Kermit Security Reference

Authors:
Jeffrey Altman, Frank da Cruz
The Kermit Project, Columbia University

Applies To:
C-Kermit 8.1.206, 24 October 2002
Kermit 95 2.1.3, 1 January 2003
An earlier version of this document covers C-Kermit 7.0 and K95 1.1.17-20.

Most Recent Update:
Wed Jan 1 10:42:49 2003

Abstract:
Security methods explained: Kerberos, SSL/TLS, SRP, SSH. How to configure and use them with C-Kermit and Kermit 95.

[ Kermit Home ] [ C-Kermit ] [ Kermit 95 ]


CONTENTS

   1. INTRODUCTION
   2. DISCLAIMERS
   3. KERMIT SECURITY USER GUIDE
   4. INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION
   5. SCRIPTING AND AUTOMATION
   I. WHERE TO FIND SECURE TELNET AND FTP SERVERS
  II. MULTIHOMED HOSTS, FIREWALLS, NATS
 III. INTRODUCTION TO CERTIFICATES
  IV. USING OTHER SECURITY METHODS WITH KERMIT
      GLOSSARY   
      REFERENCES   
      TRADEMARKS


1. INTRODUCTION

[ Top ] [ Contents ] [ Glossary ] [ Next ]

CHAPTER CONTENTS

  1.1. Secure Connections
  1.2. Internet Protocols
  1.3. Authentication
  1.4. Encryption
  1.5. Integrity
SECURITY is the hot topic on the Internet. Security systems and protocols abound. But it was not always so. In the early days, the mere act of putting two computers in touch with each other was quite amazing. To connect multiple diverse computers to a common network, allowing any pair of them to communicate, was almost inconceivable. When the ARPANET (precursor of the Internet) was first operational on October 1, 1969, the eager task for many years afterwards was to open up more and more sites to it. The architecture of the network and its protocols were developed in research laboratories in an atmosphere of trust.

Only later, when the ARPANET became the world-wide Internet and was opened up to limitless numbers of people, did security become an issue: hackers, crackers, script kiddies, terrorists, spies, hucksters, swindlers, pornographers, saboteurs, blackmailers, pranksters, and pests of every sort inundate the network and every computer on it with a constant barrage of probes and attacks. It is increasingly necessary to secure connections from eavesdropping and malicious tampering (not to mention spam, worms,