NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS PRESS RELEASES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1937

http://home2.nyc.gov/html/records/pdf/govpub/41901937_press_releases.pdf

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Search Terms relevant to New Deal:

W.P.A.
W. P. A.
Works Progress Administrator
Works Progress Administration 

Other interesting search terms:

Bill Robinson

New Deal projects announced in this archive:

 3 Apr 1937  Queens      New field house, Crocheron Park, 33rd Ave & 215th Pl.
 3 Apr 1937  Queens      New recreation building, Newton Elmhurst section,
                           92nd St & 56th Ave 
 3 Apr 1937  Queens      New playground at 135th and Lincoln Streets
 3 Apr 1937  Brooklyn    Renovation of comfort station - play room building
                           at Red Hook playground, Pioneer & Richards Sts 
 3 Apr 1937  Brooklyn    New comfort station and play room, Union St btw Van
                           Brunt St & Hamilton Ave 
 3 Apr 1937  Manhattan   New recreation building in Jay Hood Wright Park,
                           Fort Washington Ave & 174th St. 
 9 Apr 1937  Bronx       New recreation building in St. James Park, Jerome
                           Ave & 191st St. 
17 Apr 1937  Queens      Redesign and reconstruction of Crocheron Park,
                           214th Pl & 35th Ave 
17 Apr 1937  Brooklyn    New recreation bldg, playground at New Utrecht Ave
                           & 70th St 
17 Apr 1937  Manhattan   Completion of comfort station in Stuyvesnt Park at
                           2nd Ave btw 15th & 17th St 
17 Apr 1937  Manhattan   New playground at 45th Street east of 10th Avenue
17 Apr 1937  Manhattan   New Rockefeller playground at 63rd Street and York
                           Avenue 
 7 May 1937  Manhattan   New playground on former Central Park Casino site
 7 May 1937  Manhattan   Demolition by WPA of Casino in Central Park in 1934
12 May 1937  (all)       Abandonment of 26 partially completed projects due
                           to WPA layoffs 
17 May 1937  Manhattan   New bronze sculptures in Central Park Zoo
25 May 1937  Queens      Reconstructed and expanded Jacob Riis Park
29 May 1937  (all)       Summer drama presentations by Federal Theater Group
12 Jun 1937  Manhattan   New playground at 5th Ave and 130th-131st Streets
12 Jun 1937  Brooklyn    New playground on Avenue L btw 17th and 18th Streets
12 Jun 1937  Brooklyn    New building in playground at Ave X and Bedford Ave
28 Jun 1937  Brooklyn    Rehabilitation of Fort Greene Park
17 Jul 1937  Manhattan   New building in Highbridge Park, 17rd St &
                           Amsterdam Ave. 
17 Jul 1937  Manhattan   New building in playground at 101st St, 2nd-3rd Ave
17 Jul 1937  Queens      New playground in St.Albans Park, Sayres Ave btw
                           172nd St & Merrick Blvd 
17 Jul 1937  Queens      New playground at 179th Place North of Jamaica Ave
24 Jul 1937  Queens      New parking lot in Astoria Park under Triborough
                           Bridge 
24 Jul 1937  Queens      New playground in St.Albans Park, 174th Pl & 112th Ave
24 Jul 1937  Queens      New playground in N.Jamaica, 173rd St & 106th Ave
28 Jul 1937  Brooklyn    New playground at Pitkin and NJ Aves
28 Jul 1937  Brooklyn    New playground at Howard, Pacific, and Dean Streets
28 Jul 1937  Brooklyn    New playground at Lafayette and Reid Avenues
17 Aug 1937  Queens      Dredging and boat Basin in Flushing Meadow park
10 Sep 1937  Queens      New playground at 30th Road btw 45th-46th Streets
10 Sep 1937  Bronx       Williamsbridge Reservoir Playground
17 Sep 1937  Manhattan   The Conservatory Gardens in Central Park, 105th St
                           & Fifth Ave. 
11 Oct 1937  Manhattan   Riverside Park
15 Oct 1937  Manhattan   New playground on Randall's Island by cafeteria
                           building 
15 Oct 1937  Queens      New playground on Liberty Ave btw 172nd-173rd St
15 Oct 1937  Manhattan   New playground in Colonial Park in Harlem on
                           Bradhurst Ave, 148th-150th St 
26 Oct 1937  Manhattan   Remodeled playground, Madison Ave, 120-124th St in
                           Mount Morris Park 
26 Oct 1937  Manhattan   Remodeled playground at 2nd Ave & E.17th St in
                           Stuyvesant Park 
26 Oct 1937  Queens      New playground at 43rd St btw Greenpoint & 47th Aves
30 Oct 1937  Brooklyn    New playground at Dahill Road and 38th Street 
13 Nov 1937  Brooklyn    New playground, Powell & Sackman Sts,
                           Glenmore-Pitkin Aves. 
13 Nov 1937  Brooklyn    New playground at South 3rd and Berry Streets
27 Nov 1937  Manhattan   New playground on Harlem River, 150th-154th Street
27 Nov 1937  Manhattan   New playground in Chelsea Park, 9th Ave, 27-28 St
                           on roof of health center 
27 Nov 1937  Queens      New playground in Brookville Park, Brookville &
                           Weller Aves 
11 Dec 1937  Bronx       Hutchinson River Parkway Extension from Boston Road
                           to Pelham Bridge Road 
18 Dec 1937  Queens      New playground at 90th St btw 88th-89th Aves

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1/7/37   - 553 - One-millionth visitor to the 11 new play centers, entered
                 1/4/37.
                 
1/19/37  - 559 - Bid received for Horace Harding Blvd. Bridge over Flushing
                 River and for a boat basin bulkhead en Flushing Bay in
                 Flushing Meadows Park. 

1/29/37  - 540 - First part of Gorman Memorial Park will be opened to public
                 1/29/37 

2/2/37   - 541 - Bids received in Albany for completion of bridges and
                 roadways on Henry Hudson Parkway bet. 259 and 255rd sts. in
                 Riverdale Section.
                 
2/4/37   - 542 - Bids received in Albany (4) for the construc. of a bridge
                 to carry 69th Road over the Flushing River in Flushing
                 Meadow Park. 
                 
2/15/37  - 543 - Plans for Bronx-Whitestone Bridge project.

2/24/37  - 544 - Bids opened on contract for moving,stockpiling and processing
                 topsail material in Flushing meadow park on 2/24/37.
                 
2/25/37  - 545 - Completion of redesign and reconstruction of St.Gabriel's 
                 and reopened on 2/25/37.

3/20/37  - 546 - Completion of boat repair shop at Randall's Island for
                 Police Dept.  Also reopen playground in Corlears Hook Pk.,
                 recreation bldg. at Carmine & Downing Sts., new playground
                 at Liberty Ave. & 102nd St., Queens and new recreation
                 bldg. in Raymond O'Connor Pk., Queens. 

3/20/37  - 547 - Announcement that applications for Golf & Tennis Permits
                 will be received. 
                 
3/22/37  - 548 - 1,000,000 car using Henry Hudson Pkway. Construction of new
                 upper level of bridge. Bondholders asked to consent to new
                 issue of $2,000,000. (With Picture)

3/31/37  - 549 - Comm. Moses requests Series A Bondholders 3,100,000 to
                 grant consent to issuance of $2,000,000 Series B Bonds in
                 order to build upper level to Henry Hudson Bridge over
                 Spuyten Duyvil (Picture) 
                 
4/3/37   - 550 - Completion of alterations on Tavern-On-The Green &
                 Claremont Inn. Recreation Bldg. in Jay Hood Wright Pk.,
                 Man. in Bklyn., at Union St., Bet. Tan Brunt St. & Hamilton
                 Ave., in Queens at 135th. & Lincoln Sts. also at 92nd St. &
                 56th Ave. and at Crocheron Pk.

4/11/37  - 551 - Karl H. Gruppe engaged to reproduce original design of
                 statue of Henry Hudson to be placed at Spuyten Duyvil,
                 opposite 227th St. Also acquisition of lend to form
                 Memorial Park to Bernard S. Deutsch.   (Picture)

4/9/37   - 552 - Bids opened for contract for test borings to be made along
                 the shore of Flushing Bay. Names of bidders & figures
                 submitted, also engineer's estimate.
                 
4/9/37   - 553 - Opening of recreation bldg. in St. James Pk. (X-44).

14/18/37 - 554 - Erection of stainless steel statues at Astoria Swimming Pool.

4/14/37  - 555 - West Side Improvement will be completed next fall. Lift
                 bridge over Jamaica Inlet, connecting Bklyn. & Queens will
                 be opened in summer. 

4/15/37  - 556 - Parks Department announces the opening of nine of the ten
                 municipal golf courses. 
                 
4/l6/37  - 557 - Marine Parkway Authority announces the taking of estimates
                 for grading and paving of Jacob Riis Park.
                 
4/17/37  - 558 - Opening of playgrounds -- Brooklyn, New Utrecht Avenue &
                 70th Street -- Queens, Crocheron Park. Also of remodeled
                 parks -- Rockefeller Playground, 63rd Street & York
                 Avenue. At West 45th Street, Manhattan, new
                 playground. Stuyvesant Park, Second Avenue between 15th &
                 17th Streets, rehabilitated. Pictures. 

4/19/38  - 559 - Closing of play centers for cleaning in preparation of new
                 season. Swimming pools to reopen at 10 a. m. Saturday, May
                 29th. Figures for winter use of play spaces.  

4/20/37  - 560 - Hearing before Committee of U. S. Senate on Commerce,
                 Wednesday morning, 10:30, In capitol for authorization of
                 2,500,000 for improvements to Flushing Bay. 

4/20/37  - 561 - Bids for paving and trolley track relocation of main artery
                 crossing Flushing Meadows Park along Horace Harding Blvd.

4/23/37  - 562 - Postponement of Split Rock Golf Course opening.
                 
