manhattan

                        Hon. A, Newbold Morris, President
                              City Council

                        NATIONAL ANTHEM

                        Start Parade to 139 Street and
                              Lenox Avenue, with bands,
                              children, troops and mounted
                              police escorts

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         139 STREET AND LENOX AVENUE

                                APRIL 1, 1939

                                 12:45 P. M.


                          BAND SELECTIONS

                          Hon. Robert Moses, Chairman
                                Commissioner of Parks

                          Bill Robinson
                                Mayor of Harlem

                          Col. Brehon B. Somervell
                                W. P. A. Administratcr

                          Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs, President
                                Borough of Manhattan

                          Hon. A. Newbold Morris, President
                                City Council

                          CALL TO COLORS

                          PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

                          NATIONAL ANTHEM

                          BAND SELECTIONS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 31, 1939

        The New York City Parkway Authority, of which Commissioner Robort
Moses is the Sole Member, announces that the final span of tho new westerly
roadway of Cross Bay Parkway Bridge, connecting Broad Channel with the
Rockaways, was set in place at 4 P.M., Thursday, March 30, 1939.  This
installation placed a rather unique problem before the general contractors,
Johnson, Drake & Piper, inasmuch as vehicular traffic over Cross Bay Parkway
had to be maintained while the span was being placed. The span, which weighed
150 tons, was constructed on shore by the American Bridge Company,
subcontractors for Johnson, Drake & Piper. Arrangements wore made with
Morritt, Chapman & Scott to take the span from its place of erection,
approximately one mile away from the Parkway, by means of their derrick-boat,
the "Monarch," to the bridge where the span was carefully lowered into
place. This entire operation started at approximately 1 P.M., and the span
was permanently placed by 4 P.M., without disrupting vehicular traffic.

        At 7 P.M. vehicular traffic was cut off at both ends of the Cross Bay
Parkway in order to allow time for the placing of the permanent roadway
grating on this span and the installation of two concrete panels. Thirty men
worked all night welding the grating floor to the span and pouring the
concrete. At exactly 5 A.M., March 31st, the new west roadway of Cross Bay
Parkway was placed in operation for vehicular traffic.

        From an engineering standpoint this operation was of great interest,
inasmuch as it was necessary to obtain one of the largest derrick-boats in
the East and to place 250 tons of ballast on the offside of the derrick-boat
in order to float the span from the shore to its final place in the viaduct
structure.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 31, 1939


                  Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal in Central Park for the construction of two of the five bridges
necessary to provide adequately for the free flow of traffic at the
intersection of Cross Island Parkway with Grand Central Parkway and
Winchester Boulevard.

                  This contract provides for the reconstruction of the
existing bridge which now carries Grand Central Parkway over Winchester
Boulevard.  Another span will be added to this bridge which when completed
will carry westbound Grand Central Parkway traffic over Cross Island Parkway.
Winchester Boulevard will be relocated westerly of its existing position and
its traffic will be carried under the west bound Grand Central Parkway
traffic by means of the second bridge to be built under this contract.

                  Contracts for the construction of the Belt Parkway are
being let at an accelerating pace.  Today's letting is the fourth of a series
of Belt Parkway contracts which were opened this week, making a total of
twenty to be let since the project was approved on October 13, 1938,

                  The work under the contract is to be completed on
or before November 30, 1939.

                  The three low bids were:

       The Immick Co, Inc,
       50 Church Street, N. Y. C.                              $269,360.50

       Sarofano Construction Co., Inc.
       420 Lexington Avenue, N.Y.C.                             279,874,50

       J. Leopold and Co.
       60 East 42 Street, N. Y. C                               280,579.95


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 31, 1939


                 The Department of Parks announces that exercises in
connection with the opening of two playgrounds in Manhattan, one at 150
Street and Seventh Avenue (Harlem Housing) and the other at 139 Street and
Lenox Avenue will be held on Saturday, April 1.

                 A. Newbold Morris, President of the City Council, Borough
President Stanley M. Isaacs, Colonel Brehon B. Somervell, Works Progress
Administrator and Bill Robinson, Stage and Screen Star, will take part as
speakers at both locations, with Commissioner Moses acting as Chairman.  In
addition to these speakers Hon. John H. Delaney, Chairman of the Board of
Transportation will participate at 150 Street.

                At the conclusion of the ceremonies at the Harlem Housing
site, all the participants including a detachment of troops from the 369
Infantry N.Y.N.G., the Monarch Elks Band and Park Department Band and
approximately 1000 neighborhood children will parade led by a mounted police
escort to the playground at Lenox Avenue and 139 Street.

                 The 150 Street and Seventh Avenue area obtained by the
Department of Parks from the Board of Transportation for an indefinite period
has been developed to include 8 tennis courts, 9 handball courts, a volley
ball court as well as a sitting area for mothers and guardians of small
children. The sitting area is surrounded by continuous rows of benches under
shade trees with two separate sand pits for youngsters to play in.  This area
is adjacent to the play area opened at the Harlem Housing site on November
26, 1937.

            The area located on the west side of Lenox Avenue between 139 and
140 Streets is adjacent to Public School 139, Manhattan and was the first
parcel of ground purchased jointly by the Park Department and the Board of
Education and developed in collaboration to the advantage of both
departments.  Besides being completely equipped with play apparatus the area
also provides facilities for handball, basketball, paddle tennis, roller
skating hockey and ice skating in the winter when subfreezing temperatures
permit.

            At both locations brick comfort stations have been provided.

            These two areas make a total of 275 playgrounds which have been
added, to the Park system since January 1934.  The total number available
today is 383.

            The work in connection with the construction of both these areas
was performed by the Works Progress Administration, but planned and inspected
by the Department of Parks.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 29, 1939


                  Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal in Central Park for the construction of another section of Cross
Island Parkway from Stewart Avenue to 104th Avenue, including the
construction of a grade separation structure at Hempstead Avenue.

                  This structure, a double span stone faced concrete bridge,
will carry traffic on Hempstead Avenue over the Parkway.

                  To date, nineteen contracts have been let for the
construction of the Belt Parkvtfay, which is being jointly financed by the
City of New York and the Federal Public Works Administration.  The total cost
of these contracts is $9,500,000 or 38% of the entire project.

                  The work under the contract is to be completed on or before
October 1, 1939.

                  The three low bidders were:

         National Excavation Corporation
         10 East 40th Street, N. Y. C.           $313,260.50

         J. Leopold & Company
         60 East 42nd Street, N. Y. C,            314,060.50

         Andrew Weston, Inc.
         Woodmere, L. I.                          314,382,00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 29, 1939



                  The Department of Parks announces that in conjunction with
the Borough President of Manhattan, the Police Department and the Board of
Transportation, plans are being prepared for the complete rehabilitation of
Greeley and Herald Squares at 32 and 35 Streets and Sixth Avenue, The removal
of the Sixth Avenue "El" between those streets, and the approaching
completion of the Sixth Avenue Subway present an opportunity not only for the
solution of difficult traffic problems but also an especially worthwhile
civic improvement.

                  Nowhere along the route of the "El" will the demoliion of
the structure do more to improve the appearance of a neighborhood than at
Greeley and Herald Squares.  The improvement will include the enlargement of
Herald Square and reconstruction of both of the two triangles together with
the installation of a narrow center mall as a traffic separator between 33
and 34 Streets; new paving, wrought iron fences, landscaping and the
relocation of the Horace Greeley Monument in the development of Greeley
Square.

                  It is also planned to bring back the old Bell Ringers and
Clock group which James Gordon Bennett had on top of the old Herald Building.
This interesting group, a relic of old New York, will be restored on a
monumental base at the north end of the enlarged plot.  The construction will
proceed with Relief forces as soon as the removal of the "El" structure and
subway construction permit.

                  The Bennett clock and its appurtenances, part of the James
Arthur collection of time pieces owned by New York University, has been
permanently loaned to the City with the Department of Parks as custodian,
with the sole provision that, if Herald Square should, in the future, be used
for other than park purposes, the group will be returned to the University.

                  Business organizations and property owners in the vicinity
of Herald Square, aware that an imaginative service near their places of
business or property is a sound investment, are helping toward this
improvement by contributing funds which will be used for items of work such
as the repair and installation of the Bell Ringers, which the Works Progress
Administration cannot do.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 28, 1939


             Motorists in Brooklyn and Queens traveling along existing
highways adjacent to the Belt Parkway will be apprised of its location by
means of signs to be erected along its route at the intersection of the
Parkway with all important traffic arteries.

             Bids on a contract for the erection of these signs were opened
today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal in Central Park.

             The low bidder was:

             M. Barash
             2132 Ocean Avenue
             Brooklyn, New York     $3,300.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 27, 1939


              Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal in Central Park for the grading of Cross Island Parkway, from 41st
Avenue through Alley Pond Park to Grand Central Parkway and for paving the
Parkway between 46th Avenue and the same terminus.

              Included in this contract is work necessary tp construct an
embankment for the temporary detour of the Long Island Railroad tracks north
of Northern Boulevard and also an embankment to provide a detour road at
Northern Boulevard.  These detours will remain in place during the
construction of bridges at these points under another contract.

              The contract on which bids were opened today is one of four
contracts to be let this week for the construction of the Belt Parkway.
Sixteen contracts have been previously awarded on this project, which is
being jointly financed by the City of New York and the Federal Public Works
Administration.

              Work under this contract is to be completed on
or before December 30, 1939.

              The three low bidders were:

     Andrew Weston, Inc.                   $354,655.00
     Woodmere, Long Island

     Tuckahoe Construction Company         368,020.00
     Tuckahoe, New York

     Johnson, Drake and Piper              374,395.00
     Freeport, Long Island

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 23, 1939


                 The Department of Parks announces that today there is coming
up on the Board of Estimate Calendar the approval for changing the map or
plan of the City of New York by laying out as a public park the property
adjacent to the public bath building on Rivington Street West of Margin
Street, Borough of Manhattan; also requesting the Board to authorize the
acquisition by condemnation of privately owned property within the area shown
on the map as a public park, and to authorize the acceptance from Mr. Bernard
Baruch of three parcels of property purchased by him at the cost of $63,500
and a cash gift of $21,500 as the condemnation fund for the acquisition by
the City of three parcels of land which Mr.  Baruch could not purchase at
private sale.

                 The old public bath building erected some years ago was
named after Dr. Simon Baruch who pioneered in establishing health and bath
facilities in the City.  This structure is hemmed in on both sides by
tenements and it was impossible in the rehabilitation program already under
way with the cooperation of the Works Progress Administration, to provide
adequate light and air for the structure or to provide any open space
adjacent to it. Mr. Bernard Baruch, a son of Dr. Baruch, generously offered
to acquire the adjacent property, so as to greatly improve the convenience of
the building and provide a proper setting for it which he has already done
except for three parcels necessary to round out the plot.

                 Plans for the proper reconstruction of the old bath building
have been modified so as to provide additional windows, ventilation, light,
etc. and, generally speaking, the expanded area will provide a small
neighborhood landscaped park for women and children; quiet game tables for
adults; a sand pit and shower basin for children, and adequate benches under
shade trees.

                 The City Council will be requested to change the name of
Goerick Street, which is six blocks long, to Baruch Street.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 22, 1939


                 Three more bridges on the Belt Parway were placed on the
"under construction" schedule when bids were opened today at the Arsenal in
Central Park for the construction of grade separations on Cross Island
Parkway at the main line of the Long Island Railroad, at the Belmont Spur of
the Long Island Railroad and at Superior Road, together with the paving of
the parkway, between Jamaica Avenue and Hempstead Avenue.

                 To date, sixteen contracts have been let for the
construction of the Belt Parkway, which is being jointly financed by the City
of New York and the Federal Public Works Administration.

                 The work now under contract on this project, which was
approved on October 13, 1938 provides for the grading of eighteen miles of
the thirty-two mile parkway, six miles of completed paving and the
construction of twenty-one of the required sixty-two bridges.

                 Included in today's letting were two steel bridges with
stone faced approaches to provide grade separations at both the main line and
the Belmont Spur of the Long Island Railroad where they intersect the Cross
Island Parkway, and a stone faced concrete structure to carry traffic on
Superior Road over the parkway.

                 Detours will be constructed at the railroad bridges in order
to provide for continuous railroad operation at all times.

                 The work under this contract is to be completed on or before
April 1, 1940.

                 The three low bidders were:

        National Excavation Corporation
        10 East 40th Street, New York City          $718,250.

        Wilson & English
        50 Church Street, New York City              720,075.

        P.J. Carlin
        405 Lexington Avenue, New York City          725,691.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 21, 1939


                       Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at
the Arsenal in Central Park for the construction of three bridges located at
160th Street, Utopia Parkway and Cross Island Boulevard on the Cross Island
section of the Belt Parkway System.

                       The 160th Street Bridge, a two-span steel
superstructure with stone faced approaches will carry the 160th Street
traffic over the Parkway.  At Utopia Parkway traffic will be carried over the
Parkway by means of a two-span stone faced concrete structure, and at Cross
Island Boulevard, a three-span stone faced bridge will carry traffic over
both the Parkway and the South Service Road.

                       With the letting of this contract 18 of the 62 bridges
to be built on the Belt Parkway, which is being jointly financed by the City
of New York and the Federal Public Works Administration, will be under
construction.

                       The work under this contract will be completed
on or before September 16, 1939.

                       The three low bidders were:

          Elmhurst Contracting Co.
          53-04 97th Place, Corona, L. I.            $329,010.25
          National Excavation Corp,

          10 East 42nd Street, N. Y. C.               339,858,00

          Johnson, Drake and Piper
          Freeport, L. I., N. Y.                      343,772.00

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                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                                                      WILLIAM R. C. WOOD
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                                                      JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                       
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         

                                                            March 18, 1939


MEMORANDUM TO COMMISSIONER MOSES

SUBJECT:   BATTERY-BROOKLYN BRIDGE: BATTERY PARK


            In regard to the attached development plan for Battery Park which
shows its proposed improvement in connection with the Battery-Brooklyn
Bridge, we believe that the new layout is so superior to the existing
conditions that it is unnecessary to go into any detail along those lines,
and we therefore limit this memorandum to a discussion of the new plan.

            As to the bridge structure itself, we are certain that instead of
being a detriment, it will, on the other hand, provide a strong architectural
background to the park in the form of a monumental colonnade.  The fact that
the structure is carried considerably above the ground on graceful
stone-faced piers insures that there will be no appreciable loss of sunlight
and air.  There is absolutely no foundation in fact to the opinion that the
bridge and anchorage will interfere with the skyline of lower Manhattan.

            The skyline will continue to dominate and the bridge and
anchorage will be incidental to the lower stories of the lower buildings
flanking State and Whitehall Streets, Unfortunately, the buildings
surrounding the park, including the Customs House, are so heterogeneous in
character that had we to study the park from the beginning, and solely from
the standpoint of a proper approach to New York City, we would surround it
with a colonnade, which the approach serves to a large extent.

            As to the connection between the West Side Highway and South
Street, two divided roadways, each 24 foet in width providing for two lanes
of traffic in each direction, are located, for the most part, directly
beneath the bridge approach, diverging from this alignment only as they near
Whitehall Street over which they will be carried by a permanent structure so
as not to interfere with the local ferry traffic. You will also note that
these roadways are carried underneath Battery Place and are depressed through
the park as much as the existing subway structures allow. The profile of this
connection provides a fortunate solution to tha pedestrian problem, as it
permits access to the east end of the park underneath the elevated portion,
while the pedestrians from the intersection of Broadway, Battery Place and
State Straet, the most popular entrance to the park today, will be led
directly to the Aquarium, to the water-front, or to South Ferry by a path
system converging on a spacious pedestrian crossing over the East Side-West
Side connection.

          We feel that this connection between the East Side and West Side is
the best of any that have been proposed.  In connection with the tunnel
scheme, the Borough President of Manhattan had suggested an elevated highway,
on reverse-curve alignment, between Battery Place and Whitehall Street while
the Consulting Engineer to the West Side Association of Commerce proposed
that this elevated highway be carried around an extended water-front. The New
York City Tunnel Authority made no provision for uninterrupted traffic from
the East Side to the Wast Side in its proposed plan.

          Ths most striking foature of the plan is the addition of 122,000
square feet or 2-4/5 acres that will be added to ths park by the two acre
extension seaward of the present water-front promenade, in addition to
four-fifths of an acre provided by the elimination of excess pavement in
Battary Place now used only for parking.  In connection with the approach
ramps between Washington and Greenwich Streets, north of Battery Place, three
times as many cars may be parked as are now able to use Battery Place. The
park area given over to the East Side-West Side connection, the anchorage and
the approach totals less than 2-2/5 acres, leaving a net gain in park land of
approximately a half acre. It is interesting to note, in this regard, that
the Battery has had four successive increases in area since the days of the
earliest settlers, ITe attach a map which shows the old-shore-line of
Manhattan Island in 1680 which indicates that the whole of the present
Battery Park is land made by subsequent filling operations. The Battery
itself was begun in 1690 and stood until 1790 and the sea wall and promenade,
which extended the tip of the Island about 125 feat, was started in 1790 and
formed the limits of the park until 1848.  It was not until 1872 that the
Battery was extended out to fill in the gap to tha Aquarium, which up to that
time had been reached by a foot-bridge 140 feet long, and to provide the
present upland between the Aquarium and the Barge Office and between the
Aquarium and Whitehall Building.  The present esplanade and and excursion
boat landing was not built until 1931. The new two-level promenade will
provide the finest vantage point in New York City to the crowds who are
attracted to the Battery because of its view of the harbor, being more
extensive than the presnnt promenade and offering superior accommodations to
excursion steamers and their passengers as well is to the sight-seers. The
existing layout of the quay is inadequate for those who desire a glimpse of
the harbor and its ships, for their view is too often cut off by the throngs
waiting to board the excursion boats. By the creation of the upper level the
spectator will look over the heads of those on the lower landing stage.

          The upper level, 30 feet wide, is reached by series of steps and
extends from the Aquarium to the Barge Office Slip.  It will be backed up by
a grove of trees in whose shade minor paths, bench-lined, will afford a much
greater area for the relaxation of the noon-day crowds than exists today. At
about the center of the water-front promenade, a wide plaza is introduced.
Dominated by the relocated flag pole which has long been a Battery land-mark,
this plaza will afford a fitting site for ceremonial receptions to
distinguished guests, while on either side of the area will be flanking park
buildings to serve the visitors.  One, the Consolidated Ticket Office for
excursion steamers, is left in its present location.  On the other side will
be relocated the restaurant concession now standing in the middle of the
park.

          On the landward side of the grove of-trees will be a great
oval-shaped lawn, five acres in extent, around the edges of which groups of
trees will develop as specimens.  The northern boundary of this lawn will be
formed, by a pathway which will connect Battery Place with South Ferry.  The
Aquarium itself will be given a dignified approach more in keeping with its
remodeled facade, A tree-lined mall, leading from the Aquarium to the
pedestrian bridge over the East Side-Wast Side connection, will provide this
setting. At the north end of the mall will be relocated the fine status of
Verrazzano.

           Other monuments in the park, of which there are many, haphazardly
located at present, will be appropriately relocated throughout the park.
Other changes will be the rebuilding of the present unsatisfactory Battery
Place comfort station; a new fire-boat station at the westerly end of the
water-front promenade to replace the present ramshackle building, and a new
service building at the easterly end of the same promenade.

            It is interesting to note that the new scheme, which will provide
not only a more attractive park but which will afford greater use to the park
public, has 10,000 square yards less concrete and asphalt path area than
exists in the park today and instead of the present meager number of trees,
the new plan provides a total of 775 trees, or two and one half times the
number existing. There will also be thirteen acres of lawn area as compared
with the eleven acres existing today.

            In conclusion, we submit that the plan for the construction
of this bridge approach along the northern edge of the park and the
park reconstruction made necessary by this structure will very definitely
improve the appearance of lower Manhattan as seen from the great water
approach of the upper bay, and will likewise, by the effect of the
open colonnade, enhance the appearance of the park from the pcint of
view of its visitors.

                      /s/ Allyn R. Jennings
                           General Supsrintandent

                      /s/ Aymar Embury II
                           Consulting Architect

                      /s/ Gilmore D. Clarke
                           Consulting Landscape Architect


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 18, 1939


               The Department of Parks announces the completion and opening
of two new playgrounds in Brooklyn on Saturday, March 18, 1939.

               One, located at 10th Avenue between 42nd and 43rd Streets, is
equipped with swings, see-saws, slides, jungle gym, wading pool with
removable basket ball backboards and an open play area for group games.

               The other at 18th Avenue between 82nd and 83rd Streets is
equipped with swings, see-saws, jungle gym, slides and a shower basin which
can also be used as a roller skating rink.  This playground is directly
adjacent to and will serve as an adjunct to Milestone Park which is a sitting
area.

               Both are provided with brick comfort stations with facilities
for boys and girls and the areas are paved with bituminous asphalt.
Permanent concrete benches and shade trees are included in the landscape
treatment.

               These two playgrounds make a total of 273 which have been
added to the Park Department's recreational system since January 1934, The
total number available today is 381.

               The work in connection with the construction was performed by
the Works Progress Administration but planned and inspected by the Department
of Parks.

                                   # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 13, 1939


                Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks, at the
Arsenal, in Central Park for the grading of the Southern Parkway section of
the Belt Parkway and the Paving of the North Service Road between Baisley
Boulevard and the Rockaway Branch of the Long Island Railroad, a distance of
two and a half miles.

               With the letting of this contract the work under construction
amounts to $7,777,000 or 31% of the total estimated cost of the Belt Parkway
Project which is being financed jointly by the Federal Public Works
Administration and the City of New York.

                The contract on which bids were taken today is the 14th of a
total of 52 to be let for the entire project and provides for the grading of
the entire right of way of Southern Parkway, between the limits mentioned
above and also includes the work required to adequately protect the conduits
and structures of the Department of Water Supply which run through this right
of way.

                In order to maintain traffic while the grading work is in
operation, the contractor will be required to grade and permanently pave the
North Service Road before traffic is interrupted on the present Sunrise
Highway.  The north service road will then be used as a detour while work is
in progress on the remainder of the project.

                The work under this contract is to be completed on or before
October 1, 1939.

                The three low bidders were:

                Tomosetti Construction Co., Inc.         $ 993,030.00
                1066 60th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

                Poirier & McLane                           999,847.00
                33 Test 42nd Street, N.Y., N.Y.

                Johnson, Drake & Piper                   1,017,720.00
                Freeport, L. I., N.Y.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 10, 1939


               Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal, in Central Purk for the construction of another portion of Cross
Island Parkway from Hempstead Turnpike to Linden Boulevard in the Borough of
Qveens, approximately one and half miles in length.

               This contract is the thirteenth to be let for the construction
of the new Belt Parkway in Brooklyn and Queens, which is being jointly
financed by the City of New York and the Federal Public Works Atministration.

               The work consists of the construction of two grade separation
structures, one at 115th Avenue and one at Linden Boulevard and the paving of
the Parkway and west service road between Hempstead Turnpike and Linden
Boulevard.

               Parkway traffic will be carried over 115th Avenue by means of
a single span steel structure with stone facing, and Linden Boulevard traffic
will be carried ever the Parkway by means of a double span, stone faced
reinforced concrete structure.

               The work is to be completed on or before December 1, 1939.

               The three low bidders were:

Good Roads Engineering and Contracting Co.            $597,794.45
           Wantagh, L. I.

The Immick Company, Inc.                               608,279.00
           50 Church Street, N. Y. C.

Johnson, Drake and Piper                               609,784.50
           Freeport, N. Y.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              March 5, 1939


         The Park Department announces that permit for the planting of eight
large elm trees 50' high and 18" in diameter along the West Side of Fifth
Avenue from 49 to 51 Streets, Manhattan, has been issued to Rockefeller
Center, Inc. It is expected that the actual planting will start on Wednesday,
March 8.

         This year the Department has again prepared for extensive planting
within parks and along parkways. However, while jurisdiction over street
trees is also one of its functions, the departoent has only funds with which
to rehabilitate park and parkway areas, and street treo planting will depend
entirely upon the initiative and willingness of civic-minded property owners
or civic organizations to beautify their respective neighborhoods.  The
planting on Fifth Avenue by Rockefeller Center, Inc. is the most outstanding
contribution of this kind yet made by a private property owner.  But its
magnitude should not discourage the average home owner from taking a similar
though necessarily more modest step toward improving his own property and
street.  Thousands of street trees, destroyed by the hurricano of last fall,
cannot be replaced unless property owners are sufficiently interested to
plant at their own expense.

         The best planting season is right at hand; the safest season for
tree planting is from the time the frost leaves the ground early in March
until about May 15th. It is none too soon to plan for this work now, as the
earlier a tree is planted the more likely it is to endure the heat of summer.

         The Park Department especially fosters the planting of street trees
a block or more at a time, resulting in much more uniform and beautiful
plantings than could be obtained by individual property owners working alone.
Upon request a departmental landscape architect consults with and advises
property owners and civic groups who wish to sponsor co-operative planting,
the department obtains all necessary permits; suggests suitable tree
varieties; gives full instructions for, and supervises planting; and aids in
all possible ways other than furnishing materials or labor.

         For this special service requests should be addressed to the Park
Dopartment general headquarters at The Arsenal, 64 Street and Fifth Avenue,
New York City.  Tree planting permits, planting advice, and supervision are
also obtainable from the borough offices, located as follows:

       Manhattan      -     The Arsenal, 64 St. & Fifth Avenue

       Brooklyn       -     Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park

       Bronx          -     Bronx Park East at Birchall Avenue

       Queens         -     The Overlook, Forest Park

       Richmond       -     Clove Lakes Field House, West New Brighton


       The hurricane taught a valuable lesson.  Over 70% of the street trees
destroyed by the wind were of unsatisfactory varieties prohibited in Park
Department regulations.  The Department does not approve of many varieties of
trees now growing on city streets, such as poplar, silver maple, box elder,
black locust, horse chestnut, Chinese elm, mountain ash, beech, birch,
catalpa, willow, sugar maple, dogwood and hornboam.  When any of these trees
die or are removed for any cause, they may be replaced only with trees on the
approved list, which includes: pin oak, red oak, scarlet oak, American elm,
European elm, sweet gum, European ash, linden, Norway maple, honey locust,
Oriental plane, tulip and gingko.

       The approved trees for city planting are those which are adapted for
the peculiar conditions of the city for tree growth and those most
economically maintained. Most of the undesirable trees found on city streets
are fast-growing ones planted privately to obtain a comparatively quick
effect when the Park Department did not exorcise the control it now doos over
street tree planting.

        The tree planting permits required by the Park Department are issued
free of charge, and application at any Borough office will bring all
necessary forms and information.

        Last year 667 street trees were planted by property owners using a
standard form of contract and specifications drawn up by the Park Department,
and their more frequont use by the general public is encouraged.  Results in
every case were gratifying to all concerned.

        However, this scarcely scratched the surface, particularly in
residential sections, where poplars and silver maples were abundant before
the storm, and it is hoped that with spring and the tree planting season just
around the corner, citizens will call for the help so willingly offered, thus
doing their bit to beautify their neighborhoods before the opening of the
World's Fair.

                                    ####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              March 3, 1939


            The Bronx Playgrounds Operetta and Orchestral Clubs, sponsored
by the Department of Parks, will present Gilbert and Sullivan's popular
operetta, "The Mikado", at Mullaly Recreation Building, E. 165th Street
and Jerome Avenue, Friday and Saturday, March 10th and 11th, at 8:15 P.M.

           There are sixty-five members in the Operetta Club and thirty in
the Orchestral Club. The entire ensemble average approximately sixteen years
of age. The entire production is being trained, staged and costumed by the
Bronx Recreation Division, Department of Parks. Another broadcast is to be
given over station WNYC, Sunday, March 5th, 3 P.M.

           Those taking the principal-characters are:

           The Mikado of Japan*               Robert Kennedy

           Nanki Pooh*                        Jonas Rimson

           Ko-Ko                              Charles Fremed

           Pooh-Bah.                          Morris Gershenwitz

           Pish-Tush                          Lawrence Rosenthal

           Yum-Yum*                           Lena Rogoft

           Pitti-Sing*                        Beverly Auerbach

           Peep-Bo*                           Edythe Schrager

           Katisha*                           Sara Post

           * March 11th, these parts are being played by Andrew Durie,
           Daniel Eisen, Beverly Auerbach, Constance Boys, Sara Post,
           Edythe Schrager.

           Not to be outdone by their older brothers and sisters a Junior
Operetta and Orchestral Club has been organized.  There are eighty-four
members in the Operetta Club and sixteen in the Orchestral Club.  The average
age of this group is approximately 11-12 years. At present, they are
rehearsing a musical version of Mark Twain's story, "Tom Sawyer". This
combined group of one hundred youngsters will give two performances during
May.  They are anxious to perform and working very hard to make their initial
offering performance.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              March 3, 1939


               Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks, at the
Arsenal in Central Park for the paving of Cross Island Parkway at the
intersection with the Bronx-Whitestone Parkway, Queens.

