Columbia MM
MM Manual

WRITING AND SENDING MESSAGES WITH MM

Sending mail actually consists of three logical steps. In MM, they are usually done in this order: addressing, writing the message, sending.


THE SEND ROUTINE IN MM

The standard procedure in MM is to type send at the MM> prompt, and fill in the address, subject and text. When you are done, you enter Send Mode, shown by the S> prompt.



MM>send
 To: fb2
 cc: mm33, hk12
 Subject: Meeting on Sept 21
 Message (End with CTRL/D or ESC
  Use CTRL/B to insert a file, CTRL/E to enter editor, CTRL/F to run text
  through a filter, CTRL/K to redisplay message, CTRL/L to clear screen and
  redisplay, CTRL/N to abort, CTRL/P to run a program and insert output.):

Let's meet on Sept 21 at 2:00 to go over plans for this semester.

Joe
[escape]

S>


There are two address fields, To and cc. You would generally use the To field to indicate who the message is for.

The cc field is based on the longstanding business practice of sending copies of memos or letters for information purposes. The origins of cc are debatable; it may be carbon copy or courtesy copy, or may be simply a plural of copy (like pp for pages). The cc field is used to show someone else what message you sent, but the message is basically addressed to the people in the To field.


ADDRESS ON THE COMMAND LINE

An alternative form of the send command is to put the address on the same line with the command. Doing so cuts out both the To and cc prompts of the standard procedure.



MM>send fb2
 Subject: Meeting on Sept 21
 Message (End with CTRL/D or ESC
  Use CTRL/B to insert a file, CTRL/E to enter editor, CTRL/F to run text
  through a filter, CTRL/K to redisplay message, CTRL/L to clear screen and
  redisplay, CTRL/N to abort, CTRL/P to run a program and insert output.):
...


This effect is controlled by a variable, prompt-rcpt-always, normally set to no: if you supply an address with the send command it doesn't ask for any other addresses. If you don't want to skip the other address prompts, type the command set prompt-rcpt-always yes and then the command save-init.


ABORTING

You can cut off the send procedure at almost any point by typing control-n. Once you reach the S> prompt, type the command quit to do the same thing. This is known as aborting, and the message, or as much of it as you typed, is thrown away. (Actually, it's still in memory, and you can type continue at the MM> prompt to go back, if you abort by accident.)

This shows control-n being used at the Subject prompt, but remember you can use control-n at any point in the procedure.



MM>send
 To: fb2
 cc: mm33, hk12
 Subject: Meeting on [control-n]
Abort? y
MM>


The question Abort? gives you a chance to stop it, in case you hit control-n by mistake; you can type n and continue writing the message.

The behavior of control-n is controlled by a variable, control-n-abort, which is usually se