4/27/37  - 563 - Bids opened in Albany by State Dept. for paving Hutchinson
                 River Parkway extension in-Pelham Bay Park.Dept of Plants &
                 Structures will let contracts for widening Eastchester
                 Creek Bridge.
                 
4/28/37  - 564 - Announcement of second annual opportunity contest for
                 amateur musicians.  
                 
4/29/37  - 565 - Split Rock Golf Course opened to public Saturday, May 1st.

4/30/37  - 566 - Announcement that Tavern-cn-the-Green and Claremont
                 Restaurant will reopen May 1st. Pictures. 
                 
4/30/37  - 567 - Opening of new playground & two remodeled park buildings on
                 May 1st: Playground, part of Brooklyn Bridge Plaza
                 development. Buildings -- one 4n Clove Lakes Park and one
                 in La Tourette. Pictures.

5/2/37   - 568 - Tulip beds throughout city -- Pelham Parkway, Mt. Eden
                 Avenue, Van Cortlandt Park, etc.
                 
5/1/37   - 569 - Students from College of Architecture, Cornell University,
                 visit Central Park, West Side Improvement, Triborough
                 Bridge, etc. to study landscaped properties.
                 
15/3/37  - 570 - Per diem employes to be paid in full on rainy days. Open
                 letter over commissioner's signature on this and
                 arrangement for seasonal employes on revenue producing
                 facilities.

5/7/37   - 571 - Opening of Mary Harriman Rumsey Playground, Central Park,
                 Friday, May 7th. Pictures. 

5/7/37   - 572 - Correspondence between Col. Somervell and Commissioner
                 Moses with regard to WPA lay-offs. 
                 
5/7/37   - 573 - Planting of trees and shrubs throughout city parks and
                 parkways. 

5/10/37  - 574 - Bids for grading and paving roads and parking spaces on
                 Randall's Island together with incidental drainage
                 structures, topsoiling, irrigation and fencing.
                 
5/11/37  - 575 - Bids opened in Albany by State Dept. for paving Lawrence
                 Street, Rodman Street, & Horace Harding Blvd. General
                 development plan for Flushing Meadow Park & & marginal
                 roads. 

5/12/37  - 576 - Closing 142 playgrounds due to layoff of 429 WPA play
                 leaders. Civil service personnel will be assigned. 

5/12/37  - 577 - Marine Parkway Authority bids for grading Rockaway Inlet
                 Shore and bulkheading. Pictures.
                 
5/17/37  - 578 - Erection of two bronze figures, Central Park Zoo Concession
                 Restaurant. Dancing Bear and Dancing Goat.

5/24/37  - 579 - Letter from Commissioner Moses to Jeremiah Maguire about
                 pollution of city waters. List of facilities of public
                 recreational advantages.

5/25/37  - 580 - Last section of new bridge spanning Jamaica Inlet,
                 connecting Brooklyn & Queens was placed May 24th.  Jacob
                 Riis Park will be opened June 23rd.  Bathhouse facilities
                 10,000.  Parking facilities for 14,000.

5/25/37  - 581 - Bids for New York City building in Flushing Meadow
                 Park. Building to be converted to indoor recreational usage
                 in permanent park layout. 

5/29/37  - 582 - First Naumbwg takes place on Memorial Day, May 30th,
                 Central Park Mall. Program.

5/27/37  - 583 - Reopening 12 swimming pools, May 29th, 10 a. m. Eleven
                 opened last year, twelfth opened in Faber Park, Richmond,
                 was opened five years. Pools listed. 

5/27/34  - 584 - Children's garden at Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn sowed
                 first seeds in garden plots. 

5/27/37  - 585 - Letter to Allyn R. Jennings from H. L. Peckham, also
                 Colonel Somervell, from Robert Moses, in reference to a
                 5,000 reduction in personnel. 

5/29/37  - 586 - Schedule of dramas, concerts and dancing in borough parks.

6/3/37   - 587 - Change of schedule in time.for twelve outdoor swimming pools.

6/12/37  - 588 - Opening of playground, Fifth Avenue between 130th and 131st
                 Streets, Manhattan. In Brooklyn at Avenue "L".between East
                 17th and East 18th.   Pictures.

6/7/37   - 589 - Letter to Board of Estimate from Commissioner Moses in
                 reference to West Side Improvement, also schedule for
                 additional work. 

6/8/37  - 589A - Towers of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge - proposals for
                 construction. Bids to be opened June 23rd. Bids for
                 construction of the tower piers and anchorage foundations
                 were opened on June 8th. 

6/12/37  - 590 - Letter from Moses to Somervell and Somervell to Moses, re
                 working eight men eight hours overtime at Randall's
                 Island. 

6/16/37  - 591 - Opening of new beaches at Jacob Riis and Orchard Beach,
                 Friday, June 25th.

6/18/37  - 592 - Finals of second annual musical instrument contest on the
                 Mall, June 49th, 2:30.

6/l9/37  - 593 - Short resume on Fort Tryon Park with pictures of flower
                 gardens.

6/24/37  - 594 - Change of hours in twelve swimming pools opened May 29th.

6/28/37  - 595 - Dedication of plaque in honor of Lillian Wald, June 29th,
                 at playground at Cherry & Gouverneur Streets.

6/25/37  - 596 - Finals of magic contest, Sunday, June 27th, 2:30 p. m. on
                 the Mall.

5/28/37  - 597 - Exercises in connection with the completion of Fort Greene
                 Park, Tuesday, June 29th, at 1 p. in. Resume of work.

6/30/37  - 598 - Second Naumburg Concert, Central Park Mall, July 4th, 8:15.


7/2/37   - 599 - Opening ceremony Marine Parkway Bridge, 10:30 a.m., July 3rd.
                 
7/3/37   - 600 - New playground, Seventh Avenue & 86th Street, Brooklyn, and
                 Crotona Park East and Charlotte Street, Bronx. Remodeled
                 building at Victory Blvd and Park Boad, Richmond. 

7/14/37  - 601 - Completion of issuance of 2,000,000 in 3 per cent,
                 bonds upper level, Henry Hudson Bridge. Work to be done
                 described.

7/l6/37  - 602 - Bids opened for test borings proposed bulkhead wall along
                 Shore Road, Brooklyn. 

7/17/37  - 603 - Opening new playground, 179th Place, North of Jamaica Avenue,
                 and at Sayres Avenue, between 172nd Street & Merrick Road,
                 Queens. New brick building at 101st Street between Second
                 & Third Avenues, Manhattan, and new brick building in
                 Highbridge Park. Pictures.

7/19/37  - 604 - Exercises July 20th in all playgrounds in Manhattan, Bronx,
                 Brooklyn & Richmond for inducement of children.

7/19/37  - 605 - Letter to Hon. William O'Reilly from Commissioner reference
                 to President Street Baths.

7/20/37  - 606 - Park Dept. received bids for grading new roadway through
                 Inwood Hill Park. This is first contract to be paid out of
                 new 2,000,000 bond issue.

7/24/37  - 607 - Opening three new playgrounds & new automobile parking
                 field. In Queens at 173rd Street & 106th Avenue; at 174th
                 Place & 112th Avenue; in Richmond, Beechwood Avenue between
                 Cleveland Street & Crescent Avenue. New parking field in
                 Astoria Park. Pictures.  

7/26/37 -  608 - Completion of concrete bandshell & outdoor dance floor at
                 Colonial Park. Listing of seven areas for free outdoor
                 dancing.

7/28/37  - 609 - Opening of five playgrounds by Mayor LaGuardia: Brooklyn --
                 Pltkin & New Jersey Avenues; Howard, Pacific & Dean
                 Streets; Lafayette & Reed Avenues. Bronx -- 182nd Street &
                 Belmont Avenue. Queens -- Woodside Avenue between 52nd &
                 54th Streets.

7/29/37  - 610 - Third Naumburg series, Central Park Mall, July 1st. Programs. 

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 29 and 30, 1937

  The third concert of the Naumburg series of concerts will be piven on the
Mall, Central Park, on Saturday July 31 at 8:15 P.M.

  Jaffrey Harris will conduct the Naumburg Orchestra and J. Alden Edkins,
Bass-Baritone, will be the guest soloist.

  This is the Memorial Concert contributed by the sons of Mr. Elkan Naumburg;
on the anniversary of his death.

                                     End

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[NAUMBURG CONCERT FLYER]

MEMORIAL CONCERT
      SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 31ST, 1937
              EIGHT FIFTEEN O'CLOCK


     CENTRAL PARK       : :   ON THE MALL

THE NAUMBURG ORCHESTRA, Jaffrey Harris, Conductor

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                           THE MALL--CENTRAL PARK

                SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 31ST, AT 8:15 O'CLOCK

                              MEMORIAL CONCERT

                           THE NAUMBURG ORCHESTRA

                          JAFFREY HARRIS, Conductor

                   J. ALDEN EDKINS, Bass-Baritone, Soloist

                                   Program

                         "The Star Spangled Banner"

      Adagio Sostenuto from the Sixth Symphony               Tschaikowsky
                  IN MEMORY OF ELKAN NAUMBURG
                     Founder of these Concerts

 1.   Overture--"Barber   of Seville"                        Rossini

 2.   Andante Sostenuto from the First Symphony              Brahms

 3.   "Slavonic Dances"                                      Dvorak

 4.   "II Lacerato Spirito" from "Simon Bocanegra"           Verdi

                               J. Alden Edkins

 5.   Introduction and Cortege from "Coq d'Or" .             Rimsky-Korsakoff

                                INTERMISSION

 6.   Concert Overture in C Minor                            Jeffrey Harris
 7.   (a) Introduction to Act Three from "Lohengrin"    )
      (b) Prelude to Act Three from "Die Meistersinger" )    Wagner
      (c) Entrance of the Gods into Valhalla            )

 8.   Song of the Flea                                       Moussorgsky

                               J. Alden Edkins

 9.   Waltz--"Tales from the Vienna Woods"                   Strauss

10.   Final from the Fourth Symphony                         Tschaikowsky

                                  "America"

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HIS CONCERT is contributed by MR. WALTER W.  NAUMBURG and MR. GEORGE W.
NAUMBURG, sons of MR. ELKAN NAUMBURG, who donated the bandstand on The Mall
and lived to see it put to the purpose he had in mind of erecting a veritable
Temple of Music.