               This contract for the construction of a portion of the new
Belt Parkway, which is being jointly financed by the City of New York and the
Federal Public Works Administration, provides for a permanent concrete
pavement to take the southbound traffic fron the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge and
a temporary pavement to carry the northbound traffic to the Bridge. The
temporary pavement will serve until the three-level grade separation and its
approaches at this point are completed on December 15, 1939.

               The work under this contract must be completed by
April 25, 1939.

               The three low bidders were:

               Harlom Contracting Co.        $46,542.50
               44 Exchange Placo
               New York City

               J. J. Mattrello               $47,427.00
               1036 - 65th Street
               Brooklyn, N. Y.

               Andrew Woston, Inc.           $48,955.00
               Woodmere, L. I.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          February 16, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that applications for permits to
play golf and tennis on the courses and courts under its supervision will be
received at the following offices starting March 1st:

THE BRONX - Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue
BROOKLYN  - Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park
MANHATTAN - Thee Arsenal, Fifth Avenue and 64 Street, Central Park
QUEENS    - The Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens, Long Island, N.Y.
RICHMOND  - Clove Lakes Park, Victory Boulevard and Clove Road, S. I*

GOLF:


Season Permit  - $5.00 -     Good for play Monday to Friday, inclusive.
                             Permit holders must pay a surcharge of 50˘
                             per round on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

Daily Fee -      $0.75 -     Monday to Friday, inclusive, excepting holidays.
                 $l.00 -     Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

Season Locker -  $5.00
Daily Locker -   $0.25

            Courses on which the golf permits may be used are:

THE BRONX - Van Cortlandt; Mosholu; Pelham; Split Rock
BROOKLYN  - Dyker Beach
QUEENS    - Clearview; Kissena; Forest Park
RICHMOND  - Silver Lake; LaTourette.


            Applicants are required to submit with application, a photograph,
size 1-1/2" x 1-1/2".

            Courses will be opened for play early in April, weather and ground
conditions permitting.

TENNIS:

Season Permit         - $3.00
Season Locker Permit  - $2.00
Daily Locker Permit   -   .25 (for one day only)

                 There are no daily permits for tennis.    Play is limited
to one hour per day where patrons are waiting for a court.

                 Applicants arc required to submit with application, a
photograph, size 1-1/2" x 1-1/2".

                 Hard-surface courts will be open for play on March 15. Clay
courts will be open for play, woathor permitting, April 15.

                 Tennis courts under the jurisdiction of the Department of
Parks are:


                                         MANHATTAN

Name                Location                               Clay    Hard Surface

Central Park        93rd Street & West Drive                 13         17
                    63rd Street & York Avenue                 4

                                         BROOKLYN

Fort Greene         DeKalb Ave. & Washington Park                        6
Gravesend           56th Street & 18th Avenue                            9
Kelly Memorial      Avenue S & East 14th Street               7
Leiv Eiriksson      66th Street & 7th Avenue                            10
M&C-.rron           Lorimer Street & Driggs Avenue                      21
Lincoln Terrace     Eastern Parkway & Buffalo Avenue          8          3
McKinley            75th Street &, 7th Avenue                 5          4
Prospect Park       Prospect Park W. & 9th Street            25
Sunset              Fifth Avenue & 41st Street                           3
Dreamland           Sea Breeze Avenue & W. 5th St.                       8


                                     BRONX

Bronx Park          Brady Avenue & Bronx Park East                       6
Crotona Park        East 173rd S t . & Crotona Avenue        20
Mullaly Park        East 164th Street & Jerome Avenue        15
S t . James Park    East 193rd Street & Jerome Avenue         8          4
St.Mary's Park      East 146th Street & Trinity Avenue        3          3
Van Cort.Pk.East    233rd Street & Jerome Avenue              8
Williamsbridge Oval Bainbridge Avenue & 208th Street                     8


                                    QUEENS

Alley Pond           Grand Central Parkway, No.Blvd.         10          6
Anawanda             Grandview Ave. & Stanhope Street         3
Brookville           Brookville Blvd. & South Conduit                    6
                                 Highway, Rosedale
Crocheron            East of 215th Pl.,S.of 33d Ave.,Bayside            10
Cunningham           Union Turnpike, North of 193rd Street              15
Flushing Memorial    150th St. & Bayside Ave., Flushing       8
Forest Park          Park Lane So. & 89th St.,Woodhaven       7          7
Highland             Jamaica Avenue & Cleveland Street       13         13
Howard Beach         Nolan & Flynn Avenues, Howard Beach      3
Kissena              Rose Street & Oak Ave., Flushing        12
Triborough Bridge
   Approach          Hoyt Ave.,So. & 21st Street                        14
Wayanda              Hollis Ave., Springfield Blvd.,          2
                                   Queens Village   
Playground           48th Street & 30th Ave., Astoria         2
                     89th Ave. & 90th Street, Woodhaven       8


                                    RICHMOND

Walker Park          Bard Avenue, Delafield Place &
                                    Davis Avenue              6         3
Silver Lake          Hart Boulevard, Silver Lake Park         4

                   Additional courts are under construction in Manhattan,
Queens and The Bronx, and will be opened for the use of the public as soon as
completed.  Those courts are located:

                                     MANHATTAN

Highland             Jamaica Avenue & Cleveland Street       13         13

Harlem Housing Plgd  150 St. & 7 Avenue                                  8
East River Park      Delancy St. & East Riv. Dr                         12
West Side            Ft. Washington Park                                10
Randall's Island     South of Triborough Stadium              22
                                                         2 Grass Cts.
Inwood Park          207 S t . & Seaman Ave,                            17

                                       BRONX

Pelham Bay Park      Rice Stadium                                       20
Van Cortlandt Park   Broadway & 241 Street                              16

                                       QUEENS

Tudor Field          No. Conduit Ave, & 80 St.                           6
Liberty Park         172 St. & Liberty Ave.                             10
                                               Total          24        99

                                         Grand Total                   123

                                  # # # # #

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          February 24, 1939


                The rigid requirements of the schedule which calls for the
construction of the thirty-two mile Belt Parkway around Brooklyn and Queens,
before July 1, 1940, were met today "on time" when bids were opened by the
Department of I&rks at the Arsenal, in Central Park for the construction of
another section of Cross Island Parkway from Hillside Avenue to 91st Avenue
in the Borough of Queens.

               The contract will be the eleventh to be awarded since October
13, 1938, the date of approval of this, project which is being jointly
financed by the City of New York and the Federal Public Works Administration,
and brings the total of the work under contract to $6,100,000, or 26% of the
total estimated cost of the project.

                The work under this contract consists of the grading and
paving of a portion of Cross Island Parkway, botwoon the limits mentioned
above, together with service roads along its borders to serve abutting
private property.  Included in the work is a grade separation structure, over
the Creedmoor Branch of the long Island Railroad and an underpass at 88th
Road to give pedestrian safe access from one side of the parkway to the
other.

                The work under the contract is to be completed on November 1,
1939.

                The three low bidders were;

                        National Excavation Corp.        $399,584.50
                        10 East 40 St., N. Y. C.

                        Andrew Weston Construction Co.    411,331.00
                        Woodmore, Long Island

                        Garafano Construction Co.         416,016.00
                        120 Lexington Avenue, N.Y.C.

                                  # # # # #

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          February 16, 1939


TO THE CITY EDITOR:

       Attached for release is a copy of a memorandum on the Department of
Parks 1939-1940 Budget request, a hearing on which will take place in the
office of the Budget Director, Friday morning, February 17 at 10:30 A. M.

Attach.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


                   MEMORANDUM ON 1939-1940 BUDGET REQUEST
                                   FOR THE
                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                              FEBRUARY 9, 1939



          The 1939-1940 budget request of the Department of Parks totals
$12,650,313.20 as compared with the 1938 budget, as modified, of
$9,626,508.55.

          On the basis of present construction schedules added to new wcrk
completed during the past year, the 1939-1940 budget will have to provide for
an increase of 35% in usable park and playground developments.  Active
recreation areas have increased from 870 acres to 1172 acres, and general
park areas developed and put into public use have increased from 9,700 acres
to 13,100 acres.

          The total increase of $3,023,804,65 is made up as follows:


                MAINTENANCE AMD OPERATION - PERSONAL SERVICE

Supervisory

          During the Fall of 1938 a candid, impartial inspection of park
areas and operating personnel determined that the City's parks as a whole can
be rated at 65% of an acceptable standard.  This is 10% lower than the
passing grade on a Civil Service examination.  The outstanding phase of the
work which contributed to this unsatisfactory standard of operation was
supervision.  The present budgetary provision for supervisory personnel in
the department is inadequate in both numbers and titles.  There are now
provided 137 foremen in the budget to direct 4,200 employees, or 31
subordinates for each foreman.  This would be abnormally light evon on a
construction job where all workers aro more or less concentrated.  In parks,
laboring personnel are widely spread and supervision is correspondingly more
difficult.  The present request calls for 172 foremen in various grades to
supervise the work of 4,650 employees, which allows about 27 men per foreman,
which is still rather light.  The total increase in money requested for this
item is $84,000.

Mechanics

         The 1938 budget allowed 170 mechanics in the various trades. On
January 1, 1938 there were in the five boroughs 2,129 work repair orders left
over from 1937. During the year 1938, 12,953 such orders were issued to the
mechanical forces and they completed work on 11,123, leaving a balance at the
first of this year of 3,959.  The majority of these jobs represented
emergency work and the present meagre force, which was supplemented by an
average of 139 laborers, attendants, etc.  working out of title, was entirely
inadequate to cope with even all of the emergencies.  It is obvious that
unless sufficient additional mechanics are provided, the City's recreation
plant will gradually deteriorate beyond the possibility of repair.  The
present request calls for 178 additional mechanics to replace the present
unqualified employees working out of title and to provide enough additional
mechanics to catch up on back work and to take care of new facilities. The
total increase requested for this phase of the work is $272,402.20.

Auto Enginemen

      The department is now operating 439 pieces of automotive equipment and
has requested 86 additional pieces in this budget. The 1938 budget provided
191 auto enginemen which means that there are now at least 250 laborers,
assistant gardeners, climbers and pruners and others working out of title as
auto enginemen. The additional 50 auto enginemen rerequested will not permit
100% operation of equipment by auto enginemen as we do intend to operate
certain of the equipment with other employees, notably the forestry equipment
which will be operated by climbers and pruners as part of their normal work,
The additional funds needed for auto enginemen amount to $35,800.

Forestry and Gardening

         We have in the City along streets and in parks about 2,250,000 trees
for which the department is responsible.  Most of the forestry forces have to
be confined to work on street trees because of the thousands of complaints
from private citizens of the condition of those trees.  At the beginning of
1938 there were 3400 such complaints left over from the preceding year;
during the year 1938, 42,794 wore received and 34,369 cases were taken care
of, leaving a balance at the beginning of this year of 8,425.  These
complaints very seldom apply to an individual tree and frequently involve the
trees in a whole block or even in a section several blocks in area.  From
these figures it is apparent that the present forces are inadequate to keep
up with the work required.  There are still thousands of trees on the City's
streets which are a danger to the public from rot or from broken branches
which may fall at any time on people passing along sidewalks underneath.

          The 1,250,000 trees in the City's parks have received even less
attention; and unless adequate forces are provided for their proper care,
they will deteriorate to such an extent that the parks will have to be
reforested with thousands of new trees over a long period of years.  In
addition to this tree work, last year the department received by transfer
from the various Borough Presidents, hundreds of small triangles and squares
in street areas which are planted with lawns and shrubs.  A small, entirely
inadequate provision was made to take care of these areas in the boroughs of
Queens and Brooklyn late last year.  We have received constant complaints
from citizens and from the Borough Presidents and even from the Mayor himself
because of the lack of attention given to those areas. We have requested a
total of 94 additional climbers and pruners and gardeners to catch up on this
work at a total increase in cost of $161,634.

Recreation

        As stated above, during the period of the new budget the active
recreation area in the City's parks will have been increased by 35% over what
was developed in 1938.  To handle this additional load, we have requested 82
additional playground directors and 4 additional supervisors of recreation at
a tctal increase in money of $112,920.  This represents an increase of 28% in
the funds fcr recreation personnel.

Zoos

        The department now has 20 keepers of menagerie in the two zoos.  We
have requested 14 additional. Under the present setup, because of inadequate
forces, 28 laborers, attendants and other personnel are required to work out
of title in the zoo areas. Only recently, a laborer doing keepers' work was
gored by a goat; and unless those men are replaced by personnel qualified for
the work, we can expect additional, more serious accidents. Furthermore,
because of lack of adequate qualified personnel in the zoos, we lost 34
animals and birds valued at $1,300. which were fed by the public everything
from stones to rubber balls and died just as certainly as if they had been
poisoned.  The total increase in funds requested for zoo personnel is
$20,160.

General Maintenance Personnel - (Assistant Gardeners, Attendants,
                                    Watchmen, Laborers)

        The bulk of the department's maintenance work - picking up, cleaning,
mowing lawns, direction of the general public, etc. - is done by laborers,
assistant gardeners, attendants and watchmen, of which the department's
forces now total 2,855. We have requested an additional 37 watchmen, 78
attendants and 285 assistant gardeners, a total of 400 additional individual
employees. This represents an increase in the working forces of 14% to take
care of the 35% increase in facilities. The difference will be compensated
for in part by re-assignment to proper duties of employees in those title now
working out of title as auto enginemen, keepers of the menagerie and
mechanics of various kinds; in part by increased efficiency resulting from an
adequate, properly graded supervisory force made up of the new foremen
requested, and by promotions within the present force; and in part by
additional mechanical equipment requested, which will permit individual
employees to perform greater amounts of work.  The increase in funds for
these 400 employees amounts to $584,919.

        In this connection, I have renewed the request made a year and a half
ago that the labor classes in the department be changed from per diem to per
annum in accordance with the revised Sharkey Bill now pending in the City
Council. The only additional funds required in the period of this budget for
this purpose will be $162,170.50 which represents no increase in number of
employees, but is simply to extend the working year of 450 laborers and
assistant gardeners to a per annum status based on 286 working days at their
present per diem rate.

Summer Work

        In 1938 the department received by transfer from the Borough
Presidents of Queens, Brooklyn and Richmond a total of 9 miles of bathing
beaches for the operation of which inadequate funds were provided. During the
past summer it was necessary to make temporary transfers from the general
park maintenance forces to the beaches of 118 men in the laboring class. Even
with these transfers of men badly needed in the areas for which they were
provided, the beaches wore not satisfactorily operated.  During the coming
summer, the new Rockaway Beach development will be placed in operation with
increased facilities and consequently greater attraction to the public.  This
beach during the past summer was under construction and was maintained by the
contractor.  The depletion of regular maintenance forces in neighborhood
parks resulted in serious deterioration in those areas; we cannot expect to
keep them up to a reasonable standard if this practice of robbing them to
operate the beaches is continued. For the proper operation of the beaches,
the new budget should provide 163 additional attendants, 5 additional chief
lifeguards and 3 additional auto enginemen on part time at a total increase
in funds of $86,953.

Salary Increases

        Since the beginning of the present administration, there have been
practically no salary increases in the Department with the exception of
mandatory increases. During this time the total Department payroll has almost
doubled and the Department's forces have increased correspondingly, and the
amount of work done by the Department has trebled.

        The administrative and supervisory forces are required to work long
hours overtime and their responsibilities are in most cases far beyond what
would normally be expected for the salaries they are receiving.  The increase
of $35,353. requested for salary increases is an insignificant part of the
total department budget, but it means a great deal to the individuals
responsible for carrying out the strenuous duties required of them.

          MAINTENANCE AND AND OPERATION OTHER THAN PERSONAL SERVICE

Motor Vehicles and Equipment

        The Department's 439 units of motor vehicle equipment represent an
original investment of approximately $543,000.  We are requesting $95,000 for
replacements.  At this rate the Department's equipment will be renewed about
every five years.  The average piece of equipment in the Department is driven
about 65,000 miles in five years.  I understand that the United States
Treasury Department finds it most economical to trade in government cars
after 40,000 miles of running or when the estimated cost of repairs on an
individual piece of equipnent exceeds one-third of its market value.  In many
cases our equipment has been driven beyond the stage of economical repair and
this request, based on replacement every five years, is well on the
conservative side.

           The request also includes $156,000 for new equipment of which
$50,000, is intended for use on the Belt Parkway which will be turned
over to the Department for operation and maintenance on July 1, 1940.  It
is imperative that equipment needed on this parkway be purchased before
that date so that it may be available for immediate use.  The funds should
be set up in this budget and the equipment should be requisitioned April
1, 1940.

           Eighteen new half-ton and one-ton pick-up trucks arc requested for
District Foremen.  Of the 35 districts into which the City is divided for
park operation, the district foremen in only one-half are provided with
transportation.  Some of the others provide their own cars for which they
receive no added compensation and others have no transportation whatsoevor.
This lack of transportation is one of the reasons for the present low stage
in the efficiency of the supervisory force.

        Additional trucks of various sizes are needed to handle the increased
maintenance load brought on by a 35% increase in developed operating
facilities.  In addition, there are numerous incidental items of equipment
such as catch basin cleaners, compressors, tree movers, etc, which the
Department does not now possess and which are necessary for proper
maintenance, particularly on the parkways.

        We also require four sprinkler trucks for use on bridle paths, and in
the winter, for snow plowing work.  In the past we have used eight antiquated
Department of Sanitation sprinklers which were condemned years ago and which
we have been operating without licenses because the State Department of Motor
Vehicles refused to register then on account of their dangerous condition.
We have been forced to use this equipment in the absence of any other means
of keeping down the dust on the bridle paths, and even with this equipment,
the complaints from citizens of dust rising from bridle paths are as regular
as the sunrise during the summer.  Sprinklers are also required on new
parkway developments to irrigate newly planted trees and shrubs; loss fron
lack of this kind of attention in the past has run into thousands of dollars.
It is anticipated that the four new sprinklers requested will do more than
the amount of work possible with our present eight relics of a bygone era
which are no longer in running condition.

           The total increase in funds under this item is $205,600.

Motor Vehicle Supplies

           Under this item an increase of $27,375 to provide additional gas,
oil and other motor vehicle supplies is needed to run the new motor vehicle
equipment and additional lawn mower and other gasoline driven equipment, for
which funds are requested.

Botanical and Agricultural Supplies

           The request of $94,500 represents an increase of $35,500 to take
care of the additional 4,000 acres of general park development and the
planting of 302 acres of additional active recreational areas.  It will be
noted that the proportional increase in these funds is 54% as compared with a
35% increase in additional developed areas.  The newly developed areas will
require a proportionally greater use of fertilizers and spray materials to
get them promptly established and to prevent undue loss of lawns, shrubs and
trees. In addition, the funds for this type of work have always been
insufficient to maintain planted areas, and lawns in particular, at a
satisfactory standard.  We lose hundreds of acres of lawns each year through
lack of fertilizers and other materials needed for their proper culture.

Recreation Equipment

        An increase of $17,100 is requested for recreation equipment to take
care of the new 302 acres of active recreation areas and to make replacements
of equipment already worn out or deteriorated beyond the possibility of
economical repair. 

General Plant Equipment

        The $262,000 requested for general plant equipment represents an
increase of $195,755. Of this increase $5,000 is for equipment in the central
repair shop, $18,000 for replacement of lawn mowing equipment, $88,000 for
now lawn mowing equipment, $23,000 for snow plowing equipment, $16,500 for
mechanical sweepers, $8,000 for portable mechanical equipment and $2,000 for
garage equipment.  The balance of the increase is for additional general
maintenance equipment such as brooms, shovels, paint brushes, rakes and other
incidentals.

        It must be borne in mind that in addition to the 35% increase in
developed areas, lawn mowing equipment must be provided for the 32-mile long
Belt Parkway, the 2-mile Whitestone Parkway, and the 1-mile Bronx Whitestone
Bridge Approach, for which no budgetary provision has over been made.  The
equipment for the Belt Parkway although not needed during the period to be
covered by this budget must be requisitioned by April 1,1940, to be available
when these parkways are turned over for maintenance on July 1, 1940.

         The purchase of mechanical sweepers will permit one man in one
day to clean parkway gutters which now require about 40 man days of labor.

         Portable mechanical equipment will enable the mechanical forces to
keep abreast of breakage of bench slats and other minor structures; work on
which they are at present months behind.

Highway Materials

         This includes materials for patching and repaving walks and paths.
The request for $20,000 represents an increase of $13,000 over the amount in
the 1938 budget.  The condition of park drives during the past few years has
been subject to tremendous public criticism.  This condition has been largely
due to lackk of patching materials in addition to lack of funds for complete
repaving in sections where the pavements have been worn beyond the
possibility of economical repair.  There are miles of park paths badly in
need of patching and resurfacing.  Accidents to pedestrians because of broken
and irregular surfaces are frequent and unless this condition is remedied,
the City can expect numerous suits for damages.

General Plant Materials

         Under this item an increase of $130,100 is requested bringing the
total requested to $278,000, During the past year we have found that certain
items in many of the structures built under the Work Relief Program are
rapidly deteriorating, for instance, there are hundreds of wood doors falling
to pieces because they were fabricated with uncured lumber.  These doors will
have to be replaced at a great expense for lumber and mechanic time.  Under
the general inspection last Fall, repairs rated 55.4% and painting 47.2%.
This low percentage is partially attributable tn lack of materials for
replacements; in thousands of cases, damaged structures have to be
temporarily patched without the use of new materials.  This temporary work is
in no sense satisfactory although it dees permit public use to coninue.
During the coming year those jobs will have to be done over with the
additional mechanics requested and with new materials to be purchased with
the funds requested under this item.

Repairs and Replacements

          The total request under this item is $42,000, an increase of
$22,900. ever the anaunt allowed in the 1938 budget.  This increase is made
up of $17,000. for repairs to the bridges over the transverse roads in
Central Park, work for which no qualified personnel are available in the
department.  There is also an item of $5,000. for replacement of the doors in
the Central Park Zoo.  The present doors are of wood and periodically go out
of commission and have to be repaired.  They should be replaced with metal
doors with new and stronger mechanical checks.  If this is not done, the
various animal houses will continue to be closed frequently while temporary
repairs arc made.

Contingencies

         Under this item the allowance of $3,990, has been increased by
$12,610. of which the majorr item is $10,600. for uniforms for beach
personnel.  This personnel totals 304 attendants at $4.00 a day.  It has been
the practice in the past to furnish uniforms to the attendants on the revenue
producing beaches and to employ laborers on the non-revenue producing beaches
at $5.50 per day.  The uniforms to be furnished to the beach attendants are
estimated to cost twenty-one cents per day which represents a saving due to
the difference in pay between the attendants and laborers of $1.29 a day per
man, or a total saving for the season of some $30,000.

Transferred Facilities

          When the swimming pools, public baths, beaches, triangles, malls,
otc. were transferred to the Park Department, budget funds totaling
$638,646.30 were transferred to take care of them.      These transfers were
made after the year was well advanced; and to extend the transferred funds
to cover a complete year of operations, they must be increased by $112,000.

                        REVENUE PRODUCING FACILITIES

          For the operation of the revenue producing facilities, conprised of
2 beaches, 16 swimming pools, 10 golf courses, 503 tennis courts and stadia,
an increase of $137,564,25 for personal service and $153,809 for other than
personal service is necessary.  These increases are due partly to new
facilities such as swimming pools, located at Carmine Street, 23 Street, and
60 Street; games areas and beach chair and umbrella rental stations which are
being constructed at Rockaway Beach; 131 new tennis courts which are being
constructed throughout the city.

           This request includes $56,202,63 for the City Building and Marine
Amphitheatre in Flushing Meadow Park, which should be provided on a
contingent basis in case the Fair runs only one year as now scheduled.

           This increase is also intended to do away with the necessity of
drafting borough forces to assist in the maintenance and operation of the
facilities.  During the soason of 1938 a total of $171,000 in budgetary
personal service had to be diverted fom parks in the various boroughs to
supplement the inadequate personnel available in the revenue producing budget
for the operation of revenue producing facilities.  All of these facilities
without this supplementary help would have been grossly undermanned and would
have suffered extreme deterioration from lack of maintenance and from lack of
control of the public.  This robbing of personnel from the regular parks
resulted in unsatisfactory maintenance in these areas; and unless adequate
personnel is provided for the revenue producing facilities, we can expect
continued unsatisfactory maintenance and increasingly heavy repair and
replacement costs in the parks which are undermanned on this account.

           The golf courses as staffed during 1938 were undermanned and the
equipment, purchased in 1934 through relief funds, is giving out.  Supplies
and materials were not sufficient to meet the demands due to the large amount
of play.  The grass on the courses has exhausted the fertility of the soil
used in their reconstruction.  We lost hundreds of acres of fairway grass
last season and a total of 18 greens because of inadequate personnel and
materials to keep them in healthy condition under the excessive play to which
they were subjected.  The play on the golf courses increased from 445,000
rounds in 1936 to 604,221 rounds in 1938.  In 1934 and 1935 sufficient
materials, supplies and equipment were purchased through relief funds to
operate the courses satisfactorily and to tako care of the necessary top
dressing, reseeding and fertilizing; but this source of materials is no
longer available and the City must provide adequate funds if the courses are
to continue to serve the public.  Without adequate maintenance the courses
will revert back to the condition they wore in before this administration.
To staff these courses so that they may be satisfactorily maintained and
operated, personal services for each course should amount to $28,000.  To
replace worn out equipment and to purchase the necessary supplies and
materials, it will be necessary to increase the budget for other than
personal service from the $22,000 which was expended in 1938 to $99,000 for
1939.  With the new golf fees which are to be put into effect this year, it
is estimated that an additional $70,000 in revenue will be taken in.

           Heretofore no provision has been made in the budget for
maintenance personnel on the beaches during the winter months nor for
personal service and other than personal service necessary to put the beaches
in shape for operation each Spring.  This work in the past has been done
jointly with relief funds and by diverting personnel and materials from the
regular parks fcr which they were provided in the budget.  Relief funds are
no longer available for this work, and as has been previously stated, we
cannot continue to divert personnel and materials from regular parks without
resulting in their loss through deterioration and lack of maintenance.

          During sunrner months and heaviest usage, it has been necessary to
divert hundreds of laborers from the regular parks to handle the large crowds
and to gather the tremendous amount of rubbish loft on the beaches.  Of the
$171,000 regular personnel diverted to Revenue Producing Facilities, it is
estimated that $91,755 went to the two Revenue Producing Beaches at Jacob
Riis Park and Orchard Beach.  With the World's Fair in session this summer,
it is only reasonable to assume that the crowds, at least at these two
beaches, will be considerably heavier than in the past, which makes it even
more imperative that adequate funds be provided for their maintenance and
operation.

          The total income from Revenue Producing Facilities in the year 1938
was $853,089,47.  With the new golf rates and with normal increase in use of
golf courses, we estimate golf revenue will incroase $70,000 next year.  The
normal increase in use of the established swimming pools is estimated at
$10,000.  The summer of 1939 will see three now outdoor pools in the Revenue
Producing group in Manhattan, from which we estimate the revenue will be
$15,000. The new Betsy Head Park bathing house will be completed permitting a
return to the standard rates for the use of the swimming pool with an
estimated increase of revenue of $15,000.  The normal increase in tennis
permits is estimated at $5,000, and we estimate that the two Revenue
Producing beaches will bring in $30,000, above last yoar.  There will be
other incidental revenues from the games areas being constructed at Rockaway
and from additional facilities at Coney Island.

          All told, the Revenue Producing Facilities shoull bring in
approximately $161,000. additional revenue during the 1939-1940 season.

                          ENGINEERING - PERSONAL SERVICE

               The twenty-nine new positions with a total payroll of $81,300
requested are not new positions in the department.  This personnel represents
the key positions in the Engineering Division and are now being paid by funds
charged against Capital Outlay, Street Improvements, etc. A great deal of
study must be continuously given to future development of parks and parkways
to insure proper coordination with completed developments. This work cannot
properly be charged against funds appropriated for present construction and
is rightly a budgetary charge.  This group is made up of both office and
field forces and is in responsible charge of all design and construction in
the department.
                        . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


               The major items of increase briefly described above aggregate
$2,750,924.35 of the total increase of $3,023,804.65. The balance of
$272,880.30 covers a large number of comparatively small items necessitated
by the increased amount of work required by expanded facilities. A few other
items such as a Greenskeeper, Radio Operator, and a Foreman of Track and
Athletic Field Maintenance are required to bring the Department's
organization up to date and to secure maximum efficiency from the present
forces, without even considering the increased personnel required.

               We have had endless complaints of the condition of golf course
greens during the past year.  This can be cured by employing a greenskeeper
for periodic inspection and for instructing the maintenance forces on the ten
courses.

               The Department has $80,000 worth of radio and public address
equipment which must be maintained, operated, and periodically modernized if
it is to be kept in working order.  Much of this equipment will 
be out of service if not deteriorated beyond repair this Spring because
prevision was not made in the 1938 budget for its proper maintenance.

               We have 13 cinder running tracks throughout the City of which
the then 11 completed last year were used by 658,024 athletes.  The only
track now in passable condition is that at Randall's Island, and this was
accomplished only by bootlegging assistance from a W.P.A. employee charged
against another job.  The other tracks are in disgraceful condition and there
is no employee in the Department qualified to supervise their renovation and
proper maintenance.

