Windows Internet Kermit Service - Administrator Guide

Max Evarts, The Kermit Project
Columbia University, New York City

[ Contents ] [ WIKSD User Guide ] [ Kermit 95 Home ] [ Kermit Home ]

ABSTRACT: How to install, configure, and manage the Windows Internet Kermit Service: a standards-compliant File Transfer and Management Shell for Windows NT, 2000, and XP from the Kermit Project at Columbia University, available in free and secure versions.

   As of Kermit 95 version: 2.0
   This file last updated: 4 June 2002   (New York City time)

IF YOU ARE READING A PLAIN-TEXT version of this document, it is a plain-text dump of a Web page. You can visit the original (and possibly more up-to-date) Web page here:

  http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/wiksdadmin.html

This document applies to Windows NT and its descendents, which at this writing include Windows 2000 and Windows XP. When the term "Windows", "Windows NT", or "Windows NT/2000" is used in this document it refers to Windows NT, 2000, and XP, but not to Windows 95, 98, or Millenium Edition (which are sometimes referred to collectively as Windows 9x or Win9x). The Internet Kermit Service should NOT be installed on Windows 9x because (a) Windows 9x is insecure, and (b) it does not support background processes or "services". Any references to Windows 9x in this document are for completeness only and should not be construed as encouragement for running an unattended Internet Kermit Service on those operating systems.

Comments, suggestions, questions welcome. Send them by email to: kermit-support@columbia.edu.


CONTENTS

  1. WHAT IS IKSD?
  2. INSTALLATION
  3. IKSD USERS
  4. RUNTIME CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
  5. ACCESS TO SERVICES
  6. MONITORING AND CONTROL  
  7. OPEN ISSUES
  8. TESTING


1. WHAT IS IKSD?

[ Top ] [ Contents ] [ Next ]

The Microsoft Windows operating system was not originally designed or intended to allow remote access by ordinary terminal programs (such as Telnet clients). Yet users understandably wanted this type of open access ever since Windows was first announced. As soon as Kermit 95 announced in October 1995 (just after Windows 95 itself), users began demanding support for incoming connections. The result was "Host Mode", which in effect built a user-ID based authentication and file system onto a Windows 95 foundation that didn't have such a thing.

Windows NT (which actually predates Windows 95 by a couple years, but did become popular until much later) solves many of the sam