MR. ELKAN NAUMBURG had been impressed with the need of an adequate bandstand
in Central Park by reason of his custom, long years in practice, of
contributing Orchestral Concerts of high quality, in the cause of good music
for the people, on three holidays, Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor
Day. His sons, continuing this custom in his memory, have added a fourth
concert to the NAUMBURG series by giving a similar concert on July 31st, the
anniversary of their father's death.

THE NAUMBURG concerts for the season of 1937 are therefore set down for May
30th, at 8:15 P. M., July 4th, at 8:15 P. M., July 31st, at 8:15 P. M., and
Sep- tember 6th, at 8:15 P. M. These dates to be remembered by lovers of good
music.

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                              CITY OF NEW YORK
                      HON. FIORELLO H. LAGUARDIA, Mayor

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 28, 1937


                  Mayor LaGuardia will open five playgrounds, constructed by
the Department of Parks with relief labor and funds, on Friday, July 30th, at
4:00 P.M.  Separate exercises will be held at each of the following
playgrounds:


                  BROOKLYN - Pitkin and New Jersey Avenues
                             Howard, Pacific and Dean Streets
                             Lafayette and Reid Avenues

                  BRONX    - 182nd Street and Belmont Avenue

                  QUEENS   - Woodside Avenue between 52nd and 54th Streets.


                  The Mayor will be present at the Queens playground at
Woodside Avenue, 52nd and 54th Streets.  Besides the Mayor and Park
Commissioner Robert Moses, Honorable Joseph J. Kraebel, Alderman of the 60th
Queens Aldennanic District, and Mr. Pierce H. Power, Vice-President of the
Queens Chamber of Commerce will participate in the ceremonies.  The exercises
will be broadcast to each of the other playgrounds and amplified by separate
public address systems.

                  These playgrounds are five of the twenty-four sites in
neglected areas selected by the Commissioner of Parks and acquired by
condemnation after authorization by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment
on July 15, 1936.

                  Owing to the ever-increasing demand for roller-skating
facilities, four of the new playgrounds are equipped with modern
roller-skating tracks, and all are completely equipped with play apparatus
and are appropriately landscaped.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS                       FOR RELEASE JULY 27TH, 1937.
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK
TEL. REGENT 4-1000

           THE PARK DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES THE COMPLETION OF THE BRICK AND 
CONCRETE BAND SHELL AND GRANOLITHIC OUTDOOR DANCE FLOOR AT COLONIAL PARK,
BRADHURST AVENUE AND 147TH STREET IN THE HARLEM SECTION OF MANHATTAN ON
TUESDAY NIGHT JULY 27TH.

           MAYOR LA GUARDIA. PARK COMMISSIONER ROBERT MOSES AND BILL
ROBINSON, THE RADIO AND MOVIE STAR, WILL BE PRESENT AT 8:30 P.M. TO
OFFICIALLY OPEN THE AREA FOR THE DANCING WHICH WILL BE HELD EVERY SUCCEEDING
TUESDAY NIGHT FROM 8:30 P.M. TO 10:30 P.M.  BILL ROBINSON WILL ADD TO THE
ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT BY GIVING AN EXHIBITION OF HIS DANCING.

           THE FOLLOWING SEVEN AREAS ARE ALSO OPEN FOR FREE OUTDOOR
DANCING IN THE CITY PARK SYSTEM DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS FROM 8:30 PM
TO 10:30 P.M.

         LOCATION                                 SCHEDULE

         MALL, CENTRAL PARK                      TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
         PROSPECT PARK PICNIC GROUNDS            MONDAYS
         MULLALY RECREATION CENTER-              WEDNESDAYS
         JACKSON HEIGHTS PLAYGROUND              MONDAYS
         MC DONALD PLAYGROUND                    WEDNESDAYS
         ROOSEVELT PLAYGROUND                    FRIDAYS
         ASTORIA POOL                            EVERY SECOND FRIDAY


                                   - END -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 24, 1937


               The Department of Parks announces the opening of three new
playgrounds and a new automobile parking field today.

               In Queens, at 173rd Street and 106th Avenue, the new
playground for the North Jamaica is the first section of a large recreational
area which is being constructed to be completed.  It is for small children
and has slides, swings, see-saws, sand tables, play houses and a rectangular
wading pool which can be used for volleyball when not in use as a pool.
Benches and shade trees are also provided.  When the entire area is
completed, it will have facilities for baseball, football, tennis,
roller-skating, basketball, horseshoe pitching and paddle tennis, as well as
a four lap, mile running track.

               At 174th Place and 112th Avenue, in St. Albans Memorial Park,
the new playground is equipped with see-sows, swings, slides, jungle gym,
merry whirl, play houses, sand tables and a concrete shower basin.  Permanent
concrete benches and shade trees are also part of the landscaped layout.

               In Astoria Park under the Triborough Bridge, the new parking
field has a concrete surface and will accommodate 384 oars.  No fee is
charged for tho use of this facility, which should provide great convenience
for patrons of the popular Astoria pool, which has had as many as 14,619
visitors in one day.

               In the new Brighton section of Richmond, at Beechwood Avenue
between Cleveland Street nnd Crescent Avenue, the new plryground has a fully
equipped small children's section besides facilities for handball,
basketball, horseshoe pitching, paddle tennis, shuffle board and Softball for
older children and adults. Here, too, benches and shade trees are also
provided.

                                     End

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[THIS ANNOUNCEMENT IS MISFILED; SHOULD HAVE BEEN IN 1936 PRESS RELEASE ARCHIVE]

                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                                                                July 23, 1936

The Park Department announces that Mayor LaGuardia, Park Commissioner
Robert Moses, Hon. James J. Lyons, President of the Borough of the Bronx,
Hon. James A. Deering, Alderman of the 27th District, Victor
Ridder, Works Progress Administrator and Roderick Stephens, President
of the Bronx Bonrd of Trade will speak at the dedication exercises
coincident with the opening of the new bathing beach and bath house
facilities at Orchard Beach, Pelham Bay Park on Saturday, July 25th
at 1:00 P.M.

Although the entire development, a WPA project, has not been completed,
the facilities to be opened include a crcscent-shaped white
sand beach approximately 200 feet wide at high tide, and 2500 feet
long facing the Sound; a beach walk and concrete seawall, which forms
the backbone of the beach; two temporary parking fields that will
accommodate 3500 cars and a section of the two-story bath house having 1568
lockers for men and 540 lockers and 192 dressing rooms for women.

A new four-lane traffic road approximately two miles long, running from
Eastern Boulevard to the bath house, eliminates the former narrow circuitous
route from Eastern Boulevard to City Island.  Bus and taxi service will be
in operation from the bath house to the Pelham Bay station of the Lexington
Avenue line of the Interborough Rapid Transit.

When completed, Orchard Beach will compare favorably with Jones Beach.
Over 115 acres of land will have been added to Pelham Bay Park by the
addition of between 3,500,000 to 4,000,000 cubic yards of fill and the new
beach, approximately one mile long, will not occupy any land that was
formerly part of the park.

There will be a brick pavillion with limestone trim and colonnades of
simplified Greek architecture, with lockers and dressing room facilities for
over 5400 persons, a cafeteria, rest rooms and a [doggie?] terrace on the
second floor facing the Sound; a Mall 250 feet wide and 1400 feet long, with
benches and trees along the edges, connecting the bath house with a large
lagoon for small boating.  This lake will be provided with a tidal dam to
keep the water a permanent level.

In the Rodman Neck section there will be a parking space for 7000 cars;
athletic fields with nine baseball diamonds, seven football fields,
thirty-two tennis courts, a completely equipped children's play area and a
field house with dressing room, lockers, toilet and shower facilities.  A
small boat harbor will be provided.  The Split Rock and Pelham Bay golf
Courses and Golf House, about one mile distant from the beach, were opened
this spring.

The entire development is fitted into a landscape scheme taking full
advantage of the natural rocky hillside and weeded areas.

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[PHOTO OF PLAYGROUND]

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[In large handwriting...]

St. Albans Park Plgd. Queens

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 19, 1937


                                                      July 17, 1937.
Hon. William O'Reilly, 
472 Baltic Street
Brooklyn, N. Y,

Dear Alderman:

               I note in the press that you were one of the speakers at a
rally of South Brooklyn residents to protest about the progress of work on
the President Street bathhouse, and at this meeting a bathtowel march,
whatever that is, on the Mayor at the Summer City Hall, was suggested by
Assemblyman Mangano.

               I had already explained the situation to the Assemblyman, and
his attitude indicates clearly that he is more interested in making a
personal and political issue out of this matter than he is in doing something
for the people of your community. I was surprised, however, at your presence
at the rally, and assume that you do not know the facts.

               The facts are as follows:

            1. The President Street bath was a disgraceful institution, far
from providing facilities for large numbers of people of your district during
the summer.  It had only a very small pool, not much more than a large
bathtub. By no stretch of imagination could more than fifty people have used
this pool, at one time, with any degree of safety or comfort.  The wator in
this pool was polluted with raw sowage which leaked in from an adjacent sewer
main, and the entire building was constructed with an incredible lack of
intelligence and skill. As a matter of fact, it could not possibly have
passed an honest building inspection at the time it was constructed.

             2. This building was also used for tub and shower baths.  The
actual records shovred a very small usage for this purpose, and indicated
beyond any question that far from being a groat neighborhood attraction,
these baths had few users. Incidentally, there was a great deal of petty
thievery and other troubles, due to the mixing of grown-ups and children.

             3. This building was turned over to the Park Department by the
Borough President of Brooklyn for reconstruction and because of the bad
conditions there.  Our studies indicate that the proper use was as a local
gymnasium for the children of the neighborhood, and our plans were made
accordingly. We included some shower baths in place of the tubs, at the
earnest request of some local people, with a separate entrance to these
shower baths so that grown-ups could use them.