          I am just as interested as any other citizen in keeping the City's
running expenses as low as possible.  This request for a budget increase of
31% is entirely reasonable when due consideration is given to the 35%
increase in usable park facilities, and when further consideration is given
to the fact that the present budget, even with greatly increased efficiency
in organization and methods, has resultod in parks that are only 65% of a
standard to which the public is entitled.  Paring maintenance provisions to
such an extent that improvements cannot be kept in repair is the poorest kind
of economy.  There would be no excuse for letting history repeat itself by
permitting the City's parks to become ranshackled eyesores when so much
expense has been incurred in bringing them to their present greatly improved
condition.

                                  # # # # #

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                        HIKING TRAILS IN CITY PARKS

          There are no designated hiking trails in City Parks, however,
there are many excellent walks to attract the hiker. These walks and paths
are located as follows:

[WIDE TABLE OMITTED, SEE PDF]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 26, 1939


              Negotiations have been completed with John D. Rockefeller,
Jr. for the transfer to the Park Department of a one and three quarter acre
tract of land fronting on the east side of Fort Washington Avenue
immediately adjacent to the southerly boundary of Fort Tryon Park, This gift
of land rounds out the recreational areas donated by Mr, Rockefeller who, in
addition to acquiring and developing Fort Tryon Park and erecting therein
the Cloisters as a branch of the Metropolitan Museum and turning over the
entire area to the City, has leased to the Park Department, at a nominal
consideration, the large plot, also adjacent to the southerly boundary of
the park, lying between Fort Washington Avenue and Cabrini Boulevard.  This
area has been developed as a playground and opened to the public in October,
1936.  The new area across the street, which is rugged in character, will be
developed into a terraced playground for adults with esplanades and
overlooks from which park visitors may enjoy excellent views of Fort George
and the northerly end of Manhattan Island.  It will be necessary to
construct high retaining walls faced with fieldstone to match the masonry in
Fort Tryon Park. Work will be started by the Works Progress Administration
early next year and the park should bo opened to the public in the fall.
The assessed valuation of this land is $145,000; its dedication to the City
brings the total Rockefeller donations, in land and improvements, to
$11,500,000.

             This new playground marks another step in the park development
of the Fort Washington Heights - Inwood section of northern Manhattan,
which makes it one of the few neighborhoods in the City which is properly
planned and developed from a scenic and recreational standpoint.  The
percentage of recreational land to the whole area from river to river north
of 180 Street is 30 percent as against 18 percent of all Manhattan parks to
the entire borough area.  While the proportion is high, it must be borne in
mind that those parks are readily available to all residents of Manhattan
by rapid transit. Construction is procoeding rapidly on the formerly
undeveloped park areas in this section and, when completed, the northern
tip of Manhattan will boast the following diversified, recreational
facilities:


1 - Inwood Hill Park, 167 acres.

The fine native woodland will be made thoroughly accessible by means of a
network of footpaths with many benches for strollers.  The Henry Hudson
Parkway Authority contributed largely to this development, not only by
extensively landscaping the margins of the parkway approaches to the
double-decked bridge over Spuyten Duyvil, but also by making a sponsors'
contribution to the WPA to aid them in turning the former riverside dump,
north of Dyckman Street and west of the New York Contral Railroad tracks,
into an intensively developed area for active recreation.  The Authority
also provided a foot-bridge over the railroad and parkway underpasses so
that visitors in the upper portion of Inwood Hill can expeditiously reach
this waterfront area.  The Authority provided a further sponsors'
contribution to the WPA for toilet facilities, benches, drinking fountains
and overlooks along the high point of the park overlooking the river.  The
National Youth Administration has done creditable work in the development of
the park with walks, trails, drainage and general rehabilitation, and the
area is being used by thousands of New York City school children for nature
study under the guidance of their teachers.  The WPA is at present
constructing a boat basin in the Harlem Ship Canal which utilizes the old
channel bordering Inwood Hill and Isham Parks and no longer used since the
cutoff through the old Johnson Iron Works was completed by Army engineers
early this year.  This basin will house small boats of every description
from canoes and outboards to cabin cruisers.  It is scheduled to be
completed in April 1939 and before that time work will have been started on
the reconstruction of 10 acres of existing sandlots immediately adjacent to
the south of the basin into play fields and those too will be completed in
the summer of 1939, providing baseball diamonds and football fields with
adequate provisions for spectators.

2 - Isham Park.

This 20-acre area east of Inwood will be developed for passive recreation
and with rest areas for mothers and children in the neighborhood.  It has
been thoroughly rehabilitated during the last five years and the new work
will modernize the area while keeping the same facilities which it now
enjoys.

3 - Dyckman House, This historic structure located at 204th Street

and Broadway offers residents of the Inwood section a glimpse into the
colonial past of the City.


4 - Fort Tryon Park.

As indicated above this 59-acre area, the former estate of
C. K. G. Billings, was acquired by Mr. Rockefeller and developed into a
formal City park with extensive plantations and gardens.  The City
contributed the development of a playground in the northeast corner of the
park, at the intersection of Dyckman Street and Broadway, and the
installation of utilities and pavements, by an appropriation of $150,000.
The Cloisters Branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, located on a high
knoll at the northern end of the park, houses a superb collection of
medieval Gothic art and this five million dollar structure was also donated
by Mr. Rockefeller and opened to the public in May, 1938. From the broad
terraces of the Cloisters visitors have an excellent view across the Hudson
to the Palisades whose skyline preservation is assured through
Mr. Rockefeller's acquisition and dedication to the Palisades Interstate
Park Commission of 700 acres of the plateau in 1935. The two playground
areas at the south end of the park mentioned heretofore will provide
recreational facilities for the Fort Washington neighborhood, with the
existing area relieving the pressure of active youngsters on Fort Tryon
Park.  Through the generosity of Dr.  Joseph Paterno the fine wrought iron
fence which fronted his Castle on Cabrini Boulevard, and which was removed
to make way for the apartment house development now under construction
there, will be re-erected along the Fort Washington Avenue frontage of these
two playgrounds, forming an impressive approach to Fort Tryon Park.

5 - Bennett Park.

This two-acre site of a revolutionary redoubt, thoroughly rehabilitated
within the last four years, will be developed as a sitting park for the
residents of the many apartment houses in the vicinity and will include a
small marginal playground for youngsters of kindergarten age.

6 - Gorman Memorial Park, 2 acres.

This steep hillside area running up from Broadway to Wadsworth Terrace was
developed with the aid of funds left in the will of Gertrude Emily Gorman
Webb.  It was opened in January, 1937, and residents of the Fort George
section enjoy its paved overlook from which an excellent view across the
valley to Fort Tryon Park can be obtained.


7 - In Fort Washington Park...

...directly under the George Washington Bridge and adjacent to the
revolutionary earthworks, funds of the West Side Improvement are being used
to develop an extensive shorefront picnic area with adequate paths, benches,
fireplaces and tables. Directly adjacent to this rugged point and running
south to 160th Street, the area between the New York Central Railroad and
the river is being developed with facilities for active recreation with the
same funds. There will be a children's playground, court games, two baseball
diamonds and fifteen tennis courts.  A toilet building is incorporated in
the bridge structure by which this area is reached from the portion of the
park east of the railroad.

                                 # # # # #

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#922: Jun 30 - Jul 1-Opening of Marconi Memorial Field, Queens;

#923: Jul 3-Announcement of Independence Day celebrations in playgrounds;

#924: Jul 6-Bids opened for construction of superstructure of Belt Parkway
             Bridge over Mill Basin, Brooklyn;

#925: Jul 6-Bids opened for construction of fender racks at Cross Bay
            Viaduct, Queens;

#926: Jul l4-Inauguration of a series of band concerts, sponsored by City,
             Briedsam Foundation, & Local 802 of AF of M;

#927: Jul 14-Announcement of celebrations at various playgrounds during
             July, commenorating their official opening;

#928: Jul 14-Announcement of reduction in parking fee at World's Fair;

#929: Jul 14-Finals of Horseshoe Pitching Tournament announced;

#930: Jul 17-Announcement of ship bulletin board dedication in Battery Park;

#931: Jul 18-City asks cemetaries to replant trees, particularly in areas
             bordering streets;

#932: Jul 19-Dedication of Ship Bulletin Board;

#933: Jul 25-0pening of construction bids for bridge over Paerdegas Bay
              adjoining Jamaica Bay;

#934: Jul 26-0pening of East River park from Brand Street to East 12th;

#935: Jul 27-Announcement of free public outdoor dancing, Riverside Park;

#936: Jul 27-Announcement of Chess & Checker Tournament finals-Hecksher
             Playground;

#937: Aug 2-0pening of bids for construction of two bridges: Flatbush Ave
            & Ocean Parkway;

#938: Aug 3-Swimming ppol at 342 E. 54th open twice a week to groups from
            Build for Jewish Blind;

#939: Aug 3-Announcement of finals of checker tournament, 16 yr. age group;

#940: Aug 4-Opening of construction bids for 2 grade separations at Fort
             Hamilton Pkway & 69th St (Shore Pkway section of Belt Pkway);

#941: Aug 4-Announcement of celebrations commemorating opening of various
            parks in the five Boroughs;

#942: Aug 4-Announcement of completion of Lincoln Terrace Park Playground,
            Brooklyn, Braddock Ave & 240 St, Queens Billage, & bicycle
            path on Ocean Pkway;

#943: Aug 7-Announcement of 2nd amateur rphotographic contest, Sept 20th;

#944: Aug 7-Announcement of finals of annual Am. Ballad contest;

#945: Aug 9-Announcement of opening of playground bounded by Atlantic Ave-
            95th Ave, 88th & 89th Streets, Queens;
             
#946: Aug 9-Announcement of finals of water polo tournament, Aug 10th;

#947: Aug ll-Announcement of official opening of new police station bldg,
              135th St & 12th Ave;

#948: Aug 11-Construction bids opened for h bridges on Shore Pkway &
             Southern Pkway section of Belt Pkway system;

#949: Aug 14-Construction of 23 new tennis courts, Randals, Island, near
              completion;

#950: Aug 14-Completion of renovation of Admiral Farragut monument announce
             
#951: Aug 16-Somervell, Works Project Administrator, makes public a summary
              of WPA accomplishments for 1939;

#952: Aug 18-Opening of bids for reconstruction of Culver Rapid Transit
              Railroad at Shell Rd., Brooklyn;

#953: Aug 22-Bids accepted for "planting contract" to complete park
             development of Federal Post Office Area;

#954: Aug 22-Announeement of beginning work on elimination of all crossings
             on the Rockaway Beach Division of the Long Island RR;

#955: Aug 22-23-Announement of 2nd annual Lifeguard Championship, Aug 23rd
                at 95th Street & Rockaway Beach;

#956: Aug 24-New lab building turned over to Dept of Water Supply, Gas &
             Electricity (Underhill Ave & Park Place);

#957: Aug 24-Announcement of 4th Annual Swimming & Diving Championship,
             Astor Park;

#958: Aug 25-Bids opened for 2 contracts to provide for landscaping Cross
             Island Pkway from Whitestone Bridge intersection to Fort Totten

#959: Aug 26-Announcement of 25 millionth car to cross Henry Hudson Bridge

#960: Aug 26-Announcement of opening of 2nd Ave playground bounded by
             Bradford, Edison, LaSalle, & Waterbury Aves, The Bronx;

#961: Aug 26-Announcementof new softball diamond at Jacob Riis Park;

#962: Aug 29-Announcement that 2 millionth car passed over Cross Bay Pkway

#963: Sept 7-Announcement of participation of approx 3000 playground
             children in recreational activities demonstration; 

#964: Sept 11-Announcement of plans to widen & improve Cross Bay Boulevard
               between Howard Beach & toll booths of Cross Bay Pkway Bridge;

#965: Sept 11-Announcement of closing of 15 outdoor swimming pools in various
              boroughs;

#966: Sept l4-Announcement of finals of Annual American Ballad competition;

#967: Sep l8-Announcement of bids for 2 contracts to provide landscaping
              Cross Island Pkway Section of Belt Pkway from Creedmoor State
              Hospital to Laurelton Parkway & Southern Pkway from Laurelton
              Pkway to Rockaway Boulevard;

#968: Sep 22-Announement of openihg of new athletic & recreation center in
             Van Courtland Park;

#969: Sept 22-Announcement of opening of bids on contracts for repairing
              portion of Mosholu Pkway & for Park Drive in Van Cortland Pk;

#970: Sep 22-Announcement of opening of new tennis courts at Randall's Island

#971: Sep 25-Bids received for contracts to construct five getties along
             beach front at Jacob Riis Park
             
#972: Sep 25-Announcement of opening of bids for construction of a
             eellular [sic] street bulkhead at Sound View Park in The Bronx;

#973: Sep 27-Announcement of new 3/4 acre children's playground in Bronx Pk

#974: Sep 27-Bids opened for construction of 3 bridges on Shore Pkway section
             of Belt Parkway;

#975: Sep 29-Announcement of the cancellation of @give away@ of 5,000 begonia
             plants;

#976: Sep 30-Announcement of finals of paddle tennis tournament-North Meadow
             Playground;

#977: Sep 30-Announcement of celebrations in various playgrounds to
             commemorate official opening to public; 

#978: Sep 30-Announcement of regulations governing tree planting;

#979: Oct 7-Announcement of opening of a new park bounded by DeGraw St,
            Nevins St, Douglass St., & 3rd Ave in Brooklyn;

#980: Oct 11-Opening of reconstructed & enlarged Pulaski Park announeed.

981 Oct. 18 Opening of bids for construction of 2 pedestrian bridges over Cross
            island Parkway

982 Oct. 19 Announcement of winner of Amateur Photo Contest

983 Oct. 21 Draft of letter from Moses to Community Club re baseball diamonds

984 Oct. 24 Opening of bids for landscaping Shore Parkway section of Belt
            Parkway

985 Oct. 24 Park announces changes in maintenance and operative staff
            effective November 1

986 Oct. 27 City-wide finals of Horseshoe Pitching Contest

987 Oct. 27 Kite flying areas announced

988 Oct. 31 Exhibit of native Brazilian birds from part of Worlds Fair

989 Oct. 31 Opening of 3 new playgrounds in Queens and Bronx

990 Nov. 2 Celebration opening of various playgrounds during month of November

991 Nov. 4 Announcement of Annual Fall Chrysanthemum Show in Brooklyn

992 Nov. 6 Opening of bids for relocation of of the lighting system at the
           intersection of Southern and Croaa Island Parkways in Queens

993 Nov. 10 Opening of bids for contracts to provide for landscaping the Shore
            Parkway section of Belt Parkway from Fort Hamilton to Coney Island

994 Nov. 11 List of various chrysanthemums in Conservatory Gardens and
            with descriptions

995 Nov. 15 Bids opened on 2 contracts in connection with construction of
            Belt Parkway

996 Nov. 16 Announcement of Annual Handicraft Exhibition

997 Nob. 25 Finals of 6-man football tounement

998 Nov. 27 Bids opened for construction of 2 pedestrian over-passes over
            Shore Parkway section of Belt Parkway

999 Nov. 30 Extensive program of winter sport activities

1000 Nov. 30 One million tulips gift of Netherlands government to be planted
             along Henry Hudson Parkway

1001 Dec. 1 Bids opened for landscaping Shore Parkway section of Belt Parkway

1002 Dec. 3 Special activities planned for 11 playgrounds.

1003 Dec. 3 Bids opened for placing final fill at Shore Parkway

1004 Dec. 4 Seasonal closing of 10 municipal golf courses on Dec. 5

1005 Dec. 4 1939 opening of 3 playgrounds in the Bronx announced

1006 Dec. 12 Parkway authority announced 29,001,000 used Henry Hudson
             Parkway Bridge since Dec. 12, 1936

1007 Dec. 19 Ceremonies in connection with 22 Christmas trees in parks

1008 Dec. 28 Bids opened on 2 contracts for landscaping the Cross Island
             section of Belt Parkway

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 28, 1939


            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks on two
contracts for landscaping the Cross Island section of the Belt Parkway from
Fort Totten to Grand Central Parkway.

            One contract provides for the furnishing and spreading of
topsoil where required within the limits mentioned above.  The planting of
trees, shrubs and vines and seeding will be performed under the other
contract.

            With the letting today, contracts have been let for 92% of the
landscape work required for the entire Belt Parkway, from Owl's Head Park in
Brooklyn to the Whitestone Parkway in Queens.

            The low bidders were:

            For Topsoiling


            1. Slattery Contracting Company
               72-02 51st Avenue, Winfield, L.I,              $62,060.00

            2. Tully & Dillapoli, Inc.
               30-11 12th Street, Long Island City             72,770.00

            3. Grant Park Construction Co.
               65 Prospect Avenue, Hewlett, L.I.               74,815.00

            For Planting


             1. Grant Park Construction Company
                65 Prospeot Avenue, Hewlett, L.I.               62,284.82

             2. John Gozo
                1625 West 6th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.            70,361.80

             3. Roman Landscape Contracting Co.
                551 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C.                      71,869,84


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 19, 1939

                   The Park Department announces that ceremonies in
connection with the twenty-two Christmas trees, which are being erected and
decorated in parks throughout the five boroughs, will take place on
Wednesday, December 20, at 5:00 P.M.  A special program will be held at the
principal trees in each borough, which will be at City Hall Park, Manhattan;
Borough Hall Parka Brooklyn, Joyce Kilmer Park, The Bronx; King Park, Queens
and Borough Hall, Richmond.

                   At City Hall Park, the ceremonies will start at 5:00
P.M. and will be broadcast over Station WNYC..  Mayor La Guardia will throw
the switch that will light the tree at 5:25 P.H., officially starting New
York City's observance of the Christmas season, Borough President Stanley
N. Isaacs will also participate in the exercises.  Selections will be played
by the Department of Parks' Band and Christmas Carols will be sung by the
Police Department's Glee Club and Boys' Choir of the Sacred Heart Church,
Borough Presidents Ingersoll, Lyons and Palma will light the trees in their
respective boroughs where exercises will be conducted under the direction of
the Borough Park Directors who have arranged appropriate programs.

                   A special decorative scheme has been designed for the
Park Department Headquarters at The Arsenal, Central Park, which will depict
the Three Wise proceeding to the Star in the East, centered in a holly
wreath ten feet in diameter.

                   The trees will be lit each evening from 4:30 P.M. to 2:00
A.M.  until January 2. Christmas trees will be erected at the following
locations:

Manhattan:     City Hall Park
               Conservatory Garden - 104 to 105 Streets and Fifth Avenue
               Thomas Jefferson Park - First avenue and 111 Street
               Roosevelt Park - Forsythe and Canal Streets
               Fort Tryon Park - Riverside Drive, Broadway and Dyckman Street
               Carl Schurz Park - 85 Street and East End Avenue
               Mt. Morris Park - Fifth Avenue and 124 Street

Bronx:         Henry Hudson Parkway - Spuyten Duyvil and Riverdale Avenue
               Joyce Kilmer Park - 161 Street and Grand Concourse
               St. Mary's Park - St. Ann*s Avenue and East 144 Street
               St. James Park - East 191 Street and Jerome Avenue

Brooklyn:      Borough Hall
               Grand Army Plaza, Prospect Park
               Leiv Eirikason Park - 67 Street between 4th and 5th Avenues
               McCarren Park « Driggs Avenue and Lorimer Street

Queens:        King Park - Jamaica Avenue and 151 Street
               Flushing Park - Northern Boulevard and Main Street
               Forest Park - Park Lane South and 108 Street
               Highland Park - Jamaica Avenue and Elton Street
               Jacob Riis Park - Rockaway, Traffic Circle
               Rockaway Beach - 95 Street Mall

Richmond:      Borough Hall, Bay Street and Borough Place

                 Christmas parties will be held in all Park Department
playgrounds during the period of December EO to December 30, and
arrangements have been made for Santa Claus to visit 65 recreation centers
throughout the City where elaborate programs have been prepared.  Santa
Claus's schedule of visitations is as follows:

Borough
 Playground                              Time of Visit

Manhattan

Mt. Morris East - 120 Street and Madison Ave.       Dec. 20  -  11:00   A.M.
Highbridge - Amsterdam Ave. and "Test 189 St.       Dec. 20  -   3:30   P.M.
82nd Street and Riverside Drive                     Dec. 21  -  10:30   A.M.
MoCray - 138 Street between 5th and Lenox Aves.     Dec. 21  -  11:00   A.M.
Carmensville - 152 Street and Amsterdam Ave.        Dec. 21  -   2:00   P.M.
74 Street and Riverside Drive                       Dec. 22  -  10:30   A.M.
J, Hood Wright - 174 Street and Ft. Washington
                                  Avenue            Dec. 22 - 10:30 A.M.
Horth Meadow - 97 Street bet. East and Yfest
                 Drive, Central Park                Dec. 22  -  10:30 A.M.
189 Street and Amsterdam Avenue                     Dec. 22  -  10:30 A.M.
Morningside - West 123 Street and lianhattan Ave    Dec. 22  -  10:30 A.M.
Sauer · 12th Street between Avenues A and B         Dec. 22  -  10:30 A.M.
East River Drive and 12th Street                    Dec. 22  -   2:00 P.M.
Payson Avenue and Dyckman Street                    Dec. 22  -   3;00 P.M.
West 45th Street bet, 9th and 10th Avenues          Dec. 22  -   3:00 P.M.
Roosevelt - Chrystie and Forsythe Streets           Dec. 22  -   3:00 P.M.
Harlem Health Roof - 158 East 115 Street            Dec. 22  -   3:30 P.M.
Lewis and Rivington Streets                         Dec. 23  -  11:00 A.M.
Gulick, Sheriff and Broome Streets                  Dec. 23  -   1:00 P.M.
83 Roosevelt Street - between Cherry & Oak Sts, Dec. 23  -   2:00 P.M.
Chelsea Roof - > 27 Street and 10th Avenue          Dec. 26  -   2:00 P.M.
Carl Schurz - East 84 Street and East River         Dec. 26  -   3:00 P.M.
Mt, Morris East - 120 Street and Madison Ave,       Dec. 27  -   3:00 P.M.
McCray - 138 Street between 5th and Lonox Ave.      Dec. 27  -   3:00 P.M.
St. Catherine's - 68 Street and 1st Avenue          Dec. 27  -   3:00 P.M.
Downing Street and Sixth Avenue                     Dec. 28  -   2:00 P.M.
Harlem Housing - 158 East 115 Street                Dec. 28  -   3:00 P.M.
Heckscher - 64 Street and Central Park              Dec. 28  -   3:00 P.M.
Carmine Street Gym - 7th and Carmine Streets        Dec. 29  -   3:00 P.M.
West 43rd Street off Ninth Avenue                   Dec. 29  -   3:00 P.M.
95 Thompson Street                                  Dec. 29  -   3:00 P.M.
130th Street and Fifth Avenue                       Dec. 29  -   3:00 P.M.

Queens

0'Connell - 114 Av, & 196 St., St. Albans       Dec. 20 - 10:30 A.M.
Broadway and 78 Street                              Dec. 23 - 11:00 A.M.
Laurelton Parkway and Merrick Boulevard             Dec. 21 - 10:30 A.M.
Jackson Pond - Myrtle Avenue and 108 Street         Dec. 22 -  2:00 P.M.
Highland Park - Bulwer Place and Highland Blvd.     Dec. 22 - 11:00 A.M.
Dry Harbor - Myrtle Avenue and Dry Harbor Road      Dec. 22 -  1:00 P.M.
Rainey Park - Vernon Blvd. opp, 34th Avenue         Dec. 22 - 10:30 A.M.
O'Connor - 33rd Avenue and 210th Street             Dec. 22 - 11:00 A.M.
Corona Avenue and 102nd Street                      Dec. 22 -  4:00 P.M.
ITewtown - 92nd Street and 56th Avenue              Dec. 22 - 11:00 A.M.
Jackson Heights ~ 30th Avenue and 84th Street       Dec. 22 - 12:00 Noon
Crocheron Avenue and 215th Street                   Dec. 22 - 11:30 A.M.
Chisholm - Poppenhausen Avenue and East River       Dec. 22 - 10:15 A.M.
Von Dohlen - 138 Street and Archer Avenue           Dec. 22 - 10:00 A.M.
Brookville Boulevard and 143rd Avenue               Dec. 23 - 10:00 A.M.

Bronx  

Reservoir Avenue bet. Sedgwick and "ebb Aves.   Dec. 21     -   11:00 A.M.
Aldus Street and vVhitlock Avenue               Dec. 21     -   11:00 A.M.
Olinville Avenue and Britton Street             Dec. 21     -   11:00 A.M.
Mosholu Parkway, N.E, of Jerome Avenue          Dec. 21     -   11:00 A.M.
141st Street and Brook Avenue                   Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
East 178 St. bet. Cedar and Sedgwiok Avenues    Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
East 188 Street and Hughes Avenue .             Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
East 208 Street and Bainbridge Avenue           Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
Jerome Avenue and East 191 Street               Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
West 188 Street and University Avenue           Dec. 22     -   11:00 A.M.
Jerome Avenue and rfest 165 Street              Dec. 22     -    2:00 P.M.

Brooklyn 

Borough Hall Park                               Dec. 20 - 5:00 P.M.
Leiv Eiriksson - Eighth Ave. and 65 Street      Deo. 20 - 5:00 P.M.
McGarren - Driggs Avenue and Lorimer Street     Dec. 20 - 5:00 P.M.

Richmond 

Tompkins Avenue and Shaughnessy Lane            Dec. 21       10:30   A.M.
Harbor Road near Richmond Terrace               Dec. 23        2:00   P.M.
Crescent and Beechwood Avenues                  Dec. 22        2:00   P.M.
Jewett and Castleton Avenues                    Dec. 21       10:00   A.M.
First Avenue near Broadway                      Dec. 21       10:30   A.M.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 12, 1939


                       The New York City Parkway Authority announced today
that, in its three years ofoperation, 29,001,400 cars have used the Henry
Hudson Bridge, spanning the Harlem Ship Canal, The bridge was opened to
traffic on December 12, 1936 and during the first year 6,243,902 cars used
the bridge, which had only one deck at this time.

                       The second twelve months of operation showed an
increase of 3,913,885 cars or better than 63^. Due to the increase in
traffic, an upper level was constructed, completed and opened on May 7, 1938.
During the third year 12,599,711 cars used the bridge, more than 1,000,000
cars per month.

                       The Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge was constructed and is
operated by the New York City Parkway Authority.  In addition to this
structure, the Marine Parkway Bridge, spanning Rockaway Inlet between the
foot of Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn and Jacob Riis Park in Queens which was
opened on July 3, 1937, has had a total traffic of 5,391,900 cars while the
Cross Bay Parkway Bridge, opened on June 3rd of this year, has had 2,827,700.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 4, 1939


         The Department of Parks announces the opening in The Bronx
of three new playgrounds and a sitting area today at 3 P.M.  The three
playgrounds are located as follows:

              Hine's Park - Fulton Avenue and East 167th Street

              Watson, Gleason and Rosedale Avenues

              East 177th Street and Noble Avenue

         The sitting area is located at 254th Street and Riverdale Avenue.

         A ceremony will be held at the large playground located at
Watson, Gleason and Rosedale Avenues in which Mayor LaGuardia, Borough
President James J. Lyons, Major Edmond H. Leavey, Acting Work Projects
Administrator of New York City, and Mr. Roderick Stephens, President of the
Bronx Beard of Trade, will participate. Park Commissioner Moses will preside.

         The 3.3 acre Rosedale Avenue playground contains a separate
children's area with a wading pool and basketball court, slides, see-saws,
swings, sandpit, jungle gym and playhouses. The balance of the area provides
eight shuffleboard courts, three softball diamonds, eight handball courts and
a large asphalt roller-skating area. After the exercises the official party
will make a tour of the other three areas.

         At East 177th Street and Noble Avenue the 3.6 acre area contains a
children's playground and a separate regulation baseball diamond with
concrete bleachers accommodating 150 spectators. The children's area is
divided into two parts separated by a high, natural rock outcrop. One part
contains a children's playground with combination wading pool and volley ball
court, kindergarten apparatus, a large shaded sandpit, slides, swings, jungle
gym and a brick comfort station. The other part is paved and will be used as
a combination roller skating and games area.

         These two playgrounds were acquired in connection with the
southerly extension of the Bronx River Parkway and will provide recreation
for those living along the route of this proposed parkway.

         Hine's Park at Fulton Avenue and East 167 Street is a
triangular-shaped area containing a small children's playground, providing a
sandpit, see-saws, slides, kindergarten swings and a jungle gym.

         The 254th Street and Riverdale Avenue area adjacent to the Henry
Hudson Parkway is a sitting park.  It is landscaped with shade trees and has
ample benches along its winding paths. The land for this park area is an
excess parcel condemned in connection with the Henry Eudson Parkway.