             4. As we proceeded with the work, we found that the building had
to be completely reconstructed.  It was difficult to arrive at a structural
steel design satisfactory to the Building Department. Delivery of steel
ordered by the relief authorities is now expected early in September. Work
will progress then with relief labor but the building cannot be completed
until late in the fall.

                In view of these facts it is preposterous to suggest at the
hottest time of the year that the President Street bath reconstruction will
have any vital effect on any large number of people in the noighborhood or
that a towel brigade march on City Hall has any sense.

                Your district immediately adjoins Red Hook, and you are fully
aware of all the improvements which have been made at Red Hook, including the
new swimming pool, which is readily accessible to the people of your
neighborhood. Hundreds of thousands of people in the city have to go a great
deal farther to got to one of the now pools. Let me add that in this general
section of Brooklyn we also have another swimming pool at Sunset Park, and
that considering that we only had the resources to build eleven new pools in
the entire city and reconstruct one old one, this part of Brooklyn has not
boon neglected or overlooked.

                 May I suggest that if you want to do something worth while
for your community, you ask the local people to support the request which I
have submitted to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment to round out and
purchase as a permanent playground, the Brooklyn Union Gas Company property
at the head of the Gowanus Canal fronting on Douglas, Mcvins and Degraw
Streets and Third Avenue.  We have a small temporary playground there now on
a permit from this Company, and we are able to buy at the assessed valuation
of the land the entire block which includes the present temporary playground.
If this now playground is added to others established in your district, and
if you will examine the map, you will see that more has been done in the last
three and a half years for recreation in this part of Brooklyn than was done
in the previous fifty years.

                   I am sending a copy of this letter to my friend, Alderman
Frank Cunningham who, I am sure, will be in sympathy with its contents.

                                    Very truly yours,

                                         Robert Moses

                                         Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 19, 1937


               On Tuesday, July 20th, at 3:00 P.M., special exercises will
take place in all the Park Department playgrounds in Manhattan, Bronx,
Brooklyn and Richmond in an effort to induce children to become regular
attendants at the playgrounds, make wider and more intensive use of the
facilities and by taking children off streets reduce accidents. "Get A New
Member" will be the campaign slogan of the children who now use the Park
Department recreational facilities daily.

               In the playgrounds there are activities and facilities
available for all age groups. For the very small children there are
kindergarten swings, wading pools, sandboxes, doll houses, puppet and
marionette shows, handicraft, song-plays and story-telling hours. For
children between the ages of six and eleven years there are large swings,
slides and jungle gym.  Group and team games, in addition to such activities
as arts and crafts, music and dramatics, are also conducted under the
supervision and direction of the playground directors.

               The children over twelve years of age are organized into clubs
that train them for good citizenship, respect for authority and obedience to
rules and regulations and inculcate loyalty to their playground and create a
greater interest in their local neighborhood, parks and playgrounds.

               The Borough of Queens conducted a special member drive on June
16th, and as a result of the special program there has been a marked increase
in attendance at both the large and small playgrounds.

               On July 20th, at each playground a special program will be
conducted consisting of singing, athletics, demonstrations of various games,
arts and crafts, music and dramatics. Athletic, civic, dramatic, handicraft,
literary, orchestral, glee, social, checker and chess clubs are permanent
fixtures in most of the playgrounds at present. A Junior Park Protective
League has also been organized to prevent unnecessary vandalism and
destruction to lawns, trees and shrubs in the parks and playgrounds.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 17, 1937


                 The Department of Parks announces the opening of two
new playgrounds and two new buildings, today.

                 In Queens, at 179th Place north of Jamaica Avenue, the new
playground is equipped with see-saws, swings, slides, jungle gym, sand
tables, play-houses and a rectangular wading pool, 50 feet x 70 feet, for
small children. There is also a large open play area and shuffle board and
handball courts for older children. Benches and shade trees are also
provided.

                 At Sayres Avenue between 172nd Street and Merrick Boulevard
in St. Albans Memorial Park, the new playground has facilities for softball
and basketball, besides see-saws, swings, horizontal bars and ladders. Here
too, benches and shade trees are part of the layout.

                 In Manhattan, at 101st Street between Second and Third
Avenues in Yorkville Playground, the new brick building, with slate roof,
houses boys* and girls' comfort stations and a large play-room for indoor
games during inclement weather.

                 At 173rd Street and Amsterdam Avenue in Highbridge Park, a
new brick building, with copper roof, will be used as a concession stand to
serve spectators and bathers at the swimming pool.

                                     End

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[PHOTO OF PLAYGROUND]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 16, 1937


               Bids were opened today by the Department of Parks, at the
Arsenal, Central Park, for a contract for Test Borings on the line of
the proposed Bulkhead Wall along Shore Road, Brooklyn. The three lowest
Bidders were:
               Standard Drilling Co.
               60 East 42nd Street, N.Y.C              $2437.50

               Riley Engineering & Drilling Co.
               1733 East 31st St., Brooklyn, N.Y        3350.00

               Sprague & Henwood, Inc.
               11 West 42nd Street, N.Y.C               4000.00

and the Engineer's Estimate was $2500.00.

               This contract is first step toward the improvement of one of
New York's finest stretches of shore front, overlooking the lower Bay and the
Narrows.

               The information on sub-surface conditions obtained from about
twenty-five test borings will be used to determine the design and the amount
of material necessary for a new bulkhead wall to be built from Fort Hamilton
to Owl's Head Park.  The new wall will be similar to the one already
completed around Fort Hamilton and will create a strip of land for the future
construction of Shore Parkway from Fort Hamilton to Owl's Head Park.  This
stretch of parkway will be an important link in the Brooklyn Circumferential
Highway, connecting with the proposed Hamilton Avenue tunnel on the north,
joining with the completed portion past Fort Hamilton and ultimately running
past Coney Island, through Marine Park and over the new Marine Parkway Bridge
to Jacob Riis Park.

               After the new bulkhead wall is completed a wide pedestrian
promenade will be constructed connecting with the section recently completed
in front of Fort Hamilton. Reclaimed land behind the wall will form new park
areas totalling 24.3 acres to provide recreational facilities between the
parkway and the Old Shore Road.

                                   ### ###

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 14, 1937


               The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announced today that it had
successfully completed the issuance of $2,000,000 in new 3% sinking fund
bonds for the addition of an upper level to the Henry Hudson Bridge and for
increased roadway facilities through Inwood Hill Park and the Spuyten Duyvil
section of the Bronx.  Recently the Authority, through its bankers, James H.
Causey & Co., Inc., and Stranahan-Harris, approached the bondholders of the
original issue of $3,100,000 and received the consent of the holders of over
two-thirds of the issue so that the new offering could be made immediately.
Under the original bond resolution the Authority was limited to the issuance
of $1,400,000 in bonds after the first full year's successful operation.  The
operation of the Henry Hudson Bridge', however, since it first began
collecting tolls on December 14 of last year, has been so successful that it
dispelled any doubts as to the ability of the Authority to finance the
additional issue.  The three millionth car passed over the bridge on
Saturday, July 10, a few days less than seven months' full operation.

               The anticipated opening of the West Side Improvement on
October 1 of this year made it imperative to start immediately on the
provision for additional traffic facilities over the Henry Hudson Parkway
from its junction with the West Side Improvement at the end of Riverside
Drive to West 239th Street in the Bronx.  The present use of the Henry Hudson
is so heavy that the existing facilities are taxed to the limit at peak
periods.  When the new parkway, being constructed as part of the West Side
Improvement from 72nd to Dyckman Street, is completed the additional
facilities leading traffic to the Henry Hudson Parkway will be so greatly
increased that the present facilities of the Henry Hudson Parkway would be
considerably overtaxed.  Therefore, it is planned to use the present level of
the bridge and the pesent pavement through Inwood Hill Park for southbound
traffic only and to construct a new parkway roadway from Dyckman Street
through Inwood Hill Park to lead onto the proposed upper level of the Henry
Hudson Bridge to bring the northbound traffic from Manhattan into the
Bronx. The toll gates will be increased in number from a total of eight to
eight in each direction. A pedestrian underpass will be built under the new
roadway in Inwood Hill Park so that the parkway will not split the park and
the existing walk system, with a few minor changes, will be held intact. When
the Henry Hudson Bridge was built it was designed to carry an upper level
when needed and the new construction will be carried on without interrupting
the flow of traffic over the lower level.

          Through the Spuyten Duyvil area of the Bronx, parkway roadways were
only constructed two lanes in width in each direction from the north end of
tho bridge to West 239th Street and Riverdale Avenue, from which point the
central roadways were widened to three lanes in each direction to the city
line. At this point the Henry Hudson Parkway joins the Saw Mill River Parkway
and through this the Westchestor County Parkway System.  The Authority now
proposes to widen the central roadways through the Spuyten Duyvil section
from two to three lanes in each direction to provide the needed roadway
capacity for both the upper and lower levels on the Henry Hudson Bridge, At
the same time it is proposed to widen the landscaping area so that this
section may be adequately landscaped as a true parkway and the sidewalk
widths will be increased from ten to fifteen feet to allow for proper
development in this local area.  On July 9 the Board of Estimate and
Apportionment approved the plan and instituted the proceeding for the
acquisition of the additional land necessary for the improvement of this
section. It is estimated that the title will actually vest about August 1 of
this year. The cost of the additional land, as well as the construction, will
be paid for entirely by the Henry Hudson Parkway Authority.

          Construction has already been started on the new junction of the
West Side Improvement and the Henry Hudson Parkway where a contractor is
preparing the ground work for the construction of the new bridge over Dyckman
Street. The first contract, to be paid for out of the new bond issue
consisting of the grading of the new roadway throuph Inwood Hill Park was
advertised by the Authority on July 10 and bids will be received by the
Authority on July 20. Approximately two weeks later bids will be received for
the construction of the upper level of the Henry Hudson Bridge, which has
already been designed in anticipation of the bond issue. This, in turn, will
be immediately followed by contracts covering the work through the Spuyten
Duyvil area.

          It is anticipated this work will be completely let this year or the
beginning of 1938. This will mark the completion of probably the most
important urban express artery in the country.  It connects on the north the
Bronx, Westchester, upper New York and New England, and on the south
Manhattan, Brooklyn and through the George Washington Bridge, Midtown and
Holland Tunnels, New Jersey and the eastern part of the United States south
of New York.  It will be possible to proceed from Canal Street in Manhattan
to the city line at West Chester without the interference of cross traffic
and red lights.

                                           ROBERT MOSES
                                           Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    July 3, 1937


                  The Department of Parks announces the opening of two new
and one remodeled buildings today.

                  In Brooklyn at Seventh Avenue and 86th Street, in Dyker
Beach Park, the new brick golf clubhouse has a large lounge, a check-room,
men and women's locker rooms with showers, and a professional shop and
show-room.  The building is not quite completed and work is still proceeding
on the East Wing, which, when completed, will be used as a modem restaurant
with a large dining room.

                  In The Bronx at Crotona Park East and Charlotte Street, in
Crotona Park, the new brick building has comfort facilities for boys and
girls and a play director's room.

                  In Richmond at Victory Boulevard and Park Road, in Silver
Lake Park, the old garage and engineers' building has been remodeled into a
modern golf clubhouse.  On the first floor there is a large lounge, a
cafeteria and raon's locker and shower rooms.  On the second floor there is a
sitting room and women's locker and shower rooms.

                                     End

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[PHOTOS OF BUILDINGS]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 30, 1937


     The second Naumburg Concert of the Season will take place
on the Mall in Central Park on Independence Day, July 4 at 8:15 P.M.

     Lajos Shuk will conduct the Haumburg Orchestra. Hazel Hayes,
Soprano,and Alice de Cevee, Pianist, are to be the guest soloists
of the evening.

     Other Naumburg Concerts will be given on July 31 and September 6
at the same location in Central Park, completing the series of four
which is given every year for the music lovers of New York Gity.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release Monday
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 28, 1937



                    The Department of Parks announces that exercises in
connection with the completion of the rehabilitation of Fort Greene Park,
Brooklyn, will take place on Tuesday, June 29th, a t 1:00 P.M.

                 Besides Mayor LaGuardia, Park Commissioner Eobert Moses and

Raymond T. Ingersoll, Borough President of Brooklyn, Col. Wm. A. Dawkins,
Col. Casper V. Gunther and Captain R. A. Koch, will participate in the
ceremonies.

                 For more than a year relief forces have been busily engaged
in remodeling and renovating this 30-acre historic park, bounded by Myrtle
Avenue, St. Edwards Street , Washington and DeKalb Avenues.  Work has
progressed in sections so that the public were not excluded from the park.

                 The Martyr's Monument erected in 1907 at a cost of
$200,000., standing on a hilltop like a sentry over the remains of American
Revolutionists who died aboard British Prison Ships in Wallabout Bay, has
been renovated and furnished with new bronze doors and grilles.  Two new
completely equipped playgrounds have been added to the park; one for small
children at the DeKalb and Washington Avenues entrance, and the other for
older children at the St. Edwards Street and Myrtle Avenue side of the park.

                 The entrance and Plaza at Myrtle Avenue leading up to the
Monument has been redesigned and reconstructed on a scale commensurate with
the Monument, and laid out to provide not only benches under shade trees for
passive recreation, but also a roller skating area.

                 The comfort station has been renovated and modornized; walks
realigned; many permanent benches placed; the contours of landscaping
changed, lawn areas reseeded and many new trees planted, all fitting in to a
comprehensive landscape scheme.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 25, 1937


           The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the Magic
Contest will take place on Sunday, June 27 at 2:30 P.M. on the Mall, Central
Park.

           As a result of playground and borough eliminations,
14 boys have been selected to represent the boroughs in the
final competition. All kinds of magic acts from "The Boy
Magician" to "A Symphony in Silks" will be performed.

           The judges of the contest are Mr. John Cooper, ventriloquist, and
Mr, D. Belmont, Magician.  Contestants will be judged according to
performance and showmanship.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 28, 1937


                    The Department of Parks announces that a plaque will be
dedicated in honor of Lillian D. Wald on Tuesday, June 29th, at 2:45 P.M.,
at the playground - Cherry, Monroe and Gouverneur Streets, Manhattan.

                    Besides Mayor LaGuardia and Park Commissioner Robert
Moses, Miss Helen Hall, Mr. George W. Alger and Mrs. Felix M. Warburg will
speak at the ceremonies.  As a tribute to Miss Wald, more than one hundred
nurses and supervisors of the Visiting Nurses Service will attend in uniform,
as well as many of her friends and former associates.  Miss Wald who
celebrated her seventieth birthday on March 10th last, will not be able to
attend as she has been confined to her home in Westport, Connecticut, because
of poor health.

                    On March 9th, 1937, the Board of Aldermen honored Miss
Wald, founder of the Henry Street Settlement, by adopting a resolution naming
in her honor this playground in the heart of the district where she has done
her charitable work for many years.

                    The plaque which has been erected on the recreation
building reads as follows:

                               THIS PLAYGROUND
                                IS NAMED FOR

                               LILLIAN D. WALD

                               IN APPRECIATION
                             OF HER PIONEER WORK
                                FOR CHILDREN
                            AND DISTRICT NURSING
                                IN THIS CITY

                                    1937


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 7, 1937


              The Park Department announces that the Mary Harriman Rumsey
Playground in Central Park, on the site of the old Casino, is completed and
will be opened to the public Friday, May 7th, without formal ceremony,
although later this month a cast bronze plaque, now in place, will be
unveiled by the Harriman family and interested friends, in memory of Mrs.
Rumsey who, as a philanthropist, was enthusiastically interested in child
welfare.

              After a legal conflict which started shortly after Commissioner
Moses took office in January, 1934, the city gained on May 1st, 1936, an
unanimous victory in the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court on the
question of the Park Department's right to remove, for purposes of other park
development, buildings which has been erected solely as incidental to park
use.  Immediately W. P. A. workmen started to tear down the old Casino,
formerly an exclusive high-priced restaurant and night-club set aside for a
few people of wealth, and of no use to the general public.

              This one and one-quarter acre area occupied by the Casino
building and its parking space, now offers facilities for a juvenile age
group not provided for in the marginal playgrounds for small children located
around the perimeter of Central Park and marks another step in setting aside
active play space within the park to insure to older people the enjoyment of
nearby spaces for quiet and relaxation.  Besides swings, slides and other
play equipment, a large oval-shaped wading pool has been constructed.
Encircling it is a roller-skating track, around whose outer edge are
permanent benches under shade trees for guardians of children and for
children to adjust their skates.  Comfort facilities for boys and girls,
separated by a latticed open shelter, are incorporated in a brick building of
Georgian architecture.  The entire area, including paths and landscaping was
designed to connect and fit the playground to existing surrounding park
features.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 24, 1937


              The Department of Parks announces that, beginning June 26th,
the hours of operation of its twelve swimming pools which opened Saturday,
May 29th, will be extended from 6:00 P.M.  to 10:00 P.M.

              To date, this year, the pools have been used by 276,088 people,
of which 12,515 were children under fourteen years of age admitted during the
weekday free periods from 10:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.

              Swimming meets are being held daily at the various pools to
determine teams which will compete at the swimming carnival to be held
Saturday afternoon, June 26th, at Red Hook Pool in Brooklyn, as a feature of
"Swim-For-Health-Week."  Medals will be awarded to the individual winners,
and the Major Namm Trophy will be presented to the pool whose team scores the
most points.

                                     ###

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Immediate Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 19, 1937

            The Department of Parks announces that in Fort Tryon Park on
Broadway from 192nd Street to Dyckman Street many perennial plants are
flowering in great profusion.  Besides delphiniums, there are also roses,
sedums and a fine show of other flowering plants in profusion.

            This 70 acre Park, formerly the estate of C.K.G. Billings, was
acquired and developed by John D. Rockefeller, Jr. at a cost of
$7,000,000. prior to being turned over to the City.  It is situated on one of
the highest points in Manhattan and commands an impressive view across the
Hudson to the Palisades. Despite its rugged terrain it is a spot of natural
beauty and abounds in fine trees, shrubs, and flowers which have been set out
in the fashion of a fine private estate.  The terraced slopes and foliage
make an effective background for the floral displays.

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[PHOTOS OF FORT TRYON PARK]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 18, 1937


               The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Second Annual Amateur Musical Instrument Contest for the children will take
place on the Mall, Central Park, on Saturday, June 19 at 2:30 P.M.

               The winners of the borough final eliminations will compete at
the finals. The contestants have been divided into three age groups: the
sixth through the ninth year; tenth through the thirteenth year and the
fourteenth through the sixteenth year.  Pianists may use the piano provided
by the Department of Parks. All other contestants will bring their own
instruments some of which will be drums, fife, saxaphone, xylophone,
accordion, harmonica, violin. Each contestant will be permitted one solo to
be completed within five minutes.

               Bronze medals will be awarded to the borough winners and one
gold and one silver modal will be awarded to the winners in each of the age
groups.

               The judges of the contest will be Miss Frederique Petrides,
Conductor of the Orchestrette Classique; Mr. Herman Katiras, concert pianist
and Mr. Arthur T. Cremin, Director of the New York Schools of Music.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
 ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release
                                                             IMMEDIATELY
                                    (Copy)

                              CITY OF HEW YORK
                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                                   Arsenal
                         64th Street and Fifth Avenue
                                 New York City


                                                             June 12, 1937

Col. Brehon Somervell, Administrator
U. S. Works Progress Administration
  for The City of New York
70 Columbus Avenue
New York City

Dear Colonel:

         I have your terrifying letter telling me that Mr. Brady, the general
superintendent in charge of the Bronx Park relief forces, whose jurisdiction
includes Randall's Island, may go to jail for six months or be subjected to a
large fine, or both, for working eight mechanics eight hours overtime to
complete the cafeteria at Randall's Island in time for its formal
opening. This overtime has no effect on your payrolls or on the earnings of
these mechanics, because the plumbers can only get 56 hours a month or a
total of $84 and the electricians only 52 hours a month or a total of $86.28.