         The opening of these four areas designed by the Park Department and
built by the Work Projects Administration makes a total of 306 new or
reconstructed playgrounds completed by the Park Department since 1934.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 4, 1939


         The Department of Parks announces the seasonal closing of the ten
municipal golf courses and the pitch and putt golf course at Jacob Riis Park
with the end of play on Sunday, December 3rd.  To keep them open beyond this
date, with the alternate freezing and thawing, would be injurious to the
courses and cause bare spots to show up in the greens which could not be
rehabilitated for the opening of the courses next spring.

         The small demand at this time is another factor which determined the
closing date, of the courses, as they, as well as other Revenue Producing
Facilities under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, are run on a
self sustaining basis which requires the income to be sufficient to pay the
cost of maintenance and operation.

         During this season there have been 603,259 rounds of golf played
over the various courses, as compared with 604,218 during the season of 1938.
The following is the number of rounds recorded at each of the

ten courses throughout the season:

       Bronx: Van Cortlandt Golf Course         57,719
              Mosholu Golf Course               68,673
              Pelham Bay Golf Course            61,438
              Split Rock Golf Course            38,953
      Queens: Clearview Golf Course             51,038
              Kissena Golf Course               69,992
              Forest Park Golf Course           69,145
    Brooklyn: Dyker Beach Golf Course           94,491
    Richmond: Silver Lake Golf Course           47,799
              LaTourette Golf Course            44,011

         With the intensive play over the courses it has been difficult to
keep them in playing condition, but the change in rates and the resulting
increase in income has permitted a larger amount of money to be spent on the
up-keep of the courses, with the result that their condition has improved
over former years.

         During the season of 1938 $235,473.75 was received from the sale of
permits, lockers and golf reservations, $280,712.75 was received in 1939, an
increase of $45,239.00. Expenditures in 1938 were $339,892.93, as compared
with $264,028.00 in 1939.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 4, 1939


                 Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal Building, Central Park, for placing of final fill at Shore Parkway
between Owl's Head Park and Fort Hamilton:

                 The work under this contract will consist of filling to
grade the park area between Shore Drive and the new Belt Parkway.  This work
will complete the filling operations in Shore Parkway and 23.4 acres of new
park created since the relocation of the old rock bulkhead.

                 The low bidders were:

                 1. Slattery Contracting Company
                    72-02 51st Avenue
                    Winfield, L.I.                         $116,050.00

                 2. Tully & DiNapoli, Inc.
                    30-11 12th Street
                    Long Island City, N.Y.                  121,020.00

                 3. Welsh Brothers Contracting Company
                    35 Purvis Street
                    Long Island City, N.Y.                  134,580.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 3, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that special recreational
activities are scheduled for eleven Park Department playgrounds during the
month of December in commemoration of their official opening to the public.

           These anniversary celebrations will include kindergarten
demonsrations, puppet shows, singing of patriotic songs, group games,
recitations, gymnastic exhibitions and athletic meets.

           The December schedule for playground birthday celebrations is as 
follows:

Borough      Playground                                       Opened

Manhattan    Highbridge Playground - West 189 Street and
                                        Amsterdam Avenue      December 5, 1936

             Highbridge Playground - West 167 Street and
                                        Amsterdam Avenue      December 5, 1936

             Riverside Drive and 82 Street                    December 4, 1937

Brooklyn     Prospect and Greenwood Avenues                   December 19, 1935

             McLaughlin Playground - Bridge and Tillary Sts.  December 11, 1936

             Hopkinson Avenue and Dean Street                 December 19, 1936

             Broadway & Kent Avenue                           December 31, 1937

             Prospect Place & Underhill Avenue                December 5, 1938

Bronx        Cedar and Sedgwick Avenues                       December 19, 1935

Queens       Broadway and 78 Street, Jackson Heights          December 24, 1936

             Equity Playground - 90 Street and 88 Avenue
                                    Woodhaven                 December 26, 1937

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 1, 1939


           Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal
Building, Central Park, providing for landscaping the Shore Parkway section of
the new Belt Parkway from Cross Bay Boulevard to 158th Street, Borough of
Queens. 

           One contract is for furnishing and placing topsoil and humus and
the Dther for planting trees, shrubs and vines, both projects being within
the limits mentioned.

           Including today's lettings provision will have been made for
landscaping 26 miles of a total of approximately 30 miles of the Belt
Parkway.  Remaining landscape contracts will be advertised for bids in the
very near future.

           The low bidders were:

For Topsoiling Shore Parkway from Cross Bay Boulevard to 158th Street, Queens


           1.    Tully & DiHapoli, Inc.
                 30-11 12th Street, L.I.C.                 $ 94,642.00

           2.    Slattery Contracting Company
                 72O2-51st Avenue, Winfield, L.I.            97,859,00

           3.    Tufano Contracting Corp.
                 168-22 91st Avenue, Jamaica, L.I.           99,986.50


For Planting Shore Parkway from Cross Bay Boulevard to 158th Street, Queens


           1.    Madden & Lane, Inc.
                 42-16 Vernon Boulevard, L.I.C.              55,651.60

           2.    Roman Landscape Contracting Co. Inc.
                 551 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C.                    64,196.61

           3.    Grant Park Construction Company
                 Hewlett, L.I.                               64,505.15


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 30, 1939


              Over one million tulips, a gift from the Government of the
Netherlands to the City of New York, will be planted during the next two
weeks along the Henry Hudson Parkway.  The acceptance of the gift by the Park
Department was announced yesterday, but the plans for the planting have been
under consideration for some time.

              The last shipment of bulbs making up the gift of a million
tulips reached the docks at Rotterdam, Holland on November 21st, just in time
to catch the "Rotterdam" which was the last boat to leave Dutch shores before
the marine mine disasters put a stop to Dutch sailings. The time element was
important anyway, as the bulbs must be planted here before freezing weather.

              Several million people saw the display of a million tulips at
the World's Fair last May, and there was a wave of protest when the
announcement was made that these tulips would have to be destroyed. The Dutch
Bulb Growers, however, renewed the offer of a similar display for next year's
World's Fair, but when it was announced that the Fair would not open until
May 25th, too late for the blossoming of tulips, the offer was withdrawn.
The Bulb Growers suggested to the Park Commissioner that the Henry Hudson
Parkway and Riverside Drive would make an ideal setting for a display of a
million tulips. The Park Department accepted the plan.

              After the plan was accepted by the Dutch Bulb Growers and the
Netherlands Government, there remained the problem of packing and shipping a
million bulbs in the quickest possible time, with working staffs depleted by
mobilization.  Finally, cabled advices were received that three ships were on
their way to America with the complete cargo.  The first of these ships, the
"Burgerdyk", of the Holland-America Line, arrived at Hoboken last Saturday
with the initial consignment of 90,000 bulbs. The remainder are coming in on
the "Rotterdam" of the Holland-America Line, and the "Black Eagle" of the
Black Diamond Line, due tomorrow.

              The bulbs will be planted within the next ten days.  It is
essential to get them safely underground before the top crust freezes over.

              The planting plans have been worked out by the park design
forces. The tulips will be concentrated in two long stretches of terraced
ground extending from 83rd Street to 91st Street, below the Sailors and
Soldiers Monument, and from 112th Street to 115th Street, A separate planting
of 100,000 hyacinths, also a part of the Netherlands gift, will be massed in
the semi-circular area at 106-106th Streets with long plantings extending
north and south from this area.

              All of the spaces chosen for the planting are accessible to
pedestrians, who will have a close view of the flower beds and will be able
to study the varieties at leisure.  There are also elevated paths and
terraces immediately above these plantings which command a perfect view of
the entire expanse, making it possible for millions to see this floral
display during the month of May.

              The complete list of varieties of tulips to be planted has not
yet been received but there are over thirty in the first shipment, and the
range of display will cover all of the better known varieties and many not
usually seen in public plantings.  The planting on the Henry Hudson Parkway
will run the whole gamut from the marble white of the Carrara Tulip through
the vivid scarlets and oranges to the dark purple of the Black Tulip made
famous by Dumas.

              The choice of the Henry Hudson Parkway on the banks of the
Hudson River as the stage setting for this planting is peculiarly
appropriate.  It was a Dutch ship, manned by Dutch adventurers, setting sail
from Amsterdam in 1609, which explored the Hudson River for the first time,
and both the River and the Parkway now bear the name of the leader of this
expedition.

              In addition to the major display along the Hudson Paver, there
will be other smaller displays in other boroughs.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 30, 1939

                350,000 tulips, a gift from the Netherlands Bulb Growers
through their government to the City of New York, will be planted during the
next two weeks [....]

[THIS RELEASE HEAVILY CROSSED OUT BY HAND, BUT SIMILAR TO THE PREVIOUS ONE]


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 30, 1939

                     WINTER SPORTS - INDOOR AND OUTDOOR

                       The Department of Parks announces an extensive program
of winter sports activities including carnivals, skiing, ice-skating and
coasting.

                       In addition to the 21 lakes used for ice-skating in
the larger parks, 127 wading pools and 22 other suitable surfaces in various
playgrounds will be flooded and 15 tennis courts will be sprayed.

                       Thirty hills have been set aside in the parks of the
five boroughs for coasting and 13 locations have been designated for skiing.

                       Winter sports carnivals will be held on Sunday,
January 7, 1940, at 2 P.M., at each of the following locations:

   Manhattan - Conservatory Lake, Central Park near 72 Street and 5th Avenue

   Brooklyn  - Prospect Park, near Empire Boulevard and Lincoln Road

   Bronx     - Van Cortlandt Park, near West 242nd Street

   Queens    - Victory Field, near Woodhaven Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue

   Richmond  - Clove Lakes, near Victory Boulevard and Clove Road

                       There will be featured at these carnivals, events for
juveniles, juniors and seniors, including dashes and long distance
races. Exhibition of figure, pair and novelty skating will form part of the
program.

                       As a fitting climax to the borough carnivals, a
monster winter sports carnival will be held on Sunday, January 14th at 2 P,T,
at Conservatory Lake, Central Park.

                       The first three winners in each event of the
respective borough carnivals will be eligible to enter the final
championships.

                       In the event of snow, a contest in snow sculpture and
snow architecture will be held on Sunday, January 21st, at 2 P.M.  Last year,
3000 competed in this novel contest and it is expected that there will be
many more entries in 1940.

          Medals will be awarded to all winners of the winter sports carnivals
and also to the winners of the contests in snow sculpture and snow
architecture. 

           The attached list designates the respective areas for ice-skating,
skiing and coasting.

          Furthermore, the Park Department maintains and operates four indoor
gymnasia with adequate showers and dressing facilities in which are conducted
such activities as basketball, ping pong, volleyball, handball and
gymnastics.  There are located as follows:

          Manhattan - Carmine Gymnasium - Clarkson Street and 7th Avenue

                       East 54th Street Gymnasium - 342 East 54th Street
                       
                       West 134th Street Gymnasium - 35 West 134 Street

           Brooklyn  - President and 4th Avenue Gymnasium

           Basketball teams desiring to use these gymnasia are requested to
apply for the necessary permit to the Borough Director of Manhattan, Phillip
J. Cruise, Arsenal Building, Central Park, New York City or to the Borough
Director of Brooklyn, .Richard C, Jenkins, Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park
West and 5th Street, Brooklyn.

          Four other gymnasia under the jurisdiction of the Department of
Parks in the Borough of Manhattan will be open as soon as the necessary
repairs and alterations been been completed.

           Indoor swimming pools which may be used free of charge are
likewise located in each of the above gymnasium buildings in the Borough of
Manhattan and will also be included in the recreation facilities of three of
the four remaining gymnasium centers under reconstruction.

           In addition, there is a Park Department indoor swimming pool at
23rd Street and Avenue A, Manhattan, and at Metropolitan and Bedford Avenues,
Brooklyn.

           Facilities are also available in all boroughs for such outdoor
activities as: soccer, football, field hockey, roller hockey, horseshoe
pitching and handball.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 27, 1939


            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal
for the construction of two pedestrian overpasses over the Shore Parkway
section of the Belt Parkway in the Borough of Brooklyn.  These bridges will
provide pedestrian access over the Parkway to the Shore Point Promenade along
Shore Parkway between Owl's Head Park and Fort Hamilton and are located at
92nd Street and at Old Glory Overlook.

            These bridges will have a reinforced concrete deck on rolled
structural beams, with stone faced concrete approach walls and ramps.

            With the letting today, all of the 69 bridges required in the
construction of the Belt Parkway will be under contract.

             The three low bidders were:

             1, Melwood Construction Co.
                507 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C.                   116,157.45

             2, John W. Ryan Company
                369 Lexington Avenue, N.Y.C.               130,547.00

             3, Harlem Contracting Company, Inc.
                44 Exchange Place, N.Y.C.                  131,744.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 25, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that the city finals of the
six-man football tournament will take place Saturday, November 25th, at 2
P.M. at Van Cortlandt Park, 241st Street and Broadway between two Park
Department playground teams composed of boys ranging from 16 to 19
years. This contest will be preliminary to an exhibition game between two
championship teams from St. Peter's High School of Jersey City.

             This is the first time that the Department of Parks has
conducted a city-wide tournament in six-man football for playground
boys. About six weeks ago, the playground directors conducted courses of
instruction in the rules of the game followed by practice sessions.  The best
qualified team in each district of the five boroughs competed in a series of
games for the purpose of selecting the most representative teams for the
interborough contests.  The game on Saturday will determine the champion
six-man football team of New York City's Park Department playgrounds.

              Due to the fact that this game is comparatively new and
contains many radical changes in the rules of the regular eleven-man
football, thousands of spectators have been attracted to the borough
competitions. A large crowd is expected to be present, therefore, for both
the playground championship game and the exhibition game between the students
of St. Peter's High School, Jersey City, on Saturday afternoon, November
25th,

              Prizes will be awarded to the members of the winning teams of
both games.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 16, 1939


            The Department of Parks announces that the annual playground
children's Handcraft Exhibition will take place in the Education Hall of the
American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park 7Test,
beginning November 18th and running through November 26th from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m.  On Sundays, the hours will be from 1 ptm, to 5 p.m.  There will be no
admission charge.

            The Handcraft Exhibit will be in conjunction with the display of
pictures which were submitted for the recent Amateur Photo Contest conducted
annually under the auspices of the Park Department.  The pictures were
reviewed by the board of judges recently and prizes awarded to the winning
contestants.

            The Handcraft Exhibition will include objects made by children of
all age groups in the various Handcraft Classes supervised by the Department
of Parks at the numerous playgrounds under its jurisdiction as an integral
part of a comprehensive all year-round recreation program.

            The heterogeneous collection will reveal skillful leather, soap
and chip carving, raffia, reed, bead, weaving and basketry work. Useful and
decorative articles for home and school have also been made from such
materials as cork, wood, metal, leather, wool, beads, crepe paper cord and
felt.  Discarded material of all sorts has been salvaged from the waste heap
by the young craftsmen and converted into instruments of practical value,
viz. rugs made of rags, lamps made of bottles, and flower vases made from
cardboard milk containers.

            Other contributions to the handcraft display consist of wearing
apparel such as sweaters, scarfs and hats with singular designs and beautiful
color schemes.

            Demonstrations in the technique of handcraft will be given during
the exhibition by children from each of the boroughs in the following:
Leather and chip carving, basketry, bead-work, metal work, loom weaving and
hook rug construction.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 15, 1939


          Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal on
two contracts in connection with the construction of the Belt Parkway.

          One contract is for the removal of the South Brooklyn Railway
Company's tracks from its private right of way between Avenue X and Neptune
Avenue and the relocation of same in Shell Road between Avenue X and West 6th
Street and in West 6th Street from Shell Road to Neptune Avenue, together
with its sidings and other appurtenances.

           The other contract is for planting with beach grass that section of
Shore Parkway between Emmons Avenue and Cross Bay Boulevard and adds another
8˝ miles of planting along the Belt Parkway.

           The three low bidders were:

For the Reconstruction of Street Surface Railway Tracks in Shell Road:

           1.   Nicholas Di Menna & Sons, Inc.
                1525 Blondell Avenue, The Bronx, N.Y.     $ 194,638,15

           2.   Melwood Construction Corp.
                507 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C.                    196,391.60

           3.   Centau Construction Co.
                11 West 42nd Street, N.Y.C.                 198,530.60


For Planting Beach Grass from Emmons Avenue to Cross Bay Boulevard:

           1.   Roman Landscape Contracting Co.
                551 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C,                     72,000.00

           2.   John Gozo
                1625 West 6th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.         72,900.00

           3,   The Waltham Corp.
                1860 Broadway, N.Y.C.                        73,665.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 10, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that the many varieties of
chrysanthemums, now growing at the South Memorial Garden in the Conservatory
Gardens in Central Park at Fifth Avenue and 105 Street, are in full bloom and
make a very attractive display.

             The names and varieties of the chrysanthemums and colors are as
follows:

             Name of Variety                 Description

             Vera Victoria                   Tall Yellow

             Greshen Pipper                  Tall Yellow

             October Girl                    Lavender

             Normandie                       White

             Normandie                       Yellow

             Day Break                       Peach

             Romaney                         Bronze to Red

             Francis Whittersley             Rose - Pom Pon

             Captain Cook                    Rose to Pink - Small

             Barbara Cummings                Yellow shading to Orange

             Ruth Hatten                     White - Pom Pon

             Lillian Doty                    Pinkish Ihite - Small

             Anna Kuhn                       Rust - Pom Pon

             Early Bronze                    Yellow to Rust - Pom Pon

             Ruth Cummings                   Terra Cotta to Bronze

             White Doty                      White

             X-White                         White - Pom Pon

             Apollo - Korean                 Red - Single - Yellow Center

             Mars - Korean                   Red - Single - Yellow Center

             Spoon - Korean                  Various shades

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 10, 1939


             Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal
on two contracts to provide for landscaping the Shore Parkway section of the
Belt Parkway from Fort Hamilton to Coney Island Avenue.

             One contract provides for furnishing and spreading topsoil and
humus between the limits mentioned above with the planting of trees, shrubs
and vines to be performed under another contract.

             With the letting today, contracts have been let for landscaping
15 miles of the Belt Parkway with the remaining landscape contracts to follow
shortly.

             The low bidders were:

For Topsoiling Shore Parkway from Fort Hamilton to Coney Island Avenue:

             1. Granta Construction Corp.
                501 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C.                  $ 105,860,00

             2. Welsh Bros. Contracting Co.
                35 Purvis Street, L.I.C.                    106,871.60

             3. Slattery Contracting Co.
                7202-51st Avenue, Winfield, L.I.            106,905.00

For Planting Shore Parkway from Fort Hamilton to Coney Island Avenue

             1. Robt. W. Cleveland & Co.
                19 N. Harrison St., East Orange, N.J.      $ 38,355.20

             2. Grand View Nurseries
                6 Grand View Ave., Mt. Vernon, N.Y.          44,044.11

             3. Roman Landscape & Cont. Co.
                551 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C.                   52,123.70

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 6, 1939


               Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for the relocation of the lighting system at the intersection of
Southern and Cross Island Parkways from 118 Avenue to 130 Avenue in the
Borough of Queens.

               This work is being done in connection with the construction of
the Belt Parkway at this point and will replace the existing lighting which
it was necessary to move to allow for the changed alignment of the Parkway at
this intersection.

               The three low bidders were:



1. T. Frederick Jackson, Inc.
   25 West 43 Street, N.Y.C.                    15,126,00

2. Martin Epstein Company
   955 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn,              15,450.00

3. Simpson Electric Corp,
   71 East 116 Street, N. Y. C.                  15,568.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 4, 1939


              The Park Department announces that the Annual Fall
Chrysanthemum Show in the Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Greenhouse, will open on
Sunday, November 5th at 10 A.M.

              The Greenhouse is located at Prospect Park West and Ninth
Street, Brooklyn, and may be reached by way of the I.R.T. subway. Grand Army
Plaza stop, the Independent subway, 7th Avenue stop, and by the Vanderbilt
and Smith Street oar lines, Ninth Street stop, or by automobile direct to the
Greenhouse by way of the east drive in Prospect Park,

              The Exhibit will be open every day from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M., and
the Park Department extends a cordial invitation to view the display which
will be open for three weeks.

              More than four thousand pots of chrysanthemums will be on
exhibition.  The ground bed is laid out in groups of various formations with
the popular large bloom varieties in all shades of pink, yellow, red and
bronze.  Some of the attractive plants are the Pooketts, Turners, John
S. Bush, Rise of Day and the Melba.

              Surrounding this feature of the display, banked on the sides of
the Show House are numerous varieties in smaller size Chrysanthemums in 75
varieties such as the Pompons and the Anemone.

               In the class of varieties in all shades of brbnze, red, yellow
and white, some of the outstanding Chrysanthemums to be exhibited are the
Titan Tangerine Bronze, Norman Pink and Bronze, Mrs, Harrison Craig Orange
and Crimson, Betty Rose Pink and Yellow, Crimson Glow, Crimson Red.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 2, 1939


                      The Department of Parks announces that celebrations
will take place in various playgrounds during the month of November in
commemoration of their official opening to the public.

                      These playground birthday parties will feature
recitations, one-act plays and dance exhibitions comprising popular
children's dances; also tournaments in such games as checkers, chess, jacks
and ping pong.

                      Where the facilities permit, roller skating races will
be included in the playground schedule of anniversary festivities.

                      Prominent local citizens have been invited to address
the children on the advantages, both physical and mental, afforded them by
playgrounds; and also the necessity of exercising care in the use of the
equipment to prevent any unnecessary destruction of park property, which is
maintained primarily for their enjoyment at great cost to the city.

                      The November schedule for playground anniversary
celebrations is as follows:

Borough    Playground                                       Opened

Manhattan: Roof of Chelsea Health Center - 9th Avenue
           between 27th and 28th Streets                    November 2, 1937

           Harlem Housing Playground - 151 to 153 Street
           and the Harlem River                             November 2, 1937

Brooklyn:  Playground - Neptune Avenue and W, 25 Street     November 7, 1936

           Dreier-Offerman Playground, Cropsey Avenue
           and Bay 46th Street                              November 9, 1934

           Playground - South 3rd Street and Berry Street   November 12, 1937

           Playground - Sackman and Powell Streets          November 12, 1937

           Cooper Playground - Morgan Avenue and Sharon St. November 16, 1934

           Playground - Bushwick Avenue and Aberdeen St.    November 20, 1935

           Playground - Douglas and 3rd Streets             November 20, 1935

Queens:    Flushing Memorial Playground - 150 Street and
           Bayside Avenue, Flushing                         November 9, 1934

           Corona 102nd Playground - Corona Avenue, 102nd
           Street, Corona                                   November 12, 1934

Bronx:     Playground - 183 Street and Ryer Avenue          November 11, 1936

           Playground - Crotona Park East and Charlotte St. November 11, 1936

           Playground - Devoe Playground - Fordham Road
           and University Avenue                            November 22, 1936


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 31, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that it will officially open
to the public at 3 P.M. on Tuesday, October 31, 1939, three new playgrounds
located at Atlantic Avenue and 125th Street, Queens, 30th Road and 45th
Street, Queens and Bronx Park East and Reiss Place, Bronx.

             A ceremony will be held at the Atlantic Avenue and 125th Street
area in which Mayor La Guardia, Borough President George U. Harvey,
Lieut. Colonel Brehon Somervell, Work Projects Administrator of New York
City, will participate.  Park Commissioner Robert Moses will preside.

             At Atlantic Avenue and 125th Street, the new 4.3 acre playground
contains a separate children's area with wading pool, slides, see-saws and
jungle gym, as well as kindergarten apparatus and sand pit for children of
pre-school age.  The balance of the area provides six shuffleboard, one
basketball and six handball courts, two baseball diamonds, a football field,
a soccer field with turfed surface and a roller skating track which, when
sub-freezing temperature permits, may be flooded for ice skating.  There is
also a brick comfort station.

             This is the last recreational area to be opened of the three
which were originally proposed to be built in connection with the Atlantic
Avenue Improvement.  The land was acquired at the time the Board of Estimate
approved the modified plan for the Atlantic Avenue Improvement.

             At the 30th Road and 45th Street playground, the new 2.3 acre
area supplements and includes the small recreational area opened in 1937, and
rounds out the entire block, the southerly end of which was acquired by the
Board of Education for school purposes. Here the recreational facilities will
not only provide healthful benefits for the surrounding neighborhood, but
also an adequate play area for the school children during school hours.

           At this location there is a completely equipped children's
playground with kindergarten apparatus for children of pre-school age, two
softball diamonds and a large permanently surfaced area which may be flooded
for ice skating when sub-freezing temperature permits. There are also two
basketball, two volley ball, six handball and three tennis courts.

           In The Bronx, the new 1.36 acre playground in Bronx Park adjacent
to Bronx Park East opposite Reiss Place, contains one shuffleboard, four
horseshoe pitching, five paddle tennis, two volleyball and two basketball
courts, completely encircled by a roller skating track.  This facility has
been built on a former swamp area, a portion of property turned over to the
Park Department in connection with property transfered from the New York
Botanical Garden for the construction of the extension of Bronx River
Parkway.

           These three playgrounds, making a total of 303 new or
reconstructed playgrounds which have been opened by the Park Department since
January 1934, were designed by the Department of Parks and built for the Park
Department by the Work Projects Administration.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 31, 1939


         The Department of Parks announces that the exhibit of native
Brazilian birds which have formed a part of the Brazilian Exhibit at the
World's Fair has been turned over to the Park Department for safe keeping
during the winter months.

         Upon the conclusion of the Fair in 1940, the birds will be donated
to the Park Department for a. permanent display.

         The present locations and distribution of the birds are as follows:

Central Park Zoo - Manhattan

             6 Red Ibis - silvery white - head and neck black
             4 Egrets - white head and body, long black legs, beak 6 inches
             2 Night Herons, grey - head light grey - length 6 feet
             2 Shoe bill Ducks - grey body - dark grey bill
             3 Orinoco Geese (in various colors, pinkish red - beak, wings
                              red - length 2 feet
             2 Brown Ibis- head and neck brown; beak brown; legs and toes
                           green - length 2 feet

Barrett Zoo - Richmond

             5   Spoon bill Ducks - broad spoon-like beak
             8   Tree ducks - brown body, black tail, tipped with grey
             6   Red Ibis -- silvery white - head and neck black
             6   Egrets - white head and body, long black legs, beak 6 inches

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 27, 1939


                              KITE FLYING AREAS

             The Department of Parks announces that the following areas have

been designated for kite flying:

Manhattan - Randall's Island, play lawn, north of Triborough Bridge

Brooklyn  - Marine Park, Avenue U and Gerritsen Avenue

            Prospect Park, Long Meadow, east of Picnic House(nearest
               entrance at 3rd Street and Prospect Park West)

            Canarsie Park, Seaview Avenue and East 93 Street

            Red Hook Recreation Center, Bay and Court Streets

            Owls Head Park, Shore Road and 68th Street

Queens    - Alley Pond Park, picnic area, east of parking field - Winchester
              Boulevard and Grand Central Parkway, Queens Village

            Forest Park, Overlook lawn area - Park Lane and Union Turnpike,
              Kew Gardens

            Kissena Park, between the baseball diamond and upper parking
               field, Rose and Oak Avenues, Flushing

            Cunningham Park, at athletic field - 185th Street and Union
               Turnpike, Ho11is

            Juniper Valley Park, on high bank near the athletic field - Dry
               Harbor Road and 62nd Avenue, Middle Village

Bronx     - Williamsbridge Oval East, 208th Street and Bainbridge Avenue

            Van Cortlandt Park, area north of Henry Hudson Parkway,
               adjacent to Broadway and 254th Street

            St. Mary's Park - 145th Street and St. Mary's Street

Richmond  - Willowbrook Park, Richmond and Rockland Avenues

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 27, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that the city-wide finals of the
Horseshoe Pitching Tournament for boys over 18 years of age will take place
at Heckscher Playground, 62nd Street and West Drive, Central Park, Saturday,
October 28th, at 1 P.M.

           For the past two weeks eliminations have been held in the various
Park Department playgrounds of the five boroughs.

           The winner and runner up in each of the borough finals will
compete at Heckscher Playground, on Saturday for the city-wide championship.

           Prizes will be awarded to the borough winners and to those who
place 1st, 2nd, and 3rd in the city finals.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 24, 1939


The Department of Parks announces the following changes in its maintenance
and operating staff, effective, November 1st:

1. Kenneth Franklin, relieved as borough directory of Manhattan, has been
   placed in charge of the Inspection of Construction now going on in the
   Park Department for all five boroughs.

2. Philip J. Cruise, relieved as borough directory of Queens, has been
   transferred to Manhattan as director of that borough.

3. James J. Mallen, relieved as borough director of Richmond, has been
   transferred to Queens as director of that borough.

4. A.M. Anderson, formerly assigned to the Division of Design, has been
   transferred to the borough of Richmond as director of that borough.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 24, 1939


              Bids were opened on October 23,1939 by the Department of Parks on
two contracts for landscaping the Shore Parkway section of the Belt Parkway
from Owl's Head Park to Fort Hamilton.

              These contracts provide for topsoiling and planting of trees,
shrubs and vines between the limits mentioned above.

              Under previous contracts, this area has been greatly enlarged by
extensive bulkheading and filling operations to allow for proper alignment of
the Parkway which skirts the shore front along the Harrows, and to provide 23
acres of additional land east of the Parkway for park and playground
purposes.

              With the exception of the Bridges at 69th Street and at Fort
Hamilton Parkway, which are now under construction, paving and grading in the
area is now completed.

              The three low bidders were:

Topsoiling - Shore Parkway between Owl's Head Park and Fort Hamilton

1. Walter C. Reediger, Inc.
   2592 45th Street, L. I. C.               $ 30,880.00

2. Tully & DiNapoli, Inc.
   3011 12th Street, L. I. C.                 33,051,50

3. Granta Const. Corp.
   50. Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C.                 33,437.50

Planting - Shore Parkway between Owl's Head Park and Fort Hamilton

1. Roman Landscape Co.
   551 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C.                 $ 31,689.00

2. Robert W. Cleveland & Co.
   19 W. Harrison St., East Orange, N.J.      32,743.60

3. Madden & Lane, Inc.
   4216 Vernon Blvd., L. I. C.                34,253.29


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: BIDS OPENED FOR LANDSCAPING]

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                 MEMORANDUM
             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
               CITY OF NEW YORK


                October 21, 1939

TO:    A. B. Jennings
       W. H. Latham
FROM:  G. E. Spargo

               I'm not sure that I'm
right about this. Will you give me
your comments on the attached draft?


                    (signature)
                    George E. Spargo

GES:McK
Attachment

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             (Draft)

                                                October 21, 1939
Mrs. Gwendolyn Henry, Secretary
Mt. Morris Community Club
127th Street and Madison Avenue
New York City

Dear Madam:

              I have your letter proposing that the southwest corner of
Mt. Morris Park be used for baseball.

              I am sorry that we cannot do this because of the size of the
area and the number of people who must be served by the park.  Unfortunately,
because of the cost of land it is impossible for us to provide as many
baseball diamonds in the heart of the city as we would like to.  However, we
have been able to build a number of them in Central Park, Thomas Jefferson
Park and Riverside Park.  There are several others just across the Triborough
Bridge on Randall's Island.

              It is true that it is necessary for the older boys to walk a
considerable distance to reach these diamonds, but it is impossible for us to
provide them any closer to the neighborhood.  We feel that because of the
lack of space, it is necessary for us to use the area in Mt. Morris Park for
the smaller children who cannot travel any great distance to the recreation
facilities.

              Thank you for your letter and I am sorry that I cannot help
you.

                               Very truly yours,


                                    Commissioner

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           (Copy)

                                    Mt.   Morris Community Club
                                    Mt.   Morris Park
                                    127   and Madison Avenue
                                    New   York, Oct. 16, '39.


Mr. Robert E. Moses,
Commissioner of Parks,
New York, N. Y.

Dear Sir:

          The members of this club are asking you if you will consider making
the southwest corner of this park a ball field. The children of the
neighborhood have no place to play ball except in the street.

          Many schools and community centers use this area. Both boys and
girls like to play soft ball. Just now the space referred to has been planted
for a lawn.

          We thank you for some consideration of the matter.

                             Very respectfully yours,
                             THE MT. MORRIS COM. CLUB.
                         (Signed) MRS. GWENDOLYN HENRY,
                                               Secretary.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 19, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that the 473 photographs
submitted for the Amateur Photo Contest conducted by the Park Department were
reviewed by the board of judges at the Arsenal Building, Central Park.

              The entrants were divided into three age groups as follows:

              A.    Children up to 14 years of age

              B.    Children between 15 and 18 years of age

              C.    Those over 18 years of age

              Each competitor xras permitted to submit as many pictures as he
desired provided all the photographs were taken during 1939 and depicted
"Youth or Age" in the parks, pools, beaches or playgrounds under the
jurisdiction of the Department of Parks.

              The following contestants were adjudged the winners:

                                   A Group

1st Place - Alexander Weingarten - 318 East 8th Street, New York City, 14 years
                                   old - "Fountain of Youth"

2nd Place - George Kafig - 1660 Crotona Park East, Bronx, 9˝ years old -
                                                 "Bears at Play"

3rd Place - George Kafig - 1660 Crotona Park East, Bronx, 9˝ years old -
                                                 "Snow Scene"

                                   B Group

1st Place - Herbert Hamburger - 322 East 8th Street, New York City,
                                     17 years old - "Wading Thru'"

2nd Place - Walter Gottlieb - 477 St. Ann's Avenue, Bronx, 18 years old -
                                                  "Pensive Moment"
3rd Place - Martha Berger - 234 East 70th Street, New York City, 18 years old -
                                                  "An' the Doggie, Too"

Honorable Mention - Herbert Hamburger, 322 East 8th Street, New York City, 
                                                  17 years old - "Swing High"

                                   C Group

1st Place - Nathaniel Field, 625 Caton Ave, Brooklyn - "Time Out for Repairs"

2nd Place - Nathaniel Becker, 135 West 74th Street, N.Y.C. - "Friends"

3rd Place - Charles S, Wagner, Tottenville, S.I., N,Y. - "Where Cares Cease"

1st Honorable Mention - John P. Connolly, 341 E. 19th Street, N.Y.C. -
                                                  "Macombs Dam Running Track"

2nd Honorable Mention - Frederick Steiner, 1280 Commonwealth Avenue, Bronx -
                                             "Clubhouse - Mosholu Golf Course"

3rd Honorable Mention - John P, Connolly, 341 E. 19th Street, N. Y. C. -
                                              "Macombs Dam Running Track"

4th Honorable Mention - John P. Connolly, 341 E. 19th Street, N. Y. C. -
                                             "175th Street Park Pool"

5th Honorable Mention - Mrs. John Tehan, 34 Hillside Avenue, N. Y. C. -
                                              "Highbridge Pool"

6th Honorable Mention - Bernard Saltsberg, 1870 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn.-
                                              "Winter Fun"

7th Honorable Mention - John Wohlrath, 253 E. 49 Street, H.Y.C. - "White Bear"

8th Honorable Mention - Bernard Saltsberg, 1870 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn 
                                              "Patrol #3"

           The prizes consist of the following:

           One Kodak Anastigmat Special f.4,5 lens with a Compur Rapid shutter
and case, donated by R. H. Macy & Company.

           One Argus Speed Camera Model C2 donated by Willoughby's, Inc.

           One Falcon Flex Camera, donated by Abe Cohen's Exchange.

           Two Irwin Candor Camera donated by Abe Cohen's Exchange.

           Certificate entitling holder to $25,00 in photographic supplies,
donated by the Park Association of New York City, Inc.

           Nine Gallery Braquettes donated by Braquette, Inc.

           Certificates of merit will be awarded to the contestants receiving
honorable mention.

           Presentation of prizes to the winning competitors will be made by
Mrs. Arthur Hays Sulzberger, President of the Park Association of lew York
City, Inc. on Thursday, October 19th at 4 P.M. at the Arsenal Building,
Central Park.

           The judges of the contests were: Paul J. Woolf, John Gass and Paul
Schum.

           All the pictures submitted for the Amateur Photo Contest will be on
display at the Education Hall of the American Museum of Natural History, 79th
Street and Central Park "Test, in conjunction with the department's annual
handcraft exhibition which will take place on or about November 16th.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 19, 1939


            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal
for the construction of two pedestrian bridges over Cross Island Parkway at
28th Avenue and at Crocheron Park.

            The superstructure of the pedestrian bridge at the foot of 28th
Avenue consists of rolled steel beams with a wooden deck supported by timber
piles.

            The bridge at Crocheron Park is of similar construction except
that the south end is supported by a stone-faced conorete abutment.

            These bridges will provide pedestrian access over the Parkway to
the shore front along Little Neck Bay, The pedestrian bridge at 28th Avenue
is so constructed as to provide access to the new boat facilities which will
eventually be provided along this waterfront and take the place of the
existing private boat club.

            With the letting today 53 contracts have been let for the
construction of the Belt Parkway since this project was approved on October
13, 1938 for a total of $24,141,000 or 96$ of the total cost.

            These bridges are to be completed on or before May 1, 1940,

            The three low bidders were:

            Dowd-Wortman Construction Corporation        $69,616.00
            109 East 29th Street, N.Y.C.

            John G. English, Inc.                         72,550.00
            12 East 41st Street, N.Y.C,

            Kenney & Finnerty, Inc.                       76,273.95
            Vernon Boulevard & 50th Avenue
            Queens, N.Y.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: BIDS OPENED FOR PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           October 11, 1939


           The Department of Parks will officially open to the public at 4:00
P.M. on Wednesday, October 11, 1939, a reconstructed and enlarged Pulaski
Park at 133rd Street and Willis Avenue, Bronx. This is the 300th new or
reconstructed playground which has been opened by the Park Department since
the consolidation of the five borough offices in January, 1934. At that time
there were 119 playgrounds in the five boroughs and at the present time there
are 390.

           Speakers at the ceremonies will be Mayor LaGuardia, Park
Commissioner Moses, Borough President James J. Lyons of the Bronx,
Lt. Colonel Brehon B.  Somervell, Work Projects Administrator for New York
City, Michael Kwapiszewski, Deputy Commissioner General for Poland at the
World's Fair, and the Reverend Francis Szubinski, Pastor of St. Adalbert's
R. C. Church.

           October 11th, known as Pulaski Day, is the 160th anniversary of
the death of Count Casimir Pulaski, a Polish patriot and volunteer in the
American army during the Revolution. He died of wounds received during the
seige of Savannah, Georgia, on October 11, 1779.

           The park was named in honor of Pulaski ten years ago.  The
reconstruction was done by WPA forces under the jurisdiction of the
Department of Parks.

           Included in the development is a small children's playground,
equipped with apparatus and shower basin, a sitting area for mothers and
children, and a large paved recreation area containing softball
diamonds. There are also four handball courts, four horseshoe pitching
courts, four shuffleboard courts, a volleyball and basketball court included
in the park.

           Numerous representatives of various Polish fraternal organizations
will attend the ceremonies.

                                    * * *

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: PULASKI PLAYGROUND]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: PULASKI PLAYGROUND]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 8, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that a new two and one half acre
children's playground occupying the entire block bounded by Douglass Street,
DeGraw Street, Nevins Street and Third Avenue in Brooklyn, will be opened to
the public on Monday, October 9th.

           This area, which is the 299th new or reconstructed playground opened
by the Park Department since 1934, was purchased by the City of New York in
April, 1938, from the Brooklyn Union Gas Company,

           This playground, planned to accommodate all age groups, provides
the younger children with a wading pool and apparatus including swings,
slides, see-saws, and a jungle gym, A portion of the area is set aside for
roller skating and is so designed that it can be flooded in cold weather and
used for ice skating. Accommodations for older children include a soft ball
diamond, two basketball courts and eight concrete handball courts. A comfort
station is also provided.  Bordering the entire area is a new sidewalk with a
double row of trees in addition to those along the fence lines within the
playground area, amounting to about 125 in all.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 30, 1939


            PARK DEPARTMENT REGULATIONS FOR STREET TREE PLANTING


            During the Fall season, it is well to inform the public of the
regulations governing planting of trees in the City streets by private
property owners.

            Although the Department of Parks is charged with the care and
maintenance of all trees in street areas, funds are not available to plant
new trees, nor to replace trees which have died from one cause or another.

            The Department offers every form of cooperation within its power
to those who wish to plant trees in front of their property at their own
expense.  First, a permit is required.  The permit is issued, without charge,
by the office of the Park Department in the borough in which the tree is to
be planted.  The permit specifies the kind of tree, size of sidewalk,
opening, size of excavation, the amount of topsoil and fertilizer required.
The Department will inspect the planting operation to see that the owner gets
what he is paying for and will inform the property owner when the tree has
been satisfactorily planted.

            These regulations are promulgated so that the city streets may be
lined with heali±§rtrees so planted and located, that they will thrive,
and be an asset to the city and to the property owner.  Trees planted by
irresponsible contractors at abnormally low prices are seldom healthy; they
are planted with insufficient soil and plant food and rarely live. Therefore,
any tree planted without a permit may be removed by the Park Department
without notice to the property owner, unless it satisfies all conditions
which would govern the issuance of a permit for its location.

            Applications for planting trees may be obtained at the borough
offices of the Department of Parks located at:

            Manhattan:      Arsenal
                            64th Street and Fifth Avenue
                            New York City

            Brooklyn:       Litchfield Mansion
                            Prospect Park
                            Brooklyn, H.Y.

            Bronx:          Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue
                            Bronx, New York

            Queens:         The Overlook
                            Forest Park
                            Kew Gardens, New York

            Richmond:       Field House, Clove Lakes Park
                            Victory Boulevard and Clove Road
                            West Brighton, Staten Island

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 30, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that celebrations will take
place in various playgrounds during the month of October in commemoration of
their official opening to the public.

              These playground parties will feature athletic meets for boys
and girls which will include dashes, high jumping and novelty events such as
potato races, three-legged races and wheelbarrow races; also recitations,
one-act plays and dance exhibitions comprising popular children's dances.

              Where the facilities permit, roller skating races will be
included in the playground schedule of anniversary festivities.

              Prominent local citizens have been invited to address the
children on the advantages, both physical and mental, afforded them by
playgrounds; and also the necessity of exercising care in the use of the
equipment to prevent any unnecessary destruction of park property, which is
maintained primarily for their enjoyment at great cost to the City.

              The October schedule for playground anniversary celebrations is
as follows:

Borough     Playground                                   Opened

Manhattan - Essex, Norfolk and E. Houston Sts.           October 5, 1934
            Columbus - Baxter and Park Sts.              October 12, 1934
            Cherry, Monroe and Gouverneur Sts«           October 19, 1934
            Downing - Downing and Carmine Sts« W.
                      of Sixth Avenue                    October 19, 1934
            Heckscher, Central Park                      October 4, 1936
            Colonial - 153 Street & Bradhurst Ave.       October 16, 1936

Brooklyn -  Carroll - President & Carroll Sts.           October 2, 1936
            Marine - Avenue U and E. 33 Street           October 2, 1936
            Red Hook - Henry St. on Gowanus Bay          October 5, 1937
            West End of Leiv Eiriksson - 8 Av & 66 St.   October 12, 1934
            Fulton and Classon Avenues                   October 28, 1934
            Bedford Ave. and Ave. X                      October 14, 1935
            Ocean Parkway and Avenue P                   October 14, 1935
            Park Avenue and Taafe Place                  October 28, 1934
            Williamsburg Housing - Scholes St, Graham Av.October 29, 1937
            37th and 38th Sts, and Dahill Rd.            October 29, 1937
            Avenue U - 58th-60th Streets                 October 30, 1936

Bronx     - Fort #4-Reservoir Ave.,Sedgwick & Webb Aves. October 14, 1934
            Teasdale Place - 164 St, E. of Boston Rd.    October 14, 1935
            Spofford Avenue and Faile St,                October 14, 1935
            Macombs Dam South - Sedgwick Ave.,
               Jerome Ave. & Exterior St,                October 14, 1935

Queens    - Thompson Hill - 47 Ave. & 43 St., L.I.C.     October 25, 1937


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 30, 1939


        The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the paddle
tennis tournament for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds will
take place on Saturday, September 30th at the North Meadow Playground,
96th Street and Central Park, according to the following schedule:

        10:30 A.M. - Junior and Senior Singles - Girls

        11:30 A.M. - Junior and Senior Doubles - Girls

         2:00 P.M. - Junior and Senior Singles - Boys

         3:00 P.M. - Junior and Senior Doubles - Boys

        Finals of the shuffleboard tournament for men and women over 18
years of age, will likewise be held at the North Meadow Playground,
Saturday, September 30th at 2:30 P.M.

        There will be one man and one woman representative from each
borough in this tourney.

        Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to first,
second and third place winners respectively in each contest.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 29, 1939


         It was announced earlier in the week that 5,000 begonia plants
would be given away at Orohard Beach on Sunday, October 1st, at 8:30 A.M.

         It has been found necessary to rescind this because of the demand
for the plants from hospitals, schools and other public institutions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 27, 1939


            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks for the
construction of three bridges on the Shore Parkway section of the Belt
Parkway system.

            These bridges will carry the parkway traffic over Fresh Creek,
Hendrix Creek and Spring Creek respectively, on two roadways separated by a
center mall.  In each case the superstructure consists of rolled structural
steel beams with a reinforced concrete deck. Minimum clearances of 20 feet 4
inches above mean high water will be provided at the Hendrix Creek and Spring
Creek Bridges while the Fresh Creek Bridge will allow a clearance of 21 feet
above mean high water.

            With today's letting all of the sixty vehicular bridges required
            for the construction of the Belt Parkway will be under contract.

            To date fifty-two Belt Parkway contracts have been let since this
project was approved on October 13, 1938 for a total of $24,118,926 or 96% of
the total cost.

            The three low bidders were:

            Johnson, Drake & Piper            $707,633.75
            Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

            P. J. Carlin Construction Co.      761,190.00
            405 Lexington Avenue, N.Y.

            Elmhurst Contracting Co.           768,770.50
            5304 97th Place, Corona, L. I.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: BIDS RECEIVED FOR BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 27, 1939


          The Department of Parks announces that a new three-quarter acre
children's playground in Bronx Park at Bronx Park East between Waring
Avenue and Thwaite Place will be opened for use on Thursday, September 28th.

          This playground is part of the development of property transferred
in 1937 by the New York Botanical Garden to the Department of Parks; and is a
unit in a chain of children's recreation areas already built or now under
construction along the easterly boundaries of Bronx Park.  Another play area
to the south is well advanced and several others further north are planned
for the future.

          This new recreation area provides a completely equipped children's
playground with a wading pool and a comfort station.  In addition to two sand
pits for small children, there is a variety of apparatus including
kindergarten and playground swings, a jungle gym, slides, horizontal ladder,
and parallel bars.  Permanent concrete benches and shade trees are provided
in ample numbers.

          This is the 298th new or reconstructed playground completed by the
Park Department since 1934.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: NEW BRONX PLAYGROUND]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[MAP: NEW BRONX PLAYGROUND]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 25, 1939


            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks for the
construction of a cellular steel sheet bulkhead, 566 feet in length, at Sound
View Park in the Bronx.

            This bulkhead will carry an unloading platform with a concrete
deck to support the machinery of the Department of Sanitation.  The contract
also provides for the construction of a mooring platform 16 feet wide and 191
feet long for barges and for dredging a channel to permit these barges to
reach the bulkhead.

            This is the first step in the construction of Sound View Park and
will permit the Department of Sanitation to proceed to fill this area and
abandon filling operations at Riker's Island.  It will take eighteen months
for them to complete the fill and, in the meantime, detailed plans and
specifications are being prepared by the Park Department for the park
development so that when the Department of Sanitation's work has progressed
sufficiently, construction of the park can be started.

            With filling operations abandoned on Riker's Island, work will
start on the use of this filled land as a prison farm and a large nursery for
the Department of Parks.

            The three lowest bidders were:

1   Stock Construction Corp.
    1735 Grand Central Terminal, N.Y.C.                   $227,500.00

2   Merritt-Chapman & Scott Corp.
    17 Battery Place, N. Y. C.                             231,181.00

3   Senior & Palmer
    50 Church Street, N.Y.C.                               244,000.00

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[MAP: BID OPENING FOR CONSTRUCTION OF BULKHEAD]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 25, 1939


           Bids were received today by the Department of Parks which will
permit the construction of five jetties along the beach front at Jacob Riis
Park, Borough of Queens.

           The bath house, built some years ago, is located so close to the
water that at high tide there is no beach in front of this building for the
bathers to use.  A hydraulic fill contract, now in progress, is placing
approximately 400,000 cubic yards of sand for the extension of the beach in
front of the Park and Neponsit Hospital.  This additional sand will increase
the usable beach at Jacob Hiis Park by twenty-five acres.

           The jetties, approximately 500 feet long, will be constructed of
steel sheet piles with a concrete coping and of timber permeable groins, and
will act as protection for the sand beach which is being constructed.

           The three lowest bidders are:

1.   Bethlehem Construction & Utilities Co.
     59 Bank Street, N, Y. C.                        $64,515.00

2.   Stock Construction Corp.
     1735 Grand Central Terminal, N.Y.C.              68,700.00

3.   Madden & Lane
     4216 YernonBlvd., L. I. C.                       69,365.00

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[MAP: BID OPENING FOR CONSTRUCTION OF JETTIES]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 22, 1939


          The Department of Parks announces the opening of nine new tennis
courts upon Randall's Island on Saturday, September 23rd.  These courts are
available for play by any holder of a regular Park Department tennis permit
on the same conditions as the other tennis courts in the Park system.  These
courts are part of a battery of twenty-three under construction.  The balance
of these courts will be opened as construction work is completed.

          All the courts in this location are clay surfaced and have been
constructed according to the latest approved methods to insure quick drainage
and excellent playing conditions.  Some of these courts were used for the
National Public Parks Tennis Championship, which was completed on schedule in
spite of two rainy days, due to the quick drying qualities of the courts.

           There are no locker or dressing room facilities on the site of the
courts, but players can be accomodated for the balance of the season, free of
charge at the adjacent Triborough Stadium, on days on which there are no
events at the Stadium.

          Plans have been prepared for the erection of a concrete bleacher
seating approximately 2000 persons and housing dressing facilities, but at
the moment no funds are available to go ahead with this work.  Construction
of this unit will proceed just as soon as sufficient money is available.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 22, 1939

           In connection with the resurfacing program for existing park
roads, the Department of Parks opened bids today at the Arsenal Building,
64th Street and Fifth Avenue on contracts for repaving a portion of Mosholu
Parkway from Navy Avenue to Gun Hill Road, and for the Park Drive in Van
Cortlandt Park from Bailey Avenue at Van Cortlandt Park south in a northerly
direction, a distance of approximately 900 linear feet.  Both projects are
located in the Borough of the Bronx.

           The work will consist of resurfacing the existing roadways with
asphaltic concrete, including the reconstruction of curb and sidewalk,
rebuilding and additions to the drainage system, topsoiling and
reconstruction of the lighting systems where necessary.

           Reconstruction of the Mosholu Parkway project and the sections
completed last spring will provide an entire new roadway in Mosholu Parkway
from Gun Hill Road to Van Cortlandt Avenue East.

           The following bids were received for the Mosholu Avenue project:

           Del Balso Construction Corporation              $24,843.75
           220 East 42 Street, N. Y. C.

           Charles D. Beckwith, Inc.                        25,122.00
           Seneca Ave. & Bronx River, Bronx, N.Y.

           Amiesite Construction Corporation                25,482.00
           Mt. Vernon, New York

           Bids for Park Drive in Van Cortlandt Park were:

           Charles D. Beckwith, Inc.                       $ 9,935.00
           Seneca Ave. & Bronx River, Bronx, N.Y,

           Amiesite Construction Corporation                10,455,50
           Mt. Vernon, New York

           Del Balso Construction Corporation               11,051.50
           220 East 42 Street, N. Y. C.

           Each of the projects is to be completed within 60 days.

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[MAP: BIDS OPENING FOR RESURFACING MOSHOLU AVE]

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[MAP: BIDS OPENING FOR RESURFACING PARK DRIVE]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 22, 1939


              The Department of Parks will officially open to the public at
2:30 P.M, on Friday, September 22nd, the new athletic and recreation centre
in Van Cortlandt Park. The area is located between 240th and 242nd Streets on
Broadway.  Speakers at the ceremony will be Mayor La Guardia, Park
Commissioner Moses, Borough President James J. Lyons of the Bronx, and Lt.
Colonel Brehon B. Somervell, Work Projects Administrator for New York City.

              As part of the ceremonies, there will be a football exhibition
by the Varsity squads of Manhattan College and Fordham University, also,
several track events including an invitation 1000-yard medley relay in which
teams of the Grand Street Boys, St. Anselm's A.C., Lenox Hill A.C., and New
York Pioneer Club will compete. The Park Department Band will render
selections throughout the opening ceremonies. There will also be tennis,
handball and horseshoe pitching matches, basketball and softball games by the
respective championship teams of the borough playgrounds.

              This 21.5 acre area was formerly a swamp, being the course of
Tibbett's Brook.  It was filled by the Department of Sanitation during
1933. The present construction was started during 1937, The facility
comprises a concrete stadium with a seating capacity of 3,000.  There is a
quarter-mile running track, three baseball diamonds, three football fields,
six handball courts, sixteen hard surfaced tennis courts, four horseshoe
pitching courts, children's playground with wading pool, two large paved
recreation areas containing basketball courts and softball diamond.

              The perimeter of the area is completely landscaped and equipped
with paths. Flood lighting will permit evening use of these facilities. Band
concerts and dancing will be added to activities during the summer months.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 18, 1939

            Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks on two
contracts to provide for landscaping Cross Island Parkway section of the Belt
Parkway from Creedmoor State Hospital to Laurelton Parkway and Southern
Parkway from Laurelton Parkway to Rockaway Boulevard.

            One contract provides for furnishing and spreading topsoil and
humus between the limits mentioned above with the planting of trees, shrubs,
vines and seeding to be performed under the other contract.

            Construction work in this area is sufficiently advanced to allow
for landscaping work to proceed immediately after the award of the contracts.

            With the letting today, fifty-one contracts have been let for the
construction of the Belt Parkway since this project was approved on October
13, 1938 for a total of $23,364,000 or 94% of the total cost.

            Included in the above are contracts providing for landscaping
8˝ miles of the Belt Parkway and other contracts for landscaping are being
made ready for letting as soon as construction operations permit.

            The low bidders were:

For Topsoiling, Cross Island Parkway from Creedmoor State Hospital to Laurelton
Parkway and Southern Parkway from Laurelton Parkway to 158th Street:

            1. Tully & DiNapoli
               30-11 12th Street, Long Island City                 $58,751.00

            2. Grand View Nurseries
               Mt. Vernon, N.Y.                                     64,240.00

            3. Slattery Construction Corp.
               72-02 51st Avenue, Winfield, L.I.                    69,900.00

For Landscaping - Cross Island Parkway from Creedmoor State Hospital to
Laurelton Parkway and Southern Parkway from Laurelton Parkway to 158th Street:

            1. Grand View Nurseries, Mt. Vernon, N.Y.              $96,385.39

            2. Roman Landscaping Co., 551 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C.       100,330.59

            3. Walthaw Corporation, 1860 Broadway, N.Y.C.          109,281.65

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 14, 1939


                The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Annual American Ballad competition, popularly known as the Barber Shop
Quartet Contest, as well as the finals of the city-wide Gibson Girl Trios,
will take place on the Mall in Central Park on Thursday, September 14, at
8:30 P.M.

               This annual event features the rendition of songs that were
popular with the tenors of the early 1900's and each quartet and trio will be
costumed in the dress of that period.  The finals are composed of two leading
quartets chosen in elimination contests in each of the five boroughs with the
addition of a quartet group from Bloomfield, New Jersey, who are the
undisputed champions of Essex County.  The Girls' Trios comprise two from the
Bronx, two from Brooklyn and one from Manhattan.  Prizes will be awarded to
first, second and third place winners in each competition who will be
selected by the judges on the basis of tone, harmony, musical interpretation
and costume.

               The judges are headed by Mayor La Guardia and include Governor
Alfred E.  Smith, Doctor Sigmund Spaeth, the celebrated tune detective and
author of Barber Shop Ballads, and Jack Norworth of the team of Norworth and
Bayes, famed in musical comedy three decades ago.

               An added fillip is given to this year's contest by its
sponsorship by the International Group recently formed under the corporate
name of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop
Quartet Singing in America.  Mayor La Guardia was recently made the Chairman
of the lew York City Chapter of the S.P.E.B.S.Q.S.A. and Governor Smith is a
Vice-Chairman. Doctor Spaeth is on the Advisory Board. The winning quartet
will be automatically enrolled as members of this new chapter.  It is also
hoped that the best quartet of the State of Michigan will fly east to
participate as a last minute entry.

               The Park Department Band of sixty pieces will play before,
during and after the singing and will furnish the music of old favorites
which will be sung by the audience under the leadership of Doctor Spaeth.

               Because of the great interest the Borough Eliminations
aroused, it is expected that the 1200 seats on the Mall will be filled to
capacity for the Finals and the Park Department suggests that the public
arrive at 8 o'clock.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 11, 1939


               The Department of Parks announces that the 15 outdoor swimming
pools located in the various boroughs and also the bath houses located at
Jacob Riis Park, Orchard Beach and Coney Island closed Sunday evening,
September 10th.  However, the game areas at these three beaches and at
Rockaway Parkway will remain open free of charge to patrons who will bring
their own equipment. Parking will also be free at Orchard Beach after
September 10th end at Jacob Riis Park after September 17th.

              During the past season 2,442,439 people hr.ve used the swimming
pools, of which 860,216 were children admitted free of charge, 907,396 were
children who paid 10˘ admission and 674,827 adults who paid 20˘
admission. This year, for the first time, Saturday morning was included in
the free periods for children, giving them six mornings a week instead of the
five free mornings they had last yenr.

               Orchard Beach was visited by 2,219,935 prtrons. Jacob Riis
Perk wes visited by 1,622,215 patrons. The revenue derived from Orchard Berch
this yeer was $114,049.70 and from Jacob Riis Prrk $89,918.60.