         The fine and imprisonment business is bunk of the old army rough
stuff variety. You can pull this sort of thing on the Florida Ship Canal, but
not in New York City. You know that this was an emergency, and that the law
permits exemptions for emergency work. It was in fact so trivial that I knew
nothing about it, and it was handled as a matter of routine. Quite
incidentally, the terrible incident you complain of happened three days
before Brady took over the Randall's Island work and when Richard Johnson,
who resigned to take a position with one of the contractors at the World's
Fair, was in charge. So you will have to sick the bloodhounds on Johnson.

         Brady happens to be one of the first class superintendents to whom
we are indebted for getting results in spite of the red tape and general
collapse of W.P.A. efficiency. You ought to be grateful to people of this
kind instead of harrassing them. As a matter of fact, Brady, like Johnson and
the other remaining first rate superintendents, will drop out of the relief
program shortly and go back into private construction work where good
executives are adequately paid, where they work under normal conditions and
not in a mad house, and where their services are appreciated.

         I have some sizable construction contracts under my direction
throughout the city, and observe daily the glaring contrast between this work
and relief work. Any administrator who tries to make a major issue out of
eight men working eight hours' overtime is just looking for something to
quibble about.

                               Very truly yours,

                                      ROBERT MOSES

                                                  Commissioner

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                   (Copy)

                     U. S. WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION
                          FOR THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                             70 Columbus Avenue
                               New York, N. Y.

                                                        June 11, 1937

Hon, Robert Moses, Commissioner,
Department of Parks,
The Arsenal,
64th Street and Fifth Avenue,
New York City.

Dear Commissioner Moses:

          I am returning without my approval a request made by your
department for my authorization, after the fact, for working eight mechanics
eight hours' over time on May 28th.

          Were Mr. Brady an employee of the United States he would be subject
to the penalties provided in the act of March 3, 1913, namely, $1000 fine or
imprisonment for not more than six months or both.

          May I again ask you to issue the necessary instructions to your
department to see that persons are not worked more than the eight hours
provided by law.

                                    Sincerely yours,

                                     BREHON SOMERVELL

                                          Administrator


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                                   (Copy)
                         TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE AUTHORITY

                                                             June 8, 1937
FOR RELEASE THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 1937

TOWERS OF THE BRONX-WHITESTONE BRIDGE

             Proposals for the construction of the towers of the
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge will be opened Wednesday, June 23rd, at the office of
the Triborough Bridge Authority on Randall's Island.

             This is the second aajor contract to be advertised since the
project was financed by the Authority in April) bids for the first, covering
the construction of the tower piers and anchorage foundations, having been
opened on June 8th.

             Eight bids were received. The low bidder was Frederick Snare
Corporation with a bid of $1,895,668. This was well within the original
estimate made for this part of the work, the contract was awarded to the low
bidder and work will begin as quickly as the necessary formalities can be
completed. The work program calls for the completion ot the Bronx Anchorage
foundation by December, 1937 and of the Bronx Tower pier by February 15,
1938, also for the completion of Queens Tower pier by April 15, 1938 and of
the Queens Anchorage foundation by May 15, 1938.

             The Bronx-Whitestone Bridge will span the East River between the
Whitestone section of Queens at approximately 145th Place and the peninsula
known as Old Ferry Point in the Bronx.  The entire project embraces not only
the East River suspension bridge and its approaches but also parkway
connections from Eastern Boulevard in the Bronx and Southern Boulevard in
Queens, the latter crossing the Flushing River via a double leaf bascule
bridge.

            The suspension bridge will have a center span of 2,500 feet and
side spans of 735 feet. In length of clear span between towers it will be the
third longest over built, being exceeded only by the spans of the Golden
Gate Bridge and the George Washington Bridge.

            The towers are to be erected on concrete piers founded on rock
and located in the river shoreward of the pierhead lines on either side.
They will be of structural steel. Care has been used in their design to
secure simplicity along with a distinctive appearance in keeping with their
monumental cnaracter.  Each will consist of two cellular columns or shafts
connected at the top end just below the roadway level by arched portals. They
will be 380 ft. high and will support the two main cables; 6,800 tons of
structural steel are required for the two towers.

            Time is an extremely important element in the entire project and
the period allowed for the tower contract is carefully fitted into the
complete construction program in order that the bridge may be finished and
ready to serve World's Fair traffic June 1, 1939. The first several months of
the tower contract time will be spent in the preparation of the contractor's
working drawings, the fabrication of the steel in the shops and in other work
preliminary to actual erection of the towers at the site.  Early in 1938 the
tower piers are to be ready for the erection of the tower steel and by the
middle of June, 1938 the towers must be completed In order that the erection
of footbridges and spinning equipment for the cables say proceed.

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF BRONX-WHITESTONE BRIDGE ANNOUNCEMENT OMITTED]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    June 12, 1937


                The Department of Parks announces the opening of two new
playgrounds and a recreation building today.

                In Manhattan, at Fifth Avenue between West 130th and West
131st Streets, the new playground is equipped with swings, see-saws, slides,
jungle gym, sand tables, playhouses, a rectangular wading pool, handball and
shuffleboard courts. There is also a large open play area for group
games. Around the perimeter of the playground is a landscape area with shade
trees under which are benches for mothers and guardians of children. A small
brick comfort station with slate roof which has facilities for boys and girls
is also provided.

                In Brooklyn, at Avenue L between E. 17th and E. 18th Streets,
the new playground has swings, see-saws, slides, sand tables, playhouses,
handball, horseshoe pitching and shuffleboard courts.  There is also a wading
pool, a softball diamond and an oval shaped roller skating rink. Benches and
shade trees are also provided.

                These playgrounds are two of the twenty-four sites in
neglected areas selected by the Commissioner of Parks and acquired by
condemnation after authorization by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment.

                In the playground at Bedford Avenue and Avenue X, the new
brick recreation building of "T" shape design has comfort facilities for boys
and girls, a mother's room and a large playroom for indoor games during
inclement weather.

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[PHOTO OF PLAYGROUND]

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                                                          DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                                                          PRESS RELEASE
                                                          JUNE 3, 1937.

    The twelve outdoor swimming pools operated by the Department of Parks
opened for the season on Saturday, May 28th, at 10 A.M.  It was originally
planned to operate the pools from 10:00 A.M. to 6 P.M., until June 26th, when
the pools will be open until 10:00 P.M..  Due to the extreme heat on Tuesday,
June 1st, the hours of operation were extended to 8 o'clock and this
extension of operations will be in effect on days when the heat is
oppressive.

    For the holiday Weekend, 41,776 children and 18.745 adults took advantage
of the hot weather and the opening of the pools.  For Tuesday, June 1st, the
attendance was 14,782 of which 930 were children admitted during the free
period from 10 A.M. to 12:00 Noon.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 29th, 1937


          As part of its recreational program to provide open air enjoyment
to the users of parks during the sunaer months, the Department of Parks
announces the following schedules of dramas, concerts and dancing.

        The dramas, conducted by the Federal Theatre Group, start on Tuesday,
June 1st, the concerts on Sunday, May 30th, with the Naumberg Concert on the
Mall in Central Park, and the dancing on Monday, June 7th, at the Prospect
Park picnic grounds, Brooklyn, and at Jackson Heights Playground in Queens.


                               DRAMA SCHEDULE

                                 SUMMER 1937

BROOKLYN

                     Owl's Head Park                    Tuesdays
                     Gravesend Park                     Wednesdays
                     Kelly Parlr                        Thursdays
                     Prospect Park                      Fridays

QUEENS

                     Highland park                      Tuesdays
                     Forest Park                        Wednesdays
                     King Park                          Thursdays

BRONX

                     St. Mary's Park                    Tuesdays
                     Crotona Park                       Wednesdays

MANHATTAN

                     Corlears Hook Park                 Thursdays
                     Washington Square Park             Fridays
                     Roosevelt Park                     Saturdays

RICHMOND

                     Silver Lake Park                   Tuesdays
                     Wolf's Pond Park                   Saturdays

                              CONCERT SCHEDULE

                                 SUMMER 1937

MANHATTAN

           Mall

                  Goldman Band Concerts                      8:30 P.M.
                     Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Friday - (except July 4th)
                     Starts June 16 - ends August 15

                  Judge Prince Concerts                      8:30 P.M.
                     June 22, 26 - July 3, 10, 17, 24

                  Naumborg Concerts                          8:15 P.M.
                     May 30 - July 4, 31 - Sept. 6

BROOKLYN

           Prospect Park Music Grove

               Goldman Band Concert                        8:30 P.M.
                  Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday
                  Starts June 16 - ends August 15

               Judge Prince Concert                        3:00 P.M.
                  Juno 27 - July 4, 11, 18, 25

               New York Str.to Synphonic Br.nd             8:30 P.M.
                  Wednesdays - Starts June 9

BRONX

           Poe Park

               Hudson Concert Band                         8:30 P.M.
                  Mondays - Starts June 7th

QUEENS

           Forest Pork

               Manhattan Concert Band                      8:30 P.M.
                  Sunday, Tuesday, Friday
                  Starts June 8th

           King Park

               Hudson Concert Band                         8:30 P.M.
                  Wednesdays - Starts June 9th

Those three bands will alternate at Forest Park.