               At both Jacob Riis Park end Orchard Besch the food concessions
will remain open for late season visitors. The pitch-putt course at Jecob
Riis Park will be open daily for the balance of the golfing serson end the
present charge of 50˘ for each round played will prevail.

               The staffs at the large outdoor pools will begin immediately
to put them in readiness for recreation activities which will be carried on
until the swimming season commences next year. They v/ill be open as play
centers free to the public from 2 P.M. until 10 P.M. on weekdays and from
10A.M. to 6 P.M. on Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays, beginning Saturday
morning, September 16th.  Facilities for basketball, volley ball, paddle
tennis, shuffleboard end handball l be available in the outside pool area and
during inclement weather such games as ping pong, checkers, quoits and
various group games will be held indoors.

            Although the outdoor swimming pools will be closed, this does not
mean the end of the swimming season as the Park Department operates six
indoor swimming pools in Manhattan and one in Brooklyn, free of charge to the
public.  These pools, all of which have been remodeled by Work Relief forces
since their transfer from the Borough Presidents to the Park Department, are
located as follows:

            Manhattan:   Carmine Street and Sixth Avenue
                         23rd Street end Avenue "A"
                         409 West 28th Street
                         232 West 60th Street
                         35 West 134th Street
                         324 East 54th Street

            Brooklyn:    Metropolitan, and Bedford Avenues


            In addition, reconstructed indoor pools at 5 Rutgers Place, Cherry
and Oliver Streets, and 384 Rivington Street will be opened before the end of
the year.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 11, 1939


            The New York City Parkway Authority announced today that their
engineers are proceeding with the preparation of detailed plans to carry out
the widening and improvement of Cross Bay Boulevard between Howard Beach and
the toll booths of the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge at the south end of Big Egg
Marsh.

            Big Egg Marsh has been a problem ever since the State assigned
the marshlands of Jamaica Bay to the City for navigation and other commercial
purposes in 1909 and 1912, and the City leased property to a private company
in 1915. This company pumped in some fill and sublet the property so that
today there are approximately 1,000 families living in this community in
houses which they built themselves end which they own, but upon lend which is
leased from the City.  The present lease expires in 1945.

            For years some of the people living in the community have
recommended that the City take over the operation of the community and
arrange to sell the property to the present tenants or others so that the
community might be permanently established. Nothing satisfactory came of
these suggestions and each renewal of the lease brought new complications.
In 1935, the Broad Channel Corporation's lease was renewed for a ten year
period.

            In 1938, when the approaches to the new Cross Bay Pcrkway Bridge
were planned, it was obvious that something would have to be done to improve
the northerly approach to the bridge.  This led to the study of the
complicated problem of ownership on Big Egg Marsh end resulted in the
recommendation early in 1939 by the Park Commissioner that an act be
introduced in the State Legislature which would clear up the question of
title to the property and make it possible for the City to sell or lease the
lend, thereby recognizing this settlement as a permanent community.  It also
provided that the revenue derived from the leases and sale of property be put
in a special fund which is to be used by the New York City Parkway Authority
for the design and construction of the Cross Bay Boulevard.  There was
opposition from a minority in Broad Channel to the passage of this act, but
the City Council finally recommended approval to the Legislature and the act
became Chapter 788 of the Laws of 1939.

          A study of the lease by the Parkway Authority end by the
Corporation Counsel showed that it was questionable whether the lessee had
complied with certain terms and conditions of the lease as amended in
1935. As a result of this, action was started in the courts to evict the
tenant, but after months of negotiation this case was settled and an
agreement has been signed by both the City and the Broad Channel Corporation
by which the City assumes the responsibility of the landlord on October 1st
of this year.

          The attached letter is being sent by the Park Commissioner to the
Board of Estimate asking for an appropriation of $40,000 for the use of the
New York City Parkway Authority in the preparation of contract plans for this
construction and $10,000 for use of the Director of Real Estate in operating
the area.  While it was originally intended to construct a two hundred foot
parkway through the island, further survey showed that this was not feasible.
Under the present plan, approximately 5 feet will be taken back of the
building line on both sides of the street so as to give the right-of-way a
total width of 110 feet. There will be a ten foot sidewalk on each side of
the street end the north and south traffic will be separated by a 6 foot
mall.  Both north and southbound pavements will be 42 feet wide and will
provide for three moving lanes of traffic in each direction and one parking
lane for the use of the local people. Under the new plan it is only necessary
to move 60 structures from their present lots and this is made essential
because of the bad curves in the road at the north end of the existing
community.  In addition to the widenings through the portion of the island
which is built up, plans call for the repaving of the northerly portion of
the highway and the resurfacing of the bridge over Grassy Bay.

          The Borough President of Queens is working on the reconstruction of
Woodhaven Boulevard from Forest Park to Liberty Avenue.  It is expected that
this portion of the work will be completed by the Borough President and
opened to traffic early next summer. The portion of the work to be done by
the New York City Parkway Authority will also be completed at that time. This
will mark the completion oT a job which was started 15 years ago when
construction began on the Cross Bay Boulevard, and will provide a through
artery from Queens Boulevard to the Rockaway shore, a distance of 11 miles.

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                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                             September 8, 1939        GEORGE E. SPARGO
                                                        CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
                                                      JAMES A. DAWSON
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                                                      JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                       
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         

Board of Estimate
Municipal Building
New York City

Gentlemen:

          Chapter 788 of the Laws of 1939 amended the New York City Parkway
Authority law to permit the Authority to reconstruct Cross Bay Boulevard
from the north end of the Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge to the Belt Parkway.

          The Park Department has studied the matter in an attempt to
determine the most economical and satisfactory method of handling this
highway reconstruction and I believe that it will be possible for us to
provide an adequate approach to the Rockaways across these islands without
adversely affecting the community. Preliminary plans indicate that only 59
houses will have to be moved. However, it is necessary that detailed plans be
prepared showing the location of buildings, property lines, etc., before any
decision is made and the map submitted to the Board of Estimate and the
Planning Commission shov/ing the final lines of this highway.

          On June 29, 1939 (Calendar No. 159) your Board approved an
agreement between the City of New York and the Broad Channel Corporation
which provided, among other things, for the division of funds collected from
the tenants during the present season. The State Law provides that the monies
obtained shall be paid into the city treasury to reimburse the city for
expenses made in connection with the design and reconstruction of this
highway.

          There is approximately $80,000 in the joint account set up in
accordance with the agreement and approximately $30,000 of this amount can be
withdrawn and made available for the use of the city at the present time.  It
is estimated that it will cost the New York City Parkway Authority $40,000 to
prepare plans and specifications for the reconstruction of this roadway.

          Starting October 1st, the maintenance and operation of this city
property will be the responsibility of the Director of Real Estate of the
Board of Estimate and he estimates that the required amount of money for
personal service to do this work from October 1, 1939 to July 1, 1940 will be
$10,000.

          I ask that your Board appropriate $40,000 to be made available to
the New York City Parkway Authority for the preparation of plans,
specifications and estimates of cost for the reconstruction of this highway
and that the sum of $10,000 be appropriated for the use of the Director of
Real Estate of the Board of Estimate for personal service required by him to
operate this development.

                                        Very truly yours,

                                            Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          September 7, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that on September 8th, 9th
and 10th at Central Park approximately 3000 playground boys and girls will
participate in a demonstration of recreational activities embracing in part,
team and group games, folk dancing, singing, dramatics, children's oircus,
handcraft and magic.

              One of the feature attractions of this comprehensive program
will bo the children's circus in which several hundred children from various
playgrounds in the Borough of Queens will take part on Friday, September 8th,
at 2:00 P. M.  at the Sheep Meadow, Central Park.  The circus opens with a
spectacular parade of freaks, wild animals, acrobats, clowns and bare-back
riders followed by the acts which will take place in and around a regulation
saw-dust circus ring.

              The outstanding event on the program for Saturday, September
9th at 2:30 P. M. at the Sheep Meadow, Central Park will be the folk dance
festival in which 600 girls, ranging from 8 to 16 yoars, from playgrounds in
Manhattan and Brooklyn will participator The dance costumes were made by the
young performers and are patterned on the style of dress of the country whoso
dance is being demonstrated.

               The finals of the musical instrument contest is also scheduled
to take place on Saturday, September 9th, at 8:00 P. M. on the Mall, Central
Park.  Each of the contestants has successfully competed in the borough
eliminations.  The following persons have been invited to act as judges:
Fredorique Potrides, conductor of the Orchestrette Classique, Rudolph
Wurlitzer, of the Wurlitzer Company, and Herman Katims, pianist and composer
of "Knickerbocker on Parade" and "No Longer".

              Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awardsd to the 1st, 2nd
and 3rd place winners respectively.

               Sunday's program wi11 feature the finals of the playground
children's magic contest arranged for 2:30 P. M. on the Mall, Central Park.
The following prominent mombers of the magic fraternity have consented to act
as judges; Charles Hoffman, who s appearing in "Streets of Paris", William
Kroiger, magic entertainer, and Charles Larson, who owns the largest
collection of magic in the world.

              Models will be presented to those who place 1st, 2nd and 3rd in
each division.

              The Park Department Band will play selections for the children's
circus, folk dance festival and magic contest.

              Attached is a copy of the complete program of activities which
will take place during the three day demonstration.

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[MAGIC PROGRAM OMITTED - SEE PDF]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 29, 1939


                  The New York City Parkway Authority announces that at 8:55
A.M. today, the two millionth car passed over the new Cross Bay Parkway
Bridge, which links the Rockaways with the main traffic arteries and parkway
system in Queens.


                   The car was driven by Bernhard B. Christ, Jr, of
522 Beach 140th Street, Belle Harbor, Rockaway.

                   This new and improved traffic facility was opened on
Saturday, June 3, 1939. The widened viaduct roadways, the parkway plaza
approach and shore front park and drive in the Rockaways, all part of the
Rockaway Improvement undertaken by the New York City Parkway Authority, are
drawing a record volume of summer visitors to the Rockaways.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 26, 1939


       The Department of Parks announces that the new softball diamond at
Jacob Riis Park will open on Saturday afternoon, August 26th, with a game
between the Highland Park Yankees and the Idlewild Team of Tan Wyck
Playground.

        This new softball diamond is located just east of the bath house,
adjacent to the boardwalk.  Bleachers have been provided and there will be no
admission charge.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 26, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that the two acre playground
bounded by Bradford, Edison, LaSalle and Waterbury Avenues, in the Borough of
The Bronx, will be opened to the general public without ceremony on Saturday,
August 26th.

              This area was acquired by the city in April, 1938, in
connection with the acquisition of the right of way required for the
extension of the Hutchinson River Parkway from its present terminus in
Pelham Bay Park to the Bronx Whitestone Bridge, Other areas, similarly
located adjacent to this and other parkway rights of way, were acquired at
the same time. It has been the policy of the Department to provide these
local areas wherever possible in connection with these major arterial
improvements so that the local people can benefit by the improvement which
would otherwise be mainly for the passing motorist.

              This playground was planned by the Department of Parks and the
work performed by the Work Projects Administration.  Besides a completely
equipped children's playground with wading pool, it includes eight handball
courts, a softball diamond and a large asphalt surfaced play area which can
be used for roller skating, and when subfreezing temperatures permit during
winter months, may be used for ice skating.  There is also a comfort station
and recreation building.

              Bordering the entire area and separating the small children's
playground and the handball courts from the baseball area, are landscaped
areas planted with shade trees. Permanent concrete benches have been included
in the development to provide a resting place for those waiting for their
turn to play, as well as for mothers and guardians of the small children.

              This is the 296th new and reconstructed playground added to
the park system since 1934.

                                    *****

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 26, 1939

         The 25,000,000th car passed over the Henry Hudson Bridge which spans
the Harlem River Ship Canal at Spuyten Duyvil on Friday, August 25, at 12:20
P.M. The car which was northbound was driven by Charles E. Mapes, 6117
Tyndall Avenue, Riverdale, The Bronx, a wire chief for the New York Telephone
Company. He was presented by the New York City Parkway Authority not only
with the usual free book of fifty tickets but also received a souvenir cake
topped by a replica of the Henry Hudson Bridge and by twenty-five candles.

         The Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge was constructed and is operated by
the New York City Parkway Authority. In addition to this structure the Marine
Parkway Bridge, spanning Rockaway Inlet between the foot of Flatbush Avenue
in Brooklyn and Jacob Riis Park in Queens, which was opened on July 3, 1937,
has had a total traffic of 4,701,757 cars while the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge,
opened on June 3rd of this year, has had 1,905,972.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 25, 1939


          Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks on two contracts
to provide for landscaping Cross Island Parkway from the Whitestone Bridge
Intersection to Fort Totten.

          One contract provides for furnishing and spreading topsoil and
humus between the limits mentioned above, with the planting of trees, shrubs,
vines and seeding to be performed under the other contract.

          These contracts are the first of a series to be let for landscaping
the Belt Parkway.

          Construction work in this area, including grading, paving and the
erection of bridges has advanced to such a stage that landscaping work can
proceed immediately after the award of these contracts.

          With the letting of today's contracts, forty-nine contracts
have been let for the construction of the Belt Parkway since the
project was approved on October 13, 1938 for a total of $23,209,000
or 93% of the total cost.

          The low bidders were:

For Topsoiling, Cross Island Parkway from Whitestone Parkway to Fort Totten

          Grant Park Construction Corporation                      $76,255.00
          65 Prospect Avenue, Hewlett, L. I.

          Tully & DiNapoli                                          76,530.00
          30-11 12th Street, L. I. C.

          Grand View Nurseries                                      82,510.00
          Mt. Vernon, New York

For Planting Cross Island Parkway from Whitestone Parkway to Fort Totten

          Grant Park Construction Corporation                      $48,416.70
          65 Prospect Avenue, Hewlett, L. I.
 
          Grand View Nurseries                                      49,165.19
          Mt. Vernon, New York

          Walthaw Corporation                                       49,563.80
          1860 Broadway, N. Y. C.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 24, 1939


          The Department of Parks announces that the Fourth Annual Swimming
and Diving Championships will be held at 1 P. M. on Friday, August 25th at
Astoria Pool, Barclay Street and 24th Drive, Astoria.

          Teams from Astoria, Crotona, McCarren, Sunset, Red Hook, Betsy
Head, Highbridge, Thomas Jefferson, Hamilton Fish, Colonial, East 23rd, the
96th Street Floating Pool, Tompkinsville and Faber Pools will compete for the
championship, which has been won in the past three years by the team
representing Astoria Pool.

          Eliminations have been carried on daily at the various pools to
determine the make-up of various teams.

          The Department of Parks Band will be on hand to entertain the
spectators between the events.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                           FOR RELEASE: Thursday,
Tel. Regent 4-1000                                           August 24, 1939


         The Park Department announced today that they turned over to the
Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity the new laboratory building
at Underhill Avenue and Park Place in Brooklyn.  This building replaces the
old laboratory located on Flatbush Avenue just south of the new library.

         The old laboratory was formerly a gate house for the reservoir,
which was built in 1861 and reconstructed as a laboratory in 1897.  The work
done in this small outmoded laboratory was probably more important to the
health of the people of the City of New York than any other single operation
in the city.  All of the city's water has been tested in this building for
the last forty-two years.  A few years ago the reservoir was abandoned and
the city approved the plan to use the land for park purposes.  To complete
the clean-up of this section adjacent to the new library it was necessary to
find a new site for the laboratory.

         The new building was constructed by the Park Department on the site
of an old pumping station at Park Place and Underhill Avenue and is one of
the most modern laboratories in the world for the analysis of water.  The
work of this laboratory has served as an example to various municipalities
throughout the world for years.  This new building is a model which can well
be copied by the representatives of these municipalities who visit New York
City for the purpose of studying the analysis of our water supply.

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DEPARTMENT OF
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                               FOR RELEASE: August 22,P.M.
Tel. Regent 4-1000                                        August 23, 1939, A.M.

         The Department of Parks announces that the Second Annual Lifeguard
Championship will be held Wednesday afternoon, 2 P.M. on August 23rd, at
Beach 95th Street, Rockaway Beach.  Teams from Orchard Beach, Jacob Riis
Park, Coney Island, South Beach and the Rockaways will compete for the
Mayor's trophy, emblematic of the lifeguard championship.  Besides the team
championships, there will be events to determine the individual championship
of the lifeguards at the beaches under the jurisdiction of the Department of
Parks.

          Events for the teams will be individual surf rescue race, rescue
race with equipment, two man boat rescue race, and a one mile boat race.  For
the individual championship, the events will be individual surf rescue,
individual boat race, and an individual boat rescue race.

         The Mayor's Trophy was won last year by the team representing the
east end of Rockaway Beach, with a score of 31 points.  The team from Coney
Island finished second with 30 points.  The lifeguards have been practicing
daily for this meet and competition is expected to be very keen.

          The Coast Guard station at Rockaway Point will give a rescue boat
turn-over drill at 1:30 P.M.  The Department of Parks Band will be on hand to
entertain the spectators between events.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 22, 1939


              After years of agitation, in April, 1931 the Transit Commission
ordered the removal of all crossings on the Rockaway Beach Division of the
Long Island Railroad through the section of the Borough of Queens known as
Aqueduct and along the Rockaway Peninsula.  Other crossings of varying
degrees of importance were removed from time to time, but the process was
cumbersome and the progress slow.  The New York State Constitutional
Convention held last summer proposed an amendment to the Constitution (which
was approved by the voters in November) providing the means for speedy
elimination of the various crossings throughout the State.  The problem
varies in various sections of the State and, as far as New York City is
concerned, the amendment was drawn to fit existing conditions.  Although
$300,000,000. was made available for grade crossing eliminations in 1925, a
balance of approximately $170,000,000, remained for this purpose when the new
amendment was approved by the voters last fall.  With the approval of this
amendment, $50,000,000. was set aside for the elimination of grade crossings
within the City of New York.

              Even before the legislation was enacted to carry out the
proposed Constitutional Amendment, the City of New York appropriated
$200,000, for the use of the Long Island Railroad for the preparation of
plans to eliminate the crossings on Atlantic Avenue and on the Rockaway Beach
Division of the railroad.  These plans, prepared by the Railroad Company,
anticipate the acquisition by the City of this transit facility as a part of
the City's rapid transit system.

              The proposed amendment to the Constitution was approved by the
Convention on July 19, 1938, it was approved by the voters in November, 1938;
the City appropriated funds for design on November 17, 1938; the Wicks Bill,
which furnished the legislation to carry out this amendment, became Chapter
289 of the Laws of 1939 on April 14, 1939; the contract for the elimination
of crossings in the Aqueduct section of the Borough of Queens was awarded to
the Wilson and English Construction Company on August 15, 1939 by the Transit
Commission; and the work on the elimination started today.  This is more
action than has ever before been seen on grade crossing matters any place in
the State in so short a period of time.

              This all started when the Board of Estimate decided to struggle
again with the grade crossing problem on Atlantic Avenue, and Mayor La
Guardia appointed a committee composed of the Borough President of Brooklyn,
the Borough President of Queens, and the Comptroller to report on this
matter, and further appointed the Park Commissioner to represent him on the
grade crossing problem.  Subsequently, as a delegate to the Convention, the
Park Commissioner became the Chairman of the Committee on Highways, Parkways,
and Grade Crossings, and has since been the Mayor's representative on these
grade crossing matters, most of which are closely allied with the City's
park, parkway and arterial highway program.

           The Aqueduct elimination includes five bridges which upon
completion will adequately take care of the east-west traffic in this section
of the island.  They are located at Linden Boulevard, Pitkin Avenue, Southern
Parkway, the north service road of the parkway and the south service road of
the parkway.  The total cost of this section of the work is estimated at
$1,450,000.  The electrical work including signals, etc., is being done by
the Long Island Railroad and is estimated to cost $500,000, and the contract
for the construction of the bridges, grading, etc. was let to the Wilson and
English Construction Company, who bid $950,000. for this portion of the work.
In addition to the crossing elimination, this contract will take care of the
station facilities at Aqueduct for the community and for the Aqueduct race
track, and involves track changes between Rockaway Boulevard and the Howard
Beach station, a distance of one and one-quarter miles.  During construction,
temporary detours will be built so that the temporary bridge which exists at
the present time carrying the Sunrise Highway over the railroad, can be
removed and the tracks elevated at this point.  Three of the bridges will
take care of the traffic on the Belt Parkway and the two parkway service
roads,and the work has been scheduled in such a way as to permit the use of
these structures by July 1, 1940, the date of completion of the twenty-eight
million dollar Belt Parkway project.

           The major portion of the problem of eliminating the crossing on
the Rockaway Beach Division of the railroad is on the Rockaway peninsula
itself, where it is necessary to elevate the tracks for a distance of five
and one-half miles, and where grade crossings exist at the present time at
frequent intervals between Beach 108th Street and Mott Avenue.  The estimated
cost of construction of this portion of the work is §11,600,000.  The New
York City Parkway Authority has just completed the Rockaway Improvement,
which included the extensive beach development between Beach 73rd and Beach
109th Streets, the reconstruction of the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge, and
convenient highway approaches to this portion of the beach.  All of this work
has been coordinated with and anticipates the grade crossing improvement
which is now progressing.

           In addition to the elimination of the crossings at grade, this
project will furnish as an incidental improvement (permitted under the new
grade crossing act) a four lane highway for its entire length.

         At the present time, the Rockaway peninsula has but one through
east-west artery known as Beach Channel Drive and the various extensions of
that Drive known by other names, which provide a scant four lanes of traffic,
two in each direction.  There are other east-west roads but none furnish a
satisfactory through route from one end of the peninsula to the other.

          The new artery will connect at the westerly extremity with Beach
Channel Drive and Beach 116th Street, At the easterly end near the Nassau
County line, this new highway connects with Regina Boulevard.  Those who are
familiar with the traffic conditions in the Rockaways know that north and
south traffic across the peninsula will present no problem after removal of
the grade crossings, but that the east-west traffic is a distinct problem
which will be greatly relieved with the construction of this new highway.
Contract plans and specifications for the work on the peninsula are ready to
be advertised by the Transit Commission and it is expected that the first
contract will be let in about one month.  Work will proceed as rapidly as
possible and it will be completed in a period of two years.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 22, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces today that bids have been
taken for a planting contract in City Hall Park. The work under this contract
will complete the park development now under way in the old Federal Post
Office area.

             In the Capital Outlay Budget for 1940 the Park Department has
requested $340,000. for the restoration of the balance of the City Hall Park
area with the exception of that area now occupied by the County Court House.

             The three low bidders were:

       1. Specimen Nurseries, Inc.
          2 Bushy Avenue, Yonkers, N.Y.      $4,493.62

       2. General Landscape Corp.
          Chrysler Building, New York City    4,528.31

       3. Madden & Lane
          42-16 Vernon Boulevard
          Long Island City, N.Y.              4,623.93

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 18, 1939


               Bids were opened by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal for
the reconstruction of Culver Rapid Transit Railroad at Shell Road in Brooklyn
to permit sufficient head room for traffic on the Belt Parkway.

               Bids were opened also for the grading at Baisley Pond Park on
the Southern Parkway section of the Belt Parkway in Queens.

               The contract for the reconstruction of the Culver Elevated
Line at the three level grade crossing at Shell Road provides for the raising
of 890 feet of the railroad, a maximum of six feet, so that Shell Road nay be
passed under the Parkway and the Parkway itself will run at grade with a
maximum clearance of fourteen feet.  The work will be progressed so as not to
interfere with the operation of the railroad.  The plans and specifications
for this joint contract were prepared by the Board of Transportation in
collaboration with the Department of Parks.

               The contract for the grading at Baisley Pond Park provides the
necessary drainage for the adjacent section of Southern Parkway, and the
filling of the swampy park area between Rockaway Boulevard and Southern
Parkway, the first step in the final development of this section of the park.

               With the letting of today's contracts, forty-seven contracts
have been let since the project was approved on October 13, 1938 for a total
of $23,084,484 or 92 l/2 per cent of the total cost.

               The grading at Baisley Pond Park on the Southern Parkway
section of the Belt Parkway in Queens is to be completed on or before
November 4, 1939.

               The three low bidders were:

Slattery Contracting Company
7202 - 51st Avenue, Winfield, N. Y.                        $29,725.

Wm. P. McDonald Construction Co.
33-15 Lawrence Street, Flushing, L. I.                      30,720.

Welsh Brothers Contracting Co,
35 Purvis Street, Long Island City                          32,277.50

               The contract for the reconstruction of Culver Rapid Transit
Railroad at Shell Road in Brooklyn is to be completed on or before March 15,
1940.

               The three low bidders were:

Centaur Construction Co., Inc.
11 West 42nd Street, New York City                          $98,652.50

Lieb Construction Company, Inc.
415 Lexington Avenue, N. Y. C.                              122,380.00

Groves-Quinn Corp,
Grand Central Terminal, N. Y. C.                            127,730.00

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FROM: Public Information Section
      Work Projects Administration
      70 Columbus Avenue, New York City                August 16, 1959
      Circle 6-4000, Ext. 786
                                                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


              Lieut. Col. Brehon Somervell, Work Projects Administrator for
New York City, made public yesterday a tabulated summary of the physical
accomplishments of the WPA Division of Operations in the five boroughs during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1939. The Division of Operations is the
organization's construction and engineering division.

              Various types of public buildings head the list, with 308 new
structures erected and 635 buildings repaired and modernized during the year,
including 30 additions. Work in progress on June 50, not included in these
totals, comprised 76 new buildings, and repairs and improvements to 230
buildings, including 13 additions. New buildings in progress included two
public schools, four fire houses, three police stations, seven aircraft
hangars, three warehouses and five garages. Repairs were in progress on 18
schools, 27 hospital buildings, 11 administrative buildings and 17
recreational buildings.  In the slum clearance program, 2,072 buildings were
demolished during the year.

               A total of 190.2 miles of new highways were constructed, of
which 151 miles were paved, and 211.6 miles of existing highways, including
107.4 miles of paved road, were repaired.  New road construction in progress
at the end of the period totalled 45.5 miles of which 36 miles were paved.
One of seven new bridges built was a steel structure 2,000 feet long.  At the
end of the period, repairs were in progress on 11 steel bridges, totalling
14,065 feet in length. Related highway work completed during the year
included 218.4 miles of new curbs laid, with 42.5 miles of curb still in
progress, 20 miles of guardrails and guardwalls, and 21,047 feet of roadside
drainage ditch dug.  New sidewalks totalled 150.9 miles, of which 123.7 miles
were paved, and an additional 28.4 miles of paved sidewalks and eight miles
of unpaved paths were in progress at the end of the year.

               Recreational facilities built during the year, exclusive of
buildings, include 10 new athletic fields and the remodelling of eight
others; and fourteen new parks, squares and triangles, adding 210.3 acres to
the city's park system, with renovation work on 25 existing park areas
totalling 16,868 acres. Fifteen new school playgrounds were constructed
during the year and repairs were made to twelve others. New playgrounds
constructed for the Department of Parks totalled 43, with repairs to nine
others. Fourteen new wading pools were built. On June 30, work was still in
progress on seven more new athletic fields, one new park area of 9.7 acres
and the repair of areas totalling 1,541.9 acres, three new school playgrounds
and 24 Department of Parks playgrounds, twenty new wading pools, 82 tennis
courts, 152 handball courts and eight skating rinks.

               Completed additions to the city's water supply system included
106.3 miles of water mains, with 11.1 miles more in progress. The
modernization and extension of the city's sewer system comprised the
construction of 54.3 miles of new sanitary and storm sewers and the repair
and rebuilding of 34 miles of existing sewers, with 5.6 miles of new sewers
still uncompleted at the end of the period. Marsh drainage and mosquito
control work included the digging of 308.3 miles of new drainage ditch, the
newly drained area amounting to 6,076.5 acres, and repairs to 45.6 miles of
existing ditch. Drainage pipe laid in addition to that laid for roadside
drainage totalled 15.6 miles.

               In waterfront improvements, repairs were completed to 18 piers
with an area of 1,087,829 square feet and two abandoned piers were demolished.
Two new piers with an area of 54,750 square feet are now being built for the
city.

              Two breakwaters were built, an existing breakwater was
repaired, a total of 3,327 linear feet of bulkheads was built and repairs
were made to 12,198 feet of existing bulKheads. Retaining walls snd
revetments to a total length of 19,461 feet were built and additional walls
aggregating 4,690 feet in length are in progress.

              Two power houses with a total capacity of 2,000 kilowatts are
in course of construction. Thirty-three miles of electric transmission and
power distribution lines, and 6.7 miles of telephone and telegraph lines were
laid. In the expansion of the police traffic signal and fire alarm telegraph
systems a total of 141.4 miles of cable was laid in underground conduits, the
work entailing the digging of the ditch, the laying of the conduit and
pulling the cable through. Work is in progress on an additional 7.4 miles of
these lines. Five miles of steam distribution lines were laid.

               Exclusive of park work, the WPA carried on landscaping
operations on 672.4 acres, with work on 411 acres still in progress.