                               DANCE SCHEDULE

                                 SUMMER 1937

                                                          Date of
Location                           Schedule               First Dance

Mall, Central Park                 Tuesdays & Thursdays   June 8th

Prospect Park Picnic Grounds       Mondays                June 7th

Mullaly Recreation Center          Wednesdays             June 9th

Jackson Heights Pled.              Mondays                June 7th

Me Donald Plgd.                    Wednesdays             June 9t h

Roosevelt Plgd.                    Fridays                June 11th

Colonial Plgd.                     Tuesdays               June 8th

Astoria Pool                       Every second Friday    June 11th

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               May 28, 1937

                     U. S. WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION
                          FOR THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                      70 Columbus Ave., New York, N.Y.
                                                                 May 20, 1937

Brehon Somervell
   Administrator

Mr. Allyn R. Jennings
General Superintendent
Department of Parks
The Arsenal, Central Park
New York, N. Y.

Dear Allyn,

            In accordance with the understanding expressed by Commissioner
Moses in his letter of May 7th and Colonel Somervell in his reply of May
11th, employment on the Parks Projects will be reduced by 5,000 persons on
June 1st.

           In order that this office may have time to arrange for the
necessary discharges and transfers involved, it is requested that the names
of the 5,000 persons be furnished this office not later than Friday, May 28,
1937.

                                                  Sincerely,

                                                H. L. PECKHAM
                                          ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR
                                          In charge of Operations


                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                            ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK
                                                                  May 26, 1937

Col. Brehon Somervell
Works Progress Administrator
70 Columbus Avenue
New York City.

Dear Colonel:

                       The list of an additional fire thousand relief workers
to be transferred from the Park Department will be furnished to you on
Tuesday, June 1st. There has been considerable difficulty in working this
out, be- cause of the problem of keeping work going on existing projects,
maintaining order and seme semblance of efficiency. This cut will, of course,
seriously delay the completion of the Park Projects.

                                          Cordially,

                                                   ROBERT MOSES
                                                   Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 27, 1937


             Saturday morning at 10:30 A.M. in the Children's Garden at Fort
Green Park, Myrtle Avenue and North Portland Street, Brooklyn, neighborhood
children will sow the first seeds in the new little garden plots.

             Each child will have an individual garden 4 x 3 ft. for the
first planting. They will plant early vegetable seeds which can be harvested
in time to allow another group of children to plant the seeds for fall
harvesting.

             Although this Garden is in the heart of a heavily congested area
a rural touch is added, by an old fashioned dipping well from which the
youngsters can fill their watering cans to water their gardens. It differs
however, from the country well by being only 18 inches deep.

             Flower beds and other sections of this "Bit of Country in the
City", will be occupied with plants of economic interest such as cotton,
peanuts, flax, wheat, Indian Corn and old-fashioned herbs. All these should
prove Interesting and educational to children and adults who will visit this
garden to enjoy the growing plants and flowers from convenient benches
located within the garden.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 27, 1937


           The Department of Parks announces the reopening of its twelve
swimming pools on May 29th at 10 A.M. Eleven of these are new pools opened
last year for the first time; the twelth, located in Faber Park, Richmond,
has been in operation for five years.

           During the fall, winter and spring, these pools have been
operating as free play centers.  Various facilities, such as handball,
volleyball, paddle tennis, etc., were provided and used by approximately
2,000,000 children and adults under competent Park Department supervision.
For the past month they have been closed to the public in order to do the
necessary cleaning and repairing to put them in readiness for summer
operations, and the floors and side walls of the pools have been freshly
painted.

           Last year these pools were used by approximately 1,800,000 people,
although only open for less than 50% of the normal operating season, and
despite the fact that none of them were completed in final form.  This year
the construction has been entirely finished and all facilities that were
temporary have been replaced with permanent ones.  They are located as
follows:


Manhattan:    Hamilton Fish           E. Houston & Sheriff Streets
              Thomas Jefferson        111th to 114th St. & First Ave.
              Colonial                Bradhurst Ave., W. 145th to 147th St.
              Highbridge              Amsterdam Ave. & 173rd Street

Brooklyn:     McCarren                Nassau Ave. & Lorimer Street
              Sunset                  7th Ave. & 43rd Street
              Red Hook                Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets
              Betsy Head              Hopkinson, Dumont & Livonia Streets

Bronx:        Crotona                  173rd Street cc Fulton Avenue

Queens:       Astoria                  Barclay Street and 24th Avenue

Richmond:     Faber                    Faber St., bet. Richmond Terrace &
                                            Kill Van Kull
              Tompkinsville            Arrietta Street at Pier No. 6


           From May 29th to June 26th, the pools will open at 10:00 A.M. and
close at 6:00 P.M.  From June 27th until the termination of the season, the
pools will open at 10:00 A.M. and close at 10:00 P.M. daily.  In cool
weather, the water will be heated.

           On weekdays from 10:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. the free period for
children under 14 years of age, during which no adults are admitted to the
pool areas will be continued.  After 1:00 P.M. on weekdays and all day on
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, there is a 10 cent charge for children under
14 years of age and a 20 cent charge for older children and for adults.

           An extensive aquatic program, has been planned for the coming
swinriing season.  Group swimming and diving instructions, intra and
inter-pool competition, water shows, water polo tournaments and life saving
and first aid classes will make up the major portion of the program.  The
season will be climaxed with the annual five borough swimming and diving
championship, on a date to be announced in the future.

           Orchard Beach at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx, and Jacob Riis Park, on the
Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, will open on Saturday, June 19th.

           At Jacob Riis Park there will be accommodations for approximately
14,000 cars, in the largest single unit paved parking space in the United
States, while the bath house has been enlarged to accommodate 10,000 patrons
and provide a modern up to date beach restaurent.  An 18 hole pitch and putt
golf course, shuffleboard and other amusements will line a now line a new
mile long 40 foot boardwalk.  The former inadequate beach has been materially
widened, with now concession buildings flanking a mall opposite its widest
part.

           The opening of the new Marine Parkway Bridge, on July 3rd, which
will connect Brooklyn with the Rockaways, will afford easy access to and from
Jacob Riis Park and should tremendously increase its popularity.

           At Orchard Beach there will be parking facilities for
approximately 5,000 cars, a bath house to accommodate 7,000 patrons, a wide
mile long beach promenade and modern restaurant facilities.  An open air,
terrazzo surfaced dance floor fronts the bath house.

           Recreational areas will be available to the public at both
beaches, providing shuffleboard, paddle tennis and handball courts, and other
amusements similar to those at Jones Beach.

           At both beaches there wiil be a 25 cents parking fee for
automobiles; a charge of 15 cents for a child's locker, 25 cents for an
adult's locker and 50 cents for a dressing room (per person).  Beach shops
are also provided where bathing accessories may be purchased and where beach
umbrellas and chairs may be rented at a nominal charge.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 29, 1937


          The first Naumburg concert of the season will take place on
Memorial Day, Sunday, May 30th, at 8:15 PlM., on the Mall, Central Park.
Leon Barzin vfill conduct.  Arnold Eidus, violinist, will be the guest
soloist for the evening.

          This is one of several concerts given on the Mall throughout the
summer and is looked forward to by all music lovers.

          Attached is copy of the program.

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[NAUMBURG CONCERT PROGRAM OMITTED -- SEE PDF]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 25, 1937


           The New York City World's Fair Commission took bids today on the
construction of foundations for the New York City building in Flushing Meadow
Park.   The three low bidders were:

              1. Palmo Construction Co.
                    105-15 - 103rd Avenue
                    Ozone Park, L.I. N.Y             $178,484.00

              2. Reiss & Weinsier, Inc.
                    105 Court Street
                    Brooklyn, N.Y.                    184,367.00

              3. J. P. Rice Bldg., Co.
                    11 TJest 42nd Street
                     New York, N.Y.                   186,976.20

              The Engineer's estinate was $180,000.00

           This is the first of five contracts for the construction of this
building, which has been estimated to cost $1,049,096. During the period of
the Fair, the building wjll be used for exhibits of the activities of the
various City Departments, Authorities and the Borouch President's
Offices. The New York City World's Fair Commission is at present planning the
arrangements of these exhibits and the Chairman of the Commission, General
George A. Wingate, will make this report public shortly.

           Following the Fair, the building will be converted to indoor
recreational usage and will be the dominant structure in the permanent park
layout.  It will house all types of indoor recreational activities, one of
which will be a large ice-skating rink.  The building is located on the major
axis of the main park area, between Horace Harding Boulevard and the Long
Island Railroad, and is directly adjacent to the east side of the Grand
Central Parkway Extension.  During the period of the Fair, it will face the
Perisphere and Trilon, which feature will dominate the center of activity of
the Fair.

           The next contract for this building, which will involve the
construction of the superstructure itself, will be let after authorization by
the Board of Estimate at its meeting Friday, May 28th.  The other contracts:
plumbing, electrical, and heating and ventilation will follow in rapid
sequence.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 25, 1937


                      The Marine Parkway Authority announces that the last
section of the new Marine Parkway Bridge, spanning Jamaica Inlet and
connecting Brooklyn to Queens, was placed on Monday afternoon, May 24th.  The
span, mounted on barges, was floated in position at flood tide. The receding
tide permitted the section to settle into place at 9 P.M. when the barges
floated clear.


                     Under a recent speeding up agreement with the American
Bridge Company, the schedule calls for the opening of the bridge on July 3rd,
12 months after it was started.

                     The bridge, which will replace the existing ferry line,
will be slightly more than 4000 feet long, with three 500 foot spans in the
center bridging the channel flanked by six shorter spans on either side. The
flanking spans will have a clearance of 50 feet above mean high water.  The
central section, the longest vertical highway lift span in the world, will be
55 feet above high water in its normal position and will raise an additional
95 feet to permit the passage of large vessels.

                     The bridge will make a connection between what is now
the end of Flatbush Avenue and Jacob Riis Park in Queens, and will not only
shorten the traveling time to the Rockaway Peninsula for many thousands of
motorists, but will relieve congestion that now exists on other arteries.

                      The reconstructed and expanded Jacob Riis Park will be
opened en June 23rd.  The facilities at the park will include areas for
pitch-and-putt golf, archery, shuffleboard, and other amusements similar to
those at Jones Beach, The existing bathhouse has been enlarged to provide
facilities for 10,000 persons and there will be parking facilities for 14,000
automobiles in the largest single unit paved parking space in the United
States.