               The tabulated summary of completed work in Greater New York
for the fiscal year from July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1939 follows:

                                             NEW             REPAIRS AND
                                        CONSTRUCTION         IMPROVEMENTS

PUBLIC BUILDINGS                                308               633

  Schools                                                          85
  Libraries                                                        20
  Recreational Buildings                          7                 9
  Hospitals                                                        65
  Baby health stations and other
     institutional buildings                     19                 5
  Courthouses and other administra-
     tive buildings                               8               101
  Dormitories                                     6                23
  Fire houses                                     4                63
  Police stations                                                  15
  Garages                                        17                25
  Aircraft hangars                                                  4
  Warehouses                                      9                51
  Armories                                                         12
  Other buildings                               238               155

DEMOLITION OF BUILDINGS                                         2,072

HIGHWAYS

   Highways - paved                          151 miles            104.4 miles
   Highways - unpaved                         40.8 miles           92.3 miles
   Bridges                                     7                   54
   Culverts                                   10                   22
   Sidewalks - paved                         123.7 miles           80.8 miles
   Sidewalks and paths · unpaved              27.2 miles            6.7 miles
   Curbs                                     218.4 miles          110.2 miles
   Gutters                                    15.7 miles          1 5.  miles
   Guard rails and gtiard walls               20.1 miles            0.6 miles
   Lights for roads and streets              326                  149
   Roadside drainage - ditoh              21,047   feet         1,520   feet
   Roadside drainage - pipe                6,571   feet            12   feet
   Roadside landscaping                       23.5 miles           18.1 miles
   Street signs made                      27,800
   Removal of car tracks                                           13.1 miles

AIRPORTS
   Runways                                 3,032 feet
   Air beacons                                 1
   Air markers                               377

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
   Athletic fields                            10                    8
   Parks, squares and triangles               14                   25
   Playgrounds - school                       15                   12
   Playgrounds - other                        43                    9
   Wading pools                               14                   20
   Tennis courts                              61
   Handball courts                           191
   Horseshoe courts                           79
   Skating rinks                               6
   Bridle paths                                1.6 miles

WATER SUPPLY

  Water mains                                106.3 miles           53 miles
  Consumer connections                     5,955
  Storage tanks                                5
  Gate houses                                                       1
  Water treatment plants                                            4
  Pumping stations                             1                    4

SEWERS AND DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

   Storm and sanitary sewers                  54.3 miles           34 miles
   Service Connections                     2,492                4,948
   Manholes and catch basins               4,878                1,696
   Septic tanks                               13
   Sewage treatment plants                                         10
   Mosquito control - ditch                  308.3 miles           46.5 miles
   Mosquito control - area drained         6,076.5 acres          106.2 acres
   Mosquito control - spray used          56,464   gallons
   Drainage pipe laid (other than
      roadside)                               15.6 miles

PIERS, BREAKWATERS, RIVERFRONT IMPROVEMENTS

   Piers repaired                                                  18
   Piers demolished                                                 2
   Breakwaters                                 2                    1
   Bulkheads                               3,327 linear ft.    12,198 linear ft
   River bank improvements                     2.4 miles
   Stream bed improvements                     6.5 miles
   Riprap                                  5,504 square yards
   Retaining walls and revetments         19,461 linear ft.     6,110 linear ft

ELECTRICAL LINES

   Transmission lines                         20.9 miles
   Power distribution lines                   12.2 miles
   Consumer connections                      141
   Telephone and telegraph lines               6.7 miles
   Police traffic and fire alarm signals     141.4 miles

LANDSCAPING

  Landscaping (exclusive of parks)           358.3 acres          211 acres
  Lighting airports, packing lots,
     athletic fields, etc                    879 acres             68 acres
  Fountains and ornamental pools              36
  Fencing                                     40.7 miles            8.3 miles

MISCELLANEOUS CONSTRUCTION

   Paving (other than roads, walks and
      runways)                           809,791 sq. yds.      44,313 sq. yds.
   Tunnels                                 1,300 feet           6,276 feet
   Monuments and historic markers                              12,760
   Gas lines                               8,975 feet           6,321 feet
   Excavation or fill                 10,981,472 cu. yds.
   Clearing and grubbing                   1,619.9 acres
   Grading                                   740 acres            529.7 acres
   Setting benches                         5,399

PRODUCTION OF ARTICLES

   Concrete articles                     100,475
   Cement blocks                       1,250,379
   Wooden articles                        12,403

CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES

   Planting beach grass                       75.5 acres
   Trees and plants planted                7,507
   Trees trimmed                          11,890
   Noxious plant eradication                  52.5 acres
   Spray treatments (except
      mosquito control)                      185.5 acres
   Surveys conducted                          58

MISCELLANEOUS

   Articles of furniture repaired          9,178
   Public buildings oleaned                   30
   Lots cleared                            9,461.6 acres

                         ###########################

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 14, 1939


          Today, on the sixty-ninth anniversary of the death of Admiral
Farragut, the Department of Parks announces the completion of the renovation
of the monument by Augustus Saint Gaudens dedicated to his memory.

          This refurbished bronze statue of David Glasgow Farragut, hero of
Mobile Bay and the first American to bear the title of Admiral, was
originally unveiled in the north end of Madison Square Park on May 25th, 1881.

          In 1934, when the five separate Park Departments were consolidated
into the present City-wide Department, a survey of the monument showed that
the bluestone pedestal, designed by Stanford Unite, was eroding and
disintegrating so rapidly that immediate provisions would have to be made to
prevent further deterioration.  Through the efforts of various art societies
and the Art Commission, in cooperation with the Department of Parks, a WPA
Sculptors Project was expanded to include its renovation.  Coopersburg,
Pennsylvania black granite was selected as the material best suited to resist
the ravages of time and to match in color and texture the Hudson River
bluestone which formed the original pedestal. The most skilled artisans
available, under the direction of Walter Beretta, were employed to reproduce
faithfully the original. All carving and cutting was done on the site, most
of it in a wooden enclosure which was built around the monument to protect it
from further deterioration. The resulting replica is without doubt a
technical achievement.

          The monument base takes the shape of a classic elliptic exedra.
Atop the pedestal proper, on which is carved a design of waves crossed by a
sword, stands the full size bronze figure of Farragut. The right wing of the
exedra bears in bas-relief a seated female figure representing "Loyalty" and
the left wing a seated female figure representing "Courage".  The spaces
beyond the figures are completely filled with long inscriptions, the
lettering of which is so modeled as to play an important part in the general
decorative effect, The inscriptions are:

Right wing:

             BORN NEAR KNOXVILLE TENNESSEE JULY V MDCCCI
             MIDSHIPMAN MDCCCX
             BATTLE OF ESSEX AND PHOEBE MARCH XXVIII MDCCCXIV
             LIEUTENANT MDCCCXXV
             COMMANDER MDCCCXLI
             CAPTAIN MDCCCLV
             BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS APRIL 2X7 MDCCCLXII
             REAR ADMIRAL MDCCCLXII
             BATTLE OF MOBILE BAY AUGUST V MDCCCLXIV
             VICE ADMIRAL DECEMBER XXIII MDCCCLXIV
             FIRST ADMIRAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA JULY XX7I MDCCCLXVI
             DIED AT PORTSMOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE AUGUST XIV MDCCCLXX
Left wing:

             THAT THE MEMORY OF A DARING AND SAGACIOUS COMMANDER AND
             GENTLE GREAT SOULED MAN
             WHOSE LIFE FROM CHILDHOOD WAS GIVEN TO HIS COUNTRY
             BUT WHO SERVED HER SUPREMELY IN THE WAR FOR THE UNION
             MDCCCLXI - MDCCCLXV,
             MAY BE PRESERVED AND HONORED AND
             THAT THEY WHO COME AFTER HIM AND
             WHO WILL OWE HIM SO MUCH MAY SEE HIM
             AS HE WAS SEEN BY FRIEND AND FOE
             HIS COUNTRYMEN HAVE SET UP THIS MONUMENT
             A.D. MDCCCLXXXI.

Each of the arms of the seat is formed by the curved back of a sculptored
fish.  The monument sets on a terrace in the center of which is imbedded a
bronze crab.  The terrace is approached by three semi-circular steps.

             Reproducing the monument offered an opportunity of correcting
construction faults which existed in the original.  The bluestone monument
was composed of 52 pieces.  This type of construction could not resist the
vibrations caused by traffic and the expansion of water freezing in the
jointing.  The renovated monument is composed of only 18 pieces, each wing of
the exedra being a solid block weighing 16 tons when quarried and reduced to
9 tons finished.

             The new foundation is of a cradle type developed for use where
permanency is paramount.

             The missing sword and trappings which were removed by vandals
from the bronze statue were modeled, cast and replaced. The bronze was
cleaned and a mellow brown patina applied.

             A lead box, found in the 6riginal foundation was placed in a
vault under the terrace of the replica.

              Officials of The Augustus Saint Gaudens Memorial Museum at
Cornish, New Hampshire are negotiating to borrow the original pedestal to
preserve and exhibit it in a safe and suitable place.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 14, 1939


                           RANDALL'S ISLAND TENNIS
                                   COURTS


                 In line with the Department of Parks' policy of developing
Randall's Island as an active recreational center for the general public,
construction of a battery of 23 new tennis courts is now nearing completion
by the Works Progress Administration.  These courts are all clay surfaced, of
the most modern construction, and should become the most populer tennis
center in the City.  Locker rooms and shower facilities are now available on
a daily basis at the adjacent Triborough Stadium.  Parking is free.

                 These courts lend themselves admirably to exhibition and
tournament play. The two center courts are surrounded by an eight foot
asphalt walk, back of which there is ample space for bleachers to seat
approximately 2000 people, for the accommodation of exhibition and
outstanding tournament matches. At the present time, temporary bleachers are
being used.  It is hoped that when funds are available, a concrete bleacher,
containing comfort stations end locker rooms, will be built along the west
side of these central exhibition courts.

                 Six of the courts were completed several weeks ago and have
been in use for the Metropolitan Public Parks Championship Tournament, which
was completed yesterday.  Today the National Public Parks and Playgrounds
Tennis Association Tournament will get under way, after a reception end flag
reising at the Court of Sports at the World's Fair at 10 o'clock this
morning.  Admission will be free from Monday at 1 P.M. through Thursday.  On
Friday, Saturday and Sunday a charge of 25˘ for admission will be
mede. With the exception of Monday, when play begins at 1 P.M., matches will
begin at 10 A.M. each day. Seventeen courts ere ready for use in this
tournament.

                  After the tournament, the courts will be closed down for
a short time to oomplete construction work on all twenty-three
courts, and then opened for play by Park Department permit holders.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 11, 1939


              Bids were opened by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal for
the construction of four bridges on Shore Parkway and Southern Parkway
sections of the Belt Parkway system.

              The Cohancy Street Bridge is a stone faced double span, rein-
forced concrete bridge carrying pedestrian traffic on two side walks and
two-way vehicular traffic over Southern Parkway.

              The Southern Parkway Intersection Bridge east of Cross Bay
Boulevard is a two span bridge, the superstructure of which consists of
rolled structural steel beams with a reinforced concrete deck and will
 carry pedestrian traffic on one sidewalk and eastbound Southern Parkway
vehicular traffic over Shore Parkway.

              The Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge has four spans whose rolled
structural steel superstructure is supported at intermediate points by stone
faced reinforced concrete piers. The entire structure is supported by closed
and steel pipe piles. This bridge will carry pedestrian traffic on two
sidewalks and two-way Cross Bay Boulevard vehicular traffics over Shore
Parkway.

              The Fairfield Avenue Bridge has two spans, the superstructure
of which consists also of rolled structural steel beams with a reinforced
concrete deck. The entire structure is supported by closed end steel pipe
piles. This bridge carries two way Shore Parkway traffic over Fairfield
Avenue.

              With the letting of today's contract, fifty-nine of the
sixty-six bridges required for the construction of the Belt Parkway, will be
under contract.

              To date forty-five contracts have been let since the project
was approved on October 13, 1938 for a total of $22,956,107. or 92% of the
total cost.

              The work under this contract is to be completed on or before
May 15, 1940,

              The three low bidders were:

              Tomasetti Construction Co.                     $1,024,577,75
              1066 - 60th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

              Johnson, Drake & Piper, Inc.                    1,045,996.50
              Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

              ELmhurst Contracting Co., Inc.                  1,059,931,00
              5304 - 97th Place
              Corona, long Island, N.Y.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 11, 1939


             The Police Department and the Department of Parks announce that on
Friday, August 11, 1939 at 4 P.M. a new police station building at 135th Street
and 12th Avenue will be officially opened with ceremonies, at which Mayor
LaGuardia, Police Commissioner Valentine and other City officials will
participate.

             This new police precinct will be officially known as the 26th
Precinct and will include the area between the curb line of the east sidewalk
of Riverside Drive and the Hudson River, from 72nd Street to Harlem River,
including the Henry Hudson Parkway and all park property within this area.

             Formerly, this territory was included in the tail end of four
separate police precincts and the establishment of this new precinct has been
made necessary by the heavy usage of the Henry Hudson Parkway and the
completed West Side Improvement, on which nearly $25,000,000 has been spent
to provide a wide variety of both passive and active recreational facilities
for all age groups.

             These new improvements, which include promenades, children's
playgrounds, soft ball diamonds, baseball and football fields, roller skating
areas, bicycle paths, basketball, handball, horseshoe, shuffle board, paddle
tennis and tennis courts, an area set aside for outdoor dancing, parking
fields, and boat basin for pleasure craft, all fitted into a comprehensive
landscape scheme, have increased tremendously the number of people using the
park area.  It was therefore extremely important that a new precinct be set
up in the Police Departament which would have supervisien over this territory
that that the same men would remain constantly assigned to the park areas and
beoome thoroughly acquainted with park supervision and protection. This
precinct will also have complete control over traffic on the Henry Hudson
Parkway from 72nd Street to the Henry Hudson Bridge, which will secure a
better patrol of the parkway than would otherwise be had.

            Acting Captain Albert Douglas has been assigned to command this
new precinct. He will be assisted by three Lieutenants, six Sergeants and
fifty-nine patrolmen, permanently assigned to this command.  There will be
three radio motor patrol sectors in addition to a large number of motorcycle
and foot traffic patrolmen, as well as one Sergeant in command of six
detectives.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 9, 1939


         The Department of Parks announces that the finals for the water polo
tournament which has been under way for the past few weeks at the Municipal
Swimming Pools, will be held on Thursday evening, August 10th, 7 P.M., at the
Thomas Jefferson Swimming Pool, located at 112th Street and First Avenue.

            Ten teams competed in the tournament with Hamilton Fish Swimming
Pool beating Tompkinsville and Red Hook and Astoria Swimming Pool beating
McCarren, Thomas Jefferson and 96th Street Floating Baths. These two teams
will be the finalists for the championship.

         Teams from Red Hook, Betsy Head, Hamilton Fish, Tompkinsville, 96th
Street, Carmine Street, Astoria, McCarren, Thomas Jefferson and 23rd Street
Swimming Pools competed in the tournament.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 9, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that the 1.83 acre
playground, bounded by Atlantic Avenue, 95th Avenue, 88th and 89th Streets,
Queens, will be opened to the general public without ceremony on Thursday,
August 10.  This is the second recreation area to be opea«d of the three
which were originally proposed to be built in connection with the Atlantic
Avenue Improvement. The playground at Linwood and Elton Streets was opened
some months ago. The land was acquired at the time the Board of Estimate
approved the modified plan for the Atlantic Avenue Improvement, the
playground was designed by the Department of Parks, and built for the Park
Department by the Works Progress Administration.

              The small children's area in the southerly part of the
playground contains various types of play equipment, a wading pool, and a
sand pit.  The balance of the area is taken up with basketball, volleyball,
and handball courts, a softball diamond and a roller skating track which,
when sub-freezing temperatures permit, may be flooded for iceskating.  There
is a comfort station in the area.

              Bordering the playground and separating the handball courts
and the children's section from the softball diamond and roller skating
track, is an area landscaped with shrubbery and shade trees.

              This is the 294th new and reconstructed playground added to
the park system since 1934.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 7, 1939


        The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the annual
American Ballad Contest, popularly known as the "Barber Shop Quartet
Constest" will take place on the Mall, Central Park, Thursday, September 14th
at 8:30 P.M.

        This annual event will include the rendition of songs that were
popular with the tenors of the early part of the present century.  Each
quartet will be costumed in attire befitting this era.

        The program on that evening shall also include girls' trios composed
of vocalists over 16 years of age.  Each member of the trio is required to
wear costumes reminiscent of the same decade and their repertoire shall
likewise embrace songs renowned in that period.

        Appropriate prizes will be awarded to the winners in each
competition.

        According to the rules of both contests, each male quartet and
girl trio must participate in the borough eliminations before they can
qualify as finalists. Two quartets and one girls' trio will be selected
to represent each borough on the evening of September 14th.

        The respective borough preliminaries will be held during the
last two weeks in August at the following locations:

        Manhattan - Washington Square Park
        Bronx - Poe Park, East 192nd Street and Grand Concourse
        Brooklyn - Prospect Park, Music Grove, Empire Boulevard Entrance
        Queens - Forest Park, Music Grove, Main Drive off Woodhaven Blvd.
        Richmond - McDonald Playground, Forest and Myrtle Avenues
        Long Island and Metropolitan Districts - Quartets outside of
        city limits, but within the Metropolitan area, may compete
        in a special division.

        It is suggested that any male quartet or girls' trio interested in
these contests should communicate with the Park Directors in charge of the
borough in which they reside for further information regarding the rules of
the contests and the specific dates of the eliminations.

        The names and addresses of the various Directors are as follows:

Manhattan - Kenneth S. Franklin
            Arsenal Building
            Central Park
            New York City

Brooklyn  - Richard C. Jenkins
            Litchfield Mansion
            Prospect Park West and 5th Street
            Prospect Park
            Brooklyn, New York

Queens    - Philip J. Cruise
            The Overlook
            Forest Park, Kew Gardens, L,I»

Bronx     - George L. Quigley
            Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue
            Bronx Park, Bronx, New York

Richmond  - James J. Mallen
            Cloves Lakes Park
            Clove Road, West of Victory Boulevard
            Staten Island, New York

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 7, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces that the second amateur
photographic contest depicting "Youth and Age in Our City Parks and
Playgrounds will be held on Wednesday, September 20, 1939.

              All pictures submitted by the contestants must represent scenes
in parks, parkways, pools beaches and playgrounds under the jurisdiction of
the Department of Parks during the year 1939.

              The initial amateur photography contest conducted by the Park
Department last year indicated such widespread interest on the part of both
children and adults that it was decided to classify the entrants according to
the following age groups:

              Class A - Children up to 14 years

              Class B - Children between 15 and 18 years of age

              Class C - Persons over 18 years of age

                   Rules governing the contest are:

              1. All pictures must be 8˝ x 10 prints and mounted on
                 stiff paper or cardboard.

              2. The name, address and age group of the contestant
                 should be clearly written on the reverse side of
                 each picture submitted.

              3. The Department of Parks shall have the right to
                 reproduce and use any picture submitted for park
                 purposes.

              4. Negatives must be available upon request.

              5. Contestant may submit no more than five pictures.

              6. Pictures may show Spring, Summer, Fall or Winter Activities.

              7. The decision of the judges shall be final in all cases.

              Appropriate prizes will be awarded to the three contestants in
each age group who submit the best pictures. No competitor is eligible to win
more than one prize.

              Every one desirous of entering the contest is requested to
submit his photographs at any time up to September 10th inclusive to the
Borough Director of the borough in which he resides. The ad- dresses of the
various borough directors are:

Manhattan - - - Kenneth Franklin, Arsenal Building, Central Park
                                 64th Street & 5 Avenue, N. Y. C.
Brooklyn - - - Richard Jenkins, Litchfield Mansion, 5th Street and
                                 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Bronx - - - George Quigley, Administration Building, last Bronx and
                                 Birchall Avenue, Bronx, N.Y.
Queens - - - Philip Cruise, Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens, Queens, N.Y.
Richmond - - - James Mallen, Clove Lakes, New Brighton, Richmond, N.Y.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 4, 1939


              The Department of Parks announces the completion of a large
playground in Brooklyn, a somewhat smaller playground in Queens, and a
bicycle path running along Ocean Parkway between Prospect Park and Coney
Island. The two new recreation areas which will be opened to the public
on Saturday monring, August 5, bring the total of new and reconstructed
playgrounds built since January, 1934 to 293.

              The Brooklyn playground, in Lincoln Terrace Park, is one of the
most intensively developed recreational areas that has been constructed by
the Park Department.  It is thirteen acres in size and contains a large open
play area for group games for older children, a small children's playground
completely equipped with apparatus and wading pool, and a kindergarten area
furnished with sand pit, play houses and miniature equipment. It also has
nine double handball courts, two softball diamonds, and a roller skating area
which will be used for ice skating during the winter.  There is also a
full-sized baseball diamond with permanent concrete bleachers accomodating
one thousand spectators, besides basketball courts, paddle tennis,
shuffleboard, and horseshoe pitching courts. These facilities are sorely
needed in this section of Brooklyn, especially since the large temporary
playgrounds developed on the property of the Brooklyn Ash Removal Company,
fronting on Remsen Avenue, have had to be relinquished to the owners.

             The playground area is on two levels, the upper one, between
President and Carroll Streets, having been formerly used as a playground,
while the lower triangular-shaped level, between Carroll Street and East New
York Avenue, was not developed until the present improvement was undertaken
with WPA labor. The entire recreational development is surrounded by
landscaped areas planted with trees and hardy shrubs, and hundred of benches
advantageously placed will serve the guardians of children as well as
participants in the various activities and spectators.

             With the completion of this large playground, the Works Progress
Administration has shunted their construction forces into the upper portion
of Lincoln Terrace Park, a dilapidated area which will be completely
redesigned to meet present day conditions, and to serve those seeking passive
recreation and relaxation.  An area across Buffalo Avenue from the other two
areas, is developed with eleven tennis courts which were opened to the public
in 1934. When the park work proper is completed, the entire area, consisting
of twenty and two-third acres, will become one of the most model recreational
plants in the five boroughs, catering to the needs of every age group and
every interest.

          In Queens, the new playground is located at Braddock Avenue and 240
Street, in the Queens Village section, where a three and one half acre plot,
on which there is a fine stand of mature shade trees, was acquired as an
adjacent playground site in connection with the Belt Parkway, from which it
is three blocks distant. A feature of this playground is a large oval lawn
surrounded by a roller skating rink. A comfort station for boys and girls
lies between this lawn and a large modern wading pool. All age groups seeking
active recreation will be satisfied from the small children who have a
kindergarten area with sand pit and small apparatus, the older children with
larger apparatus and ample space for group games, and the adolescents for
whom six handball courts, five shuffleboard courts, three horseshoe pitching
courts, a basketball court and two soft ball diamonds have been installed.
In the winter, the southern third of the playground, where the softball and
basketball facilities are located, can be flooded to provide an acre of ice
surface.

          The bicycle path on Ocean Parkway is five and one half miles long
and was formed by the conversion of the west mall, between Prospect Park and
Coney Island, into a parallel bicycle-pedestrian promenade. It is complete
except for a few blocks either side of Guider Avenue at which point Belt
Parkway construction now under way will delay completion until next summer.

          The need for taking children off public streets where they are
constantly threatened with bodily injury and off sidewalks where they are a
problem to pedestrians, as well as providing healthful exercise for many
adults, made it imperative that each section be opened informally as rapidly
as completion of the work permitted usage with reasonable safety.

          The bicycling activity already evidenced on parts completed
indicates that the enthusiasm and interest on the part of the general public
in bicycling has in no way diminished.

          While the concrete surfaced bike path is segregated from the bench
lined pedestrian promenade by a fence, it is hoped that bicyclists will
observe traffic rulles and particularly traffic lights at the intersecting
streets, thereby decreasing the number of pedestrians injured by reckless
bike riders.

          Uniformed park personnel on bicycles are patrolling the path.

                                    * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 4, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that celebrations will
take place in various playgrounds during the month of August in
commemoration of their official opening to the public.

             These playground birthday parties will feature athletic meets
for boys and girls which will include dashes, high jumping and novelty events
such as egg and spoon races, potato races, three-legged races and wheelbarrow
races; also recitations, one-act plays and dance exhibitions comprising
popular children's dances.

             Wading pools in these recreation areas will likewise be
the scene of joyous splashes in the form of well known water sports
and tournaments for kindergarten children.

             Where the facilities permit, softball games will be included in
the playground schedule of anniversary festivities.

             Prominent local citizens have been invited to address the
children on the advantages, both physical and mental, afforded them by
playgrounds and also the necessity of exercising care in the use of the
equipment to prevent any unnecessary destruction of park property, which is
maintained primarily for their enjoyment at great cost to the city.

             The August schedule for playground anniversary celebrations
is as follows:

Borough                     Playground                          Opened

Manhattan    -   Lewis and Rivington Street               August 11, 1934
                 83 Roosevelt                             August 11, 1934
                 Corlears Hook Extension                  August 11, 1934
                 Kelly                                    August 11, 1934
                 95 Thompson                              August 11, 1934
                 West 59th Street, 11th Avenue            August 21, 1936

Brooklyn     -   3rd and 4th Streets, 4th and 5th Aves,   August 11, 1934
                 Atlantic, Fountain-Sunrise               August 11, 1934
                 E, 95th Street, Avenues K - L            August 11, 1934
                 Betsy Head                               August 15, 1936
                 Red Hook (Large children's playground)   August 20, 1937

Bronx        -   141st Street and Brook Avenue            August 18, 1934
                 St. Mary's West                          August 15, 1938

Queens       -   Liberty Park                             August 5, 1937
Richmond     -   Model Playground, Jewett and Castleton   August 11, 1934
                                          Avenues


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 4, 1939


           Bids were opened by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal for the
construction of two grade separations at Fort Hamilton Parkway and at 69th
Street on the Shore Parkway section of the Belt Parkway System.

           The bridge at Fort Hamilton Parkway is a double span stone faced
reinforced concrete structure and carries access drives which connect Shore
Parkway with 4th Avenue. The bridge at 69th Street is a single span of
structural steel and will carry the parkway traffic over 69th Street, thus
providing access to the ferry which runs from this point to Staten Island.

           With the letting of today's contract, fifty-five of the sixty-six
bridges required for the construction of the Belt Parkway will be under
contract and 29 of the 30 miles of pavement will be under construction.

           To date forty-four contracts have been let since the project was
approved on October 13, 1938 for a total of $21,931,530 or 88% of the total
cost.

           The work under this contraot is to be completed on or
before April 20, 1940.

           The three low bidders were:

           Federal Construction Corporation           $418,530.50
           101 Park Avenue, N. Y. C.

           Mill Basin Asphalt Corporation              436,500.10
           5410 Avenue »UW, Brooklyn, N. Y.

           Boyer Construction Co., Inc.                437,000.00
           25 West 43 Street, N. Y. C.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 3, 1939


        The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
city wide checker tournament for the competitors in the 16 year age
group division will be replayed on Saturday, August 5th, at 2;00 P.M.
at Heckscher Playground, Central Park.

        This second playoff for the five borough Playground Checker
Championship is necessary because Milton Loew, who won the first playoff, was
officially declared an ineligible entrant. The rules governing Park
Department tournaments require that all participants possess an amateur
status.

        Murray Klein of 580 Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn, who represents Tompkins
Square Playground, and who was runner-up in the first tournament, will play
the winner of the Bronx for the championship.

        The Bronx representative will be determined at 2:00 P.M.  tomorrow
afternoon, Friday, August 4th, in an elimination to be conducted at Mullaly
Playground, 162nd Street and Jerome Avenue, Bronx, between the following
boys: Murray Ginsberg - Zimmerman Playground, Robert Siegel - Crotona Park
East Playground, Otto Echt - St. Mary's West Playground, and Joseph Davidson
- 183rd Street Playground, all of whom, as well as Klein, have been
investigated and certified as simon-pure amateurs.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 3, 1939


              The Park Department announces that organized groups of the
Guild for Jewish Blind will be permitted the use of the remodelled swimming
pool at 342 East 54th Street twice weekly, commencing Thursday, August 3, at
5 P.M.  The hours assigned to this group are 10 A.M.-12 noon on Tuesdays and
5-7 P.M. on Thursdays.

              Arrangements have been perfected with Leonard Wallstein, who is
sponsoring this new recreational movement for the sightless, whereby the
group will be accompanied by their own swimming instructors.

              Fifty-six have already registered for the use of this Park
Department facility.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 2, 1939


           Bids were opened by the Department of Parks at the Arsenal for the
construction of two bridges, at Flatbush Avenue and at Ocean Parkway on the
Shore Parkway section of the Belt Parkway system.

           Each bridge has two spans, the superstructure of which consists of
rolled structural steel beams, with a reinforced concrete deck. The approach
fills are retained by stone faced concrete walls with the entire structures
supported on concrete filled steel pipe piles.

           To date forty-three contracts have been let for the construction
of the Belt Parkway system, since the project was approved on October 13,
1938 for a total of $21,513,000 or 85% of the total cost.

           The work under this contract is to be completed on or before April
20, 1940.

           The three low bidders were:

           Elmhurst Contracting Company             $455,033.50
           53-04 97th Place
           Corona, Long Island

           Federal Construction Corporation          460,136.15
           101 Park Avenue, N. Y. C.

           Melwood Construction Corporation          469,845.35
           507 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 27, 1939


           The Department of Parks announces that the finals
of the Chess and Checker Tournament w i l l be held at Heckscher
Playground, Central Park, on Satruday, July 29th, a t 11 A.M.

           There will be four age groups in the Checker Contests

           Children up to 16 years

           Persons    16 - 25 years

           Persons    25 - 50 years

           Persons    50 years and over

           There will be two divisions in the Chess Tournament:

           Persons    14 - 25 years

           Persons over 25 years

           Borough eliminations have been held in each of the five boroughs
during the month of July.  The winners will represent the boroughs at the
finals on Saturday.

           In the Checker Tournament children in the first age group (up t o
16 years) are to report at 11 AtM. All other contestants, both Chess and
Checkers, report at 1 P.M.

           Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to the first,
second and third place winners respectively.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 27, 1939


                  The Department of Parks announces that free public outdoor
social dancing, which at the present time is being conducted in eleven areas
throughout the park system, will be inaugurated in Riverside Park at 105
Street, Manhattan, at 8:30 P.M. starting on July 28 and continuing every
Friday evening thereafter.

                  The dance floor is on one of the special areas, overlooking
the Henry Hudson Parkway and the Hudson River, constructed in connection with
the development of the West Side Improvement to provide increased
recreational facilities for the people of the West Side. Aside from dancing,
here, one may sit and enjoy the cool breezes sweeping in from the River and
also view the famed escarpment of the Palisades.

                  Entrances to the dancing area are at West 103 Street and
West 108 Street and Riverside Drive.

                  Music will be provided by the WPA Federal Music Project.

                  All persons over 18 years of age are invited to attend.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 26, 1939


                  The Department of Parks announces that the portion of last
River Park from Grand Street to East 12 Street, Manhattan, will be officially
opened on Thursday, July 27, at 12 o'clock noon.

                  Mayor La Guardia will be the principal speaker.  Besides
the Mayor, Samuel Levy, former President of the Borough of Manhattan, Stanley
M. Isaacs, present President of the Borough of Manhattan, and Joseph
D. McGoldrick, Comptroller of the City of New York, will speak. Robert Moses,
Commissioner of Parks, will preside.

                  As part of the general scheme of the East River Drive
Improvement which is a vital section of New York's Belt Parkway system, the
Manhattan Borough President's office and the Park Department have jointly
worked out plans for this new waterfront park similar to the West Side
development with the work being performed under the direction of the Borough
President's office.

                  The Borough President of Manhattan has recently taken bids
for the demolition of buildings which must be removed in the southerly
extension of this park. The construction of this section of the park will
progress as rapidly as contracts can be let. As soon as the bulkhead
construction and rough grading can be completed by the Borough President, the
Park Department will let contracts for the completion of the southerly
portion of this park, which will tie the existing Corlears Hook Park to the
East River Park which is being opened today.  This new park development when
complete will be adjacent to the new low cost housing development now being
built on the Lower East Side and will provide the recreation required by the
people in this development.

             East River Park, extending from Montgomery Street and swinging
around Corlears Hook northward to East 12 Street, transforms a congested slum
area and bedraggled waterfront into a modern recreational center.  By
extending out the bulkhead lines and reclaiming land, 49.6 acres of
waterfront park have been provided, 36 acres of which are in the unit to be
opened on Thursday.

             In the new area, most of which has been set aside for active
recreation, are batteries of tennis courts; wading pools; football, baseball,
field hockey, Softball and soccer fields; volley ball, bocci, basketball,
handball, shuffleboard, hand tennis, paddle tennis and horseshoe pitching
courts.  There is a dancing and roller skating area, which, when sub-freezing
temperatures permit during winter months, will become an area for
ice-skating.  There is also a running track and a smaller children's
completely equipped play area.  The improvement includes a bandstand and four
recreation buildings with comfort stations to care for the needs of the users
of the park.  All these recreational facilities fit into a general landscape
scheme with wide promenades, rows of trees and benches.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


                         OPENING OF EAST RIVER PARK

                    East River Drive, Grand to 12 Streets

                                July 27, 1939

                                   12 Noon




    Band Selections

    Honorable Robert Moses, Commissioner, Department of Parks

              - Chairman

    Honorable Samuel Levy, former President, Borough Of Manhattan

    Honorable Stanley M. Isaacs, President, Borough Of Manhattan

    Honorable Joseph D. McGoldrick, Comptroller of the City of
                                    New York

    Honorable Fiorello H. La Guardia,
              - Mayor of the City of New York

    National Anthem

    Recreational Acttivities

    Band Selections


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 25, 1939

                  Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for the construction of the bridge over Paerdegat Basin, adjoining
Jamaica Bay.

                  The bridge, a part of the Belt Parkway system, is a
thirteen span structure, 664 feet in length.  The steel superstructure will
be supported on reinforced concrete pile bents.

                  The structure will provide for a clear channel width of 66
feet at Paerdegat Basin, and a vertical clearance of 28 feet above mean high
water.

                  To date 42 contracts for the construction of the Belt
Parkway have been let since the project was approved on October 13, 1938, for
a total of $21,058,909, or 84% of the estimated total cost of which the
Federal Emergency Public Works Administration supplied a grant of
$12,000,000, the balance being appropriated by the City.

                  The three low bidders were:

                  P. J . Carlin Construction Co.          $397,611.00
                  405 Lexington Avenue, N. Y. C

                  0'Day Construction Co., Inc.             399,704.00
                  15 East 47th Street, N. Y. C.

                  George F. Driscoll Co.                   403,609.75
                  550 Union Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 19, 1939


             The Department of Parks announces that a ship bulletin board,
which gives the schedule of the arrival and departure of passenger vessels in
New York harbor so that citizens and visitors will know what marine activity
is taking place, was dedicated and unveiled on Wednesday, July 19, at 12:15
P.M. in Battery Park, Manhattan.

             Mayor La Guardia was the principal speaker.  Eugene Moran, Sr.,
Chairman of the River and Harbor Committee, Marine Association, Inc., acted
as Chairman, Joseph Hamper, Chairman of Trans-Atlantic Passenger Conference,
Inc., Frank J.. Taylor, President of American Merchant Marine Institute,
Hon. John McKenzie, Commissioner of Docks, John D. Reilly, President of Todd
Shipyards, Inc., and Allyn R. Jennings, General Superintendent of the
Department of Parks, also participated in the speaking part of the program.

             Mary Agnes Reilly, daughter of John D. Reilly, unveiled the Board.

             The Board, made of Redwood, is 19 feet wide and 14 feet high.
It is specially constructed to allow for ten large slides (2'9" long and
9˝" high) bearing the names, distinguishing colors and marks of passenger
vessels.  The name plates are set five in each of two panels, divided by a
map showing the location of the piers and the Upper and Lower Bays.

             The steamship lines which have provided the Park Department with
slides are:

American Export Lines                Moore-McCormack .Lines, Inc.
Anchor Line                          New York and Cuba Mail Steamship Co.
Clyde-Mailory Lines                  New York and Porto Rico Steamship Co.
Cunard White Star Limited            North German Lloyd
Eastern Steamship Lines, Inc.        Norwegian-American Line
French Line                          Panama Pacific Line
Furness Group                        Panama Railroad Company
Gdynia-American Line                 Swedish American Line
The Grace Line, Inc.                 Trans-Atlantic Passenger Conference,Inc.
Hamburg-American Line                United Fruit Company
Holland-American Line                United States Line
Italian Line

             A similar board has been erected on the Narrows in Fort Hamilton
Park, Brooklyn.

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                    Remarks by John D. Reilly, President, Todd
                    Shipyards, Inc., at Dedication Exercises of
                    Ship Bulletin Board, Battery Park, July 19,1939

Mr. Mayor, Mr. Moran, Ladies and Gentlemen:

          Far from thanking me for this small gift to the city of which I am
proud to be a part, I want to thank you for the privilege of being allowed to
assist you in putting before our fellow citizens another reason for
appreciating the wonders of our great city.

          Primarily, New York City is a friendly city, and friendship is
based on knowing all about each other. Naturally, my main interest lies in
shipping and things maritime. Equally, naturally, I want to make friends for
this gigantic industry.

          Many times I have strolled the Battery sea wall and listened to
hundrreds of both visitors and residents puzzling over what this or that
vessel happened to be that was passing by.

          I felt that if these persons so interested could be brought in
close contact with our never ceasing harbor doings there might develop a
greater bond based on knowledge of just how important to their daily
existence these doings are.

          There is hardly one of us not affected by the arrival and departure
of a vessel from New York harbor - be it a coastal steamer or a
round-the-world-cruise ship.

          Every port of the world is linked with New York harbor. Each port
represents people - and if my gift can help to further friendship between these
peoples and our own vast shipping industry then I shall be happy.

          In this sense these Bulletin Boards are much more than wood and
enamel slides - they act as a bridge between the thoughts of us here and our
friends in foreign lands.

          As you are aware, Mr. Mayor, I am not alone in the furnishing of
these boards. There are those from whom the idea was evolved, sponsored and
brought to fruition. To each of them I tender my thanks for all their efforts
to enable me to do something to foster your program of making New Yorkers and
visitors alike "Proud of our great City."

                                         Thank you.

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                    Remarks by Joseph Mayper, Chairman, Trans-Atlantic
                    Passenger Conference, Inc., at Dedication Exercises
                    of Ship Bulletin Board, Battery Park, July 19, 1939

Mr, Mayor, Mr. Moran, Ladies and Gentlemen:

          The trans-Atlantic passenger steamship Lines are happy to cooperate
with the City's Park Department in the new service to the public now made
available through the medium of this beautiful Ship Bulletin Board.

          Blessed by one of the finest of harbors, the Port of Neitf York is
probably the largest, most frequently used and best known port in the
world. In a single year, if all forms of steamship transportation are
included, the traffic out of this port consists of over 6,000 sailings in the
foreign trade to the four corners of the world and over 7,500 sailings in the
intercoastal and coastwise trades. The economic life of the City of New York,
and for that matter of the country as a whole, would be stifled, if not
strangled, if this water traffic were suddenly cut off.

          For that reason, as well as because of the romantic appeal the sea
and everything connected with it has always had for the normal human being,
it was a happy thought to erect this Bulletin Board for the information not
only of New Yorkers, but also of the thousands of visitors from the interior
of the country.

            It is a far cry from the first all steam-propelled ship that
crossed the Atlantic a century ago to the modern liner. The little wooden
paddle-wheeler "Sirius" which arrived here from Cork in April, 1838, was 178
feet long, of 703 gross tons and of 320 horsepower. Compare it with a ship
that will steam by this Board within the next hour -- a ship nearly 6 times
as long, 112 times its gross tonnage and 600 times its horsepower!

          It took Columbus 70 days to cross from Spain to the West Indies-now
you can cross the Atlantic on any one of a number of comfortable ships in from
5 to 8 days!

          Safety, comfort and speed are the watchwords in ocean
transportation. .  A modern passenger ship is probably the most complicated
work that man has achieved. It operates with clocklike regularity. It may be
as tall as the Empire State Building, but must be as mobile as an automobile;
it must have the power of many thousands of horses, but be free from even the
suggestion of a squeak or a rattle; it must have every automatic safety
device that human ingenuity can create, but be eternally watched and checked
by the human mind, eye, ear and hand; and it must have every facility and
luxury of a great hotel and provide for nearly every aspect of community
life.

             In the belief that the public is interested in knowing which of
these marvels of modern mechanical development are sailing by this point from
day to day and from hour to hour, the trans-Atlantic passenger Linos deem it
a privilege to cooperate with the City of New York and other shipping
interests in making this information available.

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                                   PROGRAM
                                      
                      DEDICATION OF SHIP BULLETIN BOARD

                               at Battery Park

                          Wednesday, July 19, 1939

                                 12:15 P.M.

Band Selections

Eugene Moran, Sr., Chairman, River and Harbor Committee,
                                     Maritime Association, Inc.

                      - Chairman

Joseph Mayper, Chairman, Trans-Atlantic Passenger Conference, Inc.

Frank J . Taylor, President, American Merchant Marine Institute

Honorable John McKenzie, Commissioner of Docks

John D. Reilly, Todd Shipyards, Inc., Donor of Board

Allyn R. Jennings, General Superintendent, Department of Parks

Honorable Fiorello H. La Guardia,

                       - Mayor of the City of New York

Unveiling of Board by Mary Agnes Reilly

National Anthem

Fireboat Display

Band Selections

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Lead.
July 19, 1939
Dedication of Ships Bulletin Board

                         In commending the inspiration of the thought
relative to the erection of the Ships' Bulletin Board which will indicate the
flag and company under which the large liners enter the Port of New York from
all over the world, Frank J. Taylor, president of the American Merchant
Marine Institute, Inc., at the dedication of the Ships' Bulletin Board at
Battery Park here today, stated that acclamation and congratulations are due
our Commissioner Moses for his interest and his carrying out of the plans for
this Bulletin Board, and to John D. Reilly, president of the Todd Shipyards
Corporation, for his patriotic and serviceable donation of this Ships'
Bulletin Board.

                         Mr. Taylor called attention to the progress by
governmental officials and the maritime industry of America in building up an
adequate and efficient merchant marine.  Pointing out the low status of
American-flag ships in world trade at the time of the World War, when only
about 16 large vessels were in world trade and carrying less than 10 per cent
of our commerce, he said, "that situation taught us the lesson that we must
never again be similarly unprepared for such an emergency and Congress, on
three occasions, has undertaken to provide the means whereby an adequate
American merchant marine might be created, and absolute success is attending
this huge venture, by the Merchant Marine Act of 1936.  The United States
Maritime Commission and the shipping industry are cooperating 100 per cent."

                          He further pointed out that the international
situation of today and the amazing development of ocean transportation in the
past 20 years have had the effect of making us realize as never before that
the United States must be regarded as a major marine nation.

                          "Sixty good size cities are located on 7000 miles
of coast-line in the United States and an adequate merchant marine as an
auxiliary to the national defense will, of necessity, mean much to a nation
thus exposed," Mr.  Taylor concluded.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 19, 1939

                     The Department of Parks, in an effort to interest
individuals and groups to plant trees and thereby improve the appearance of
their locality, requested various cemeteries within the city limits to
cooperate in replanting their areas, particularly those portions bordering on
city streets.

                     The necessity for these improvements were brought to
light by the appearance of the various cemeteries in the five boroughs
because of the devel- opment of the City's arterial system of
through-streets, boulevards and parkways during the past few years, some of
which necessitated the taking of cemetery land, and others of which parallel
cemeteries.

                     The initial suggestion met with a prompt response and
cooperation on the part of metropolitan cemetery authorities, to such an
extent that a letter from Commissioner Moses to Mr.  Roland Schultheis,
Secretary-Treasurer of the Association of Cemetery Officials of the
Metropolitan District of New York City and President of the New York State
Association of Cemeteries, Inc., was read at the opening meeting of the state
wide convention, now in session at the Hotel Roosevelt.

                     The letter is as follows:

                                                      "July 14, 1939

Mr. Roland Schultheis, President
New York State Association of Cemeteries, Inc.
Flushing Cemetery
Flushing, N. Y.

Dear Mr. Schultheis;

         Mr. Jennings told me of the conference he has had with you and your
organization. It is most unusual and gratifying to meet with such unanimous
approval and spirit of cooperation from an organization of your scope on a
somewhat gratuitous suggestion, which may result in unexpected expense to some
of your members and in which the City is restricted by law to a comparatively
limited contribution in any form.

         During the past five years the Park Department has done considerable
to improve the appearance of the City in development, improvement, and better
maintenance of parks, both new and old, and in the planting and improved care
of trees on some of the City's major thoroughfares.  We have also promoted
planting of trees on residential streets by adjacent property owners where no
City funds were available. This has been worked out not only with individual
property ovraers, but in some cases with large groups covering many
blocks. This new work is just beginning to make a noticeable showing and as
time goes on and the young trees approach maturity the appearance of the City
will be vastly improved.

         Some of the City's cemeteries are already improved in accordance
with recognized landscape standards and are a credit to the community from
the standpoint of appearance. With the vast acreages of cemeteries,
particularly in Queens, Brooklyn and The Bronx, it is important to the City
as a whole that they be made as attractive as possible. My suggestion to your
organization was made with this end in view. The City is prepared to do
everything within its financial and legal limits to help in the embellishment
of the streets bordering cemeteries where the owners make a reasonable
attempt to improve the appearance of the interior of the cemetery as viewed
from the outside. The spirit of cooperation already evinced by your
association indicates that this end will be reached in the not too distant
future.

         I take this opportunity of thanking you for your cooperation and
effort and of renewing the City's offer to reciprocate in every way possible.

                                                     Cordially,

                                                     Robert Moses

                                                     Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 17, 1939


                       On Wednesday, July 19, at IS:15 P.M. in Battery Park,
the Department of Parks in cooperation with shipping interests will dedicate
a bulletin board which will give the schedule of the arrival and departure of
passenger vessels in New York harbor so that citizens and visitors will know
what marine activity is taking place.

                       Besides Mayor La Guardia who will be the principal
speaker, other city officials and representatives of maritime interests will
also participate. Most of the steamship lines have already indicated that
representatives will attend the ceremonies.

                       A detachment of sailors from the Brooklyn Wavy Yard
will participate and fireboats standing off-shore will put on a water display
at the time of the actual unveiling,

                       A similar board will be placed in use in Fort Hamilton
Park on the Narrows at the same time.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 14, 1939


                The Park Department announces that the city-wide finals
of the Horseshoe Pitching Tournament will be held at Heckscher Playgroundk
Central Park, on Saturday, July 15, at 2:00 P.M.

                Eliminations wore held, in each of the five boroughs for men
and boys over 16 years of age during the past month. The winner and runner up
in both the singles and doubles division will compete on Saturday for the
City Championship,

                In addition to the gold, silver and bronze medals to be
awarded the winners of the finals, an athletic shirt and emblem will be
awarded to the first place winner in each division.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 14, 1939


              The Department of Parks announced today that in order to
attract an additional number of motorists to the World's Fair and to increase
the patronage at the New York City Parking Field, beginning Saturday, July
15th, the parking fee at the City Parking Field will be reduced from fifty
cents to twenty-five cents.

              This field was built and is operated by the City and will
accommodate 11,000 cars at one time. It has a direct connection to the main
exhibit area of the Fair by means of the pedestrian bridge over Roosevelt
Avenue and the Long Island Railroad.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 14, 1939


                      The Department of Parks announces that celebrations
will take place in various playgrounds during the month of July in
commemoration of their official opening to the public.

                      These playground birthday parties will feature athletic
meets for boys and girls which will include dashes, high jumping and novelty
events such as egg and spoon races, potato races, three-legged races and
wheelbarrow races; also recitations, one-act plays and dance exhibitions
comprising popular children's dances.

                      Wading pools in these recreation areas will likewise be
the scene of joyous splashes in the form of well known water sports and
tournaments for kindergarten children.

                      Where the facilities permit, Softball games will be
included in the playground schedule of anniversary festivities.

                      Prominent local citizens have been invited to address
the children on the advantages, both physical and mental, afforded them by
playgrounds; and also the necessity of exercising care in the use of the
equipment to prevent any unnecessary destruction of park property, which is
maintained primarily for their enjoyment at great cost to the city.

                      The July schedule for playground anniversary
celebrations is as follows:

Borough      Playground                                          Date Opened

Manhattan    Sauer Playground, last 12th Street and Aveiue A     July 15, 1934
             McCray Playground, W.158 Street and Lenox Ave.      July 15, 1934
             148 Street and Riverside Drive Playground           July 34, 1938
             St. Gabriel's Playground, 35 Street and 1st Ave.    July 31, 1936

Bronx        Zimmerman Playground,Barker Ave.to Olinville Ave.   July 15, 1934
             Ciccarone Playground, E. 188 St. and Hughes Ave.    July 15, 1934

Queens       O'Connell Playground, 196 St. and 113 Ave. .St.Albans July 15,'34
             Von Dohlen Playground, 138 St. and Archer Ave.,Jam.   July 15,f34
             Jackson Heights Playground, 84 St. and 25 Ave.        July 15,'34
             Windmuller Playground, 52 Street and Uoodside Ave.    July 30,'37

Richmond     McDonald Playground, Forest and Myrtle Avenues      July 15, 1934
             De Matti Playground, Tompkins Ave., Chestnut
                                       and Shaughnessy Lane      July 15, 1934
             Crescent Avenue Playground, Crescent Ave. and
                                           Cleveland Street      July 25, 1937

Brooklyn     Sheridan Playground, Grand St. nr. Wythe Ave.       July 15, 1934
             Lafayette and Reid Avenue Playground                July 25, 1937
             Pitkin and New Jersey Avenues                       July 30, 1937
             Howard and Pacific Street                           July 30, 1937
             McKibbin Playground, McKibbin and White Streets     July 31, 1936

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 14, 1939


             Through the joint cooperation of Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia,
John S, Burke, of the Friedsam Foundation, and Local 802, A. F. of M., a
series of fifteen band concerts will be inaugurated on Tuesday evening, July
18th, 8:30 P.M. at the Sarah Delano Roosevelt Playground, Canal to Houston,
Chrystie to Forsyth Streets, New York City, This playground can be reached on
the Eighth Avenue subway to Second Avenue station.

             This series, to be given during the summer of 1939, will be
held at the various municipal pools and recreational centers of New York.
A similar series of concerts was given last summer. These concerts
proved a tremendous success. Many thousands of underprivileged citizens
of New York City were afforded an opportunity to enjoy them.

             Don Vorhees, famous NBC radio conductor will conduct the first
concert. He is at present conducting the Sunday Ford Symphony Hour which
lists amongst its famous directors such names as John Barbirolli, Jose
Iturbi, Fritz Reiner and Erno Rapee.

             Marjorie Livingston, dramatic soprano, will render a number of
solos. She is a young artist and has appeared in concerts on the radio and
with the Chicago City Opera.

             The remainder, of the schedule follows:

    Location of Concerts                   Date of Concerts
                         
Red Hook Recreation Center               Thursday evening 8:30 P.M., July 20th
Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets, Brooklyn 

Van Cortlandt Park Recreation Center     Tuesday evening 8:30 P.M., July 25th
West 242 Street & Broadway, Bronx

Astoria Play Center                      Thursday evening 8:30 P.M., July 27th
Barclay Street & 24th Drive, Queens

Highbridge Play Center                   Tuesday evening 8:30 P.M., August 1st
Amsterdam Avenue & 173rd St., Manhattan

McCarren Play Center                     Thursday evening 8:30 P.M., August 3rd
Nassau Avenue & Lorimer Street, Brooklyn 

Crotona Play Center                      Tuesday evening 8:30 P.M., August 8th
173rd Street & Fulton Avenue, Bronx

Jacob Riis Park                          Thursday evening 8:30 PM, August 10th
Jamaica Bay, Atlantic Ocean, Beach
149th to 169th Street, Neponsit, Queens

Franklin Delano Boardwalk                Sunday afternoon 3:30 PM, August 13th
Fort Wadsworth to Liberty Avenue
South Beach, Richmond

Colonial Park                            Wednesday-evening 8:30, August 16th
Bradhurst Ave, 145th to 147th Streets, Manhattan

Sunset Play Center                       Thursday evening 8:30, August 17th
7th Ave. & 43 Street, Brooklyn

Macombs Dam Park                         Tuesday evening 8:30 P.M., August 22nd
164th Street & Jerome Avenue, Bronx

Rockaway Beach                           Thursday evening 8:30 P.M.,August 24th
Beach 95th Street, Rockaway, N. Y.

Henry Hudson Parkway                     Tuesday evening 8:30 P.M.,August 29th
West 101 Street, Manhattan

Anawanda Park                            Thursday evening 8:30 P.M.,August 31st
Grandview Avenue & Stanhope Street, Queens

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                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


               The New York City Parkway Authority, of which Commissioner
Robert Moses is the sole member, today announced the opening of bids on
Contract No. 21, which calls for the construction of fender racks at the
Cross Bay Parkway viaduct in the Borough of Queens.

               The fender racks are being installed for the protection of
marine traffic and the piers at the bascule bridge, which is a part of the
viaduct structure.

               The three low bidders were:

1. Frederick Snare Corporation                  $    78,527.00

2. Charles F. Vachris                               106,275.00

3. J. Rich Steers                                   117,930.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 6, 1939


                     Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks at the
Arsenal for the construction»of the superstructure of the bascule bridge
to carry the Belt Parkway over Mill Basin, Brooklyn.

                     This bridge is 864 feet 6 inches long between abutments
and consists of a bascule-span, two flanking spans and seven approach-spans.

                     The bascule span provides a clear channel width of 131
feet at Mill Basin with an underelearance of thirty-five feet above mean high
water, with the span down.

                     The bridge carries two 34-foot roadways separated by a
center mall four feet in width and two six-foot sidewalks.  The roadways and
sidewalks are of concrete, except on the bascule span where the roadways are
of open grating and the walkways of timber. 
 
                     Work for the foundations and substructure of the bridge
has been let under a previous contract and is now under construction.


                     The three low bidders were:

1. Reiss & Weinsier                 $ 668.399.00
   105 Court Street, Brooklyn NY

2. George E. Driscoll                 675,799.00
   550 Union Street, Brooklyn NY

3. Arthur Gallow                      676,316.00
   260 E. 161st St, New York City

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              July 3, 1939


            The Department of Parks announces that well-rounded programs have
been prepared for the boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds in
commemoration of Independence Day, Tuesday, July 4th, at 2:00 P.M.

            Patriotism will be stressed in the fora of flag raising ceremonies,
singing of national anthem, and discourses by leading local citizens on the
significance of this day in the calendar of American Holidays.

            Many of the programs will feature athletic meets which will
include dashes, high jumping, broad jumping and novelty events such as egg
and spoon race, potato race, three legged race and wheelbarrow race; also
recitations and dance festivals comprising popular children1s dances, viz.,
Virginia Reel, Carousel, Hansel and Gretel, and Children's Polka.

            Where the facilities permit,, softball games will be included in
the playground schedule of activities on July 4th.

            Some of the recreational areas at which the celebrations will take
place are as follows:

Manhattan  Heckscher Children's Playground, Seward Park, Tompkins Square
           Park, Colonial Playground, Gulick Playground, Mt, Morris Playground
           and Ft. Tryon Playground.

Brooklyn   Red Hook Playground, City Park, Betsy Head Playground, Neptune
           Avenue and West 28th Street Playground and Leiv Eiriksson and
           McKinley Playgrounds and McCarren Park.

Queens     Jackson Pond, Rainey Park, Von Dohlen Playground, Highland
           Upper Playground, Liberty Park Playground and Corona 111th
           Playground and Cunningham Parkt

Bronx      Williamsbridge, Mullaly and Crotona East Playgrounds.

Richmond   Crescent Avenue Playground, Schmul Park Playground, Lincoln
           Avenue Playground, De Matti Playground, Kaltenmeier Playground
           and Mariner's Harbor Playground,


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 30, 1939


                  On Friday, June 30, the Department of Parks officially
opened to the public, the Marconi Memorial Field at 155 Street and 108
Avenue, South Jamaica) Queens, Mayor La Guardia was the principal speaker at
the ceremonies which took place at 3:30 P.M. Park Commissioner Moses
presided.  Besides, the Mayor, Councilman James A. Burke and Borough
President George U. Harvey participated.  After the speaking exercises, there
was a program of recreational acitivities.

                  This playground is located in one of the older, intensively
developed sections of South Jamaica with a large negro population, frame
buildings and narrow streets where there has been an insistent demand over a
period of years for recreational facilities, and it provides to some extent,
much needed recreational facilities for all age groups in a part of the City
that has long been neglected. A few blocks to the east is situated the Samuel
H. Huntington Junior High School with practically no school yard and this new
play area will temporarily care for the lack of play facilities at that
location.

                  The area runs from 108 to 109 Avenues and from 155 to 157
Streets.  156 Street from 108 to 109 Avenues has been closed so that the
playground adjoins Public School No. 48 on the east and south sides, and
provides play space for the school children not only after school hours, but
also during school recreation periods.

                  South of the school, the one block square area developed to
care for older children and adults has been provided with floodlights to
afford recreation after dark for those who have to work during daylight
hours.  Besides 12 shuffleboard, 12 paddle tennis, 6 horseshoe pitching and 8
handball courts, it also contains a large bituminous surfaced play area which
can be used not only for softball and other group games, but also can be
flooded for ice skating when sub-freezing temperatures permit.

                  The entire area is enclosed by fencing and a planted area
with shade trees. Numerous permanent benches have been placed throughout to
provide rest for guardians of children and those seeking rest.

                  The Department of Parks also announces that an agreement has
been reached granting the Park Department permission to occupy the Jamaica
Water Supply Company's property between 108 and 109 Avenues and 164 Place
and 167 Street, Jamaica, Queens.

                  Under the agreement the Park Department is permitted to
develop the property for recreational purposes for a period of ten years
providing it fences around all tanks and company structures within the area.

                  Plans for development of the area are already under way and
the work will be done by relief labor.

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