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[PHOTO OF PLAYGROUND]

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{NOTE: Frederick G. R. Roth was paid by the WPA]

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 17, 1937


                Two bronze figures will be erected in the fountain basins at
the ends of the outdoor eating terrace of the concession restaurant building
in the Central Park Zoo.

                The figures, six feet high, representing a dancing bear and a
dancing goat, were cast by the Roman Bronze Works, Inc., and designed by
Frederick G. R. Roth, who executed the Sophie Irene Loeb Memorial fountain in
Heckscher Playground, and also many of the carved panels on the Zoo
buildings.

                These amusing and decorative figures set on granite blocks,
will, because of their position, fit harmoniously into and add gaiety to the
Zoo landscape.  Around the base of the bear are five frogs, and around the
goat five ducks, which are connected to the water system; and from the mouths
and bills of each, water will spray.

                                    -END-

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 12, 1937

                     The Marine Parkway Authority took bids today for the
construction of steel sheet pile bulkheading and incidental grading along the
Rockaway Inlet Shore of Jacob Riis Park, The new bulkheading extends eastward
approximately one-half mile from the Queens abutment of the Marine Parkway
Bridge.  At the easterly termination of this contract, the Borough President
of Queens will construct additional bulkheading, behind which fill will be
placed for the extension of Beach Channel Drive. The work under the present
contract is to be completed by August 14th.

                    The three lowest bidders were;

A. M. Hazell, Inc., 117 Liberty Street, New York City       $182,942.

Charles F. Vachris, Inc., 827 Remsen Ave., Bklyn., N.Y.      189,056.

Frederick Snare Corp,, 114 Liberty Street, New York City     212,590.

                    Alternate bids were taken on constructing only the
easterly two-thirds of this bulkhead, with the intervening space to the
bridge left in its present state. On this alternate, the three lowest bidders
were:

A. M. Hazell, Inc., 117 Liberty Street, New York City       $137,068.

Charles F. Vachris, Inc., 827 Remsen Ave., Bklyn.,N,Y.       141,685.

Allen N. Spooner & Son, Inc., Pier 11, North River,N,Y.C.    156,412.50

                                     END

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[PHOTO OF BRIDGE]

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[PHOTO OF BRIDGE]


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 12, 1937


                      Because of the layoff today of 429 WPA play leaders on
maintenance and operation of playground areas, 142 playgrounds have been
closed, and will remain closed until the City provides the funds for Civil
Service employes to take their places:

                      In Manhattan 66; in Brooklyn 23; in The Bronx 8; in
Queens 38 and in Richmond 7.

                      The removal of an additional 1571 WPA men on park
maintenance has resulted in the abandonment of maintenance, wholly or in
part, of 91 areas throughout the city.  It is hoped that the permanent Civil
Service personnel requested will be assigned before these areas are
completely destroyed.

                      41 of these areas are in Manhattan; 19 in Brooklyn; 13
in The Bronx; 12 in Queens and 6 in Richmond.

                      The Board of Estimate and Apportionment has been
requested to appropriate funds for the employment of 800 regular Civil
Service employes to take the place of the transferred part-time WPA
workers. The withdrawal of personnel and closing of play areas will be
reported to the Police Department to guard against vandalism and destruction
in the unprotected areas.

                      The transfer of still further WPA workers from park
construction projects has also resulted in the abandonment or curtailment of
construction on 26 partially completed projects:

                      11 of these are in Manhattan; 4 in Brooklyn; 8 in The
Bronx; 1 in Queens and 2 in Richmond.

                      Work has also been stopped en the erection of permanent
concrete benches to replace the worn out iron benches formerly used
throughout the system, rehabilitation of lawn areas and bridle paths and
miscellaneous repairs to older structures in the park system.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 11, 1937


             Bids were opened today in Albany by the State Department of
Public Works for the contract for paving Lawrence Street, Rodman Street and
Horace Harding Boulevard, a total length of two miles.  The engineers
estimate was $775,000.00.  The three lowest bidders were:

      Johnson, Drake & Piper, Inc.
       First National Bank Bldg., Freeport, L.I.            $714,784.04

      J.P. Burns
       Dumont, N ew Jersey                                   719,635.90

      Garofano Construction Co., Inc.
       Mount Yernon, New York                                722,085.00

             The contract plans were prepared by the Engineer of Highways,
Borough of Queens, from layout designs prepared by the Department of Parks.
This work follows the General Development plan for Flushing Meadow Park and
marginal roads.  The roadways are important traffic arteries and are
essential to the operation of the bus and passenger traffic during the Fair.
Horace Harding Boulevard is the main east-west artery between Northern
Boulevard and the Grand Central Parkway and will carry large volumes of
traffic from the north and south marginal roads. Horace Harding Boulevard has
been realigned through the park so as to eliminate sharp curves existing in
the present road which will be used as a detour during the construction of
the new roadway.

             Upon completion of the road, the present Strong's Causeway will
become part of the park area.  The construction of this roadway will be
carried on concurrently with three major projects in this area: (l)
Construction of the Boulevard bridge over the Flushing River, which is being
built under the direction of the New York State Department of Public Works by
Chas. F. Vachris, Inc.; (2) The pedestrian overpass over Horace Harding
Boulevard.  This is to be built by the World's Fair and will connect the
State Amphitheatre with the Theme Building.  The center portion of this
structure will remain after the Fair.  During the Fair, a temporary structure
will be built as part of the bridge to carry buses in addition to pedestrian
traffic; (3) The construction of a 43" water main in the line of the present
Strong's Causeway.  This work is being done under the direction of the
Department of Water Supply, Gas & Electricity by Oak Hill Construction
Company.

           Lawrence and Rodman Streets, forming the easterly boundary of the
nain portion of the park, will be paved with bituminous nacadara and willhave
a 24-foot roadway next to the park, a 30-foot central mall containing the
trolley tracks, and an outer roadway 32 feet wide.

           The portion of Corona Avenue to be paved under this contract will
connect Horace Harding Boulevard with 111th Street, which forms the west
boundary of the main portion of the park.

           This work will tie in the access roads from the Grand Central
Parkway Extension and will complete the traffic cloverleaf at this
point.

           This is the second of seven contracts to be let by the State
Department of Public Works with funds appropriated this year for construction
of basic traffic facilities needed for the development of Flushing Meadow
Park, and to handle the crowds expected at the Fair. Out of seven similar
contracts let last year, two have been completed and the other five are xvell
under way and will be completed this summer.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 10, 1937


                       The Department of parks took bids this afternoon for
grading and paving roads and parking spaces on Randall's Island, together
with incidental drainage structures, topsoiling, irrigation and fencing.

                       This is the first of a series of contracts to
supplement the bulk of the work rn Randall's Island, including the Stadium
and cafeteria being completed by relief forces. It is also the first contract
to be let in the 1937 Capital Outlay Budget of the Park Department, and is
the first unit in a $3,000,000 program being financed from this source.  In
order to make the Stadium accessible last year, temporary roads on freshly
deposited fill were laid by the Triborough Bridge Authority.  The fill having
settled satisfactory, permanent pavement can now be placed safely. Subsequent
contracts will provide a lighting system and complete the landscaping of the
Island.

                        The three lowest bidders are:

                 1. J. Leopold & Co. Inc.              $ 297,671.25
                    60 East 42nd Street
                    New York City

                 2. Elmhurst Contracting Co. Inc.        315,412.75
                    5304 - 97th Place
                    Corona, Long Island

                 3. B. Turecamo Contracting Co.          316,366.75
                    New Cropsey Lane
                    Brooklyn, New The

                    The engineer's estimate was         $376,537.00

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 7, 1937


                Coincident with Arbor Day, the Park Department announces that
19,000 trees and 468,400 shrubs will be planted this year throughout
the city park and parkway system.

                Not many people realize the volume of work performed by the
forestry section of the Park Department, in caring for 1,195,671 woodland
park and parkway trees occupying 2,815 acres and 977,750 street trees which
shade our parks and streets throughout Greater New York.  Many wooded and
planted arena,in which little or no forestry work had been done in the past,
have been, through modern silviculture, transformed into sections of
park-like appearance and are now maintained on a normal basis, thereby
permitting requests for the care of trees received from citizens and other
sources to be handled with more promptness and precision than heretofore.

                For the past several years requests from citizens to have
work done on trees have become so numerous that, at the present time, they
require a great volume of work.  In 1936, 30,169 requests were received, of
which 27,904 were inspected and taken care of, in addition to the routine
forestry work.

                The pruning of trees constitutes the major operation of the
forestry section and is carried on continuously throughout the year.  During
the past year, 136,393 street and park trees wore pruned - an increase of
40,025 over the previous year.

                4,552 trees barked by automobiles, horses and vandals were
cared for.  18,662 trees with cavity work and old wounds in a bad state of
decay were attended to. On the new parkways and playgrounds, 17,990 new trees
were staked, guyed and braced to prevent than from being dislodged, blown
over and uprooted by vandals, storms or high winds.  Over 5,000
undernourished trees were fertilized, using approximately 48 tons of
material.

                Due to storm damage and general clean-up of dead, diseased
and undesirable trees, 21,473 trees wore removed.

                The control of insect posts and fungi diseases in one of the
forestry section's important functions and a major operation.  In controlling
the Tent Caterpillar, Japoneao Beetle, Tussock and Gypsy Moth, the Dutch Elm
disease and other pests, the department used 3,049,015 gallons of spray
solution in treating 483,354 trees and 393,683 shrubs and plants.  Much more
spraying could have been accomplished if additional adequate equipment had
been available.  Spraying activities oontinue throughout the year except in
extreme cold weather.  During June, July and August, the lack of equipment
necessitated working spray crews in two shifts, starting at 4:30 in the
morning and working until 8:30 P.M.  Considerable time was lost in having
worn-out and obsolete equipment laid up for repairs.  Two new spray machines
were purchased and used in 1936, and four more will be available for use this
year.

            The City Park Department, in cooperation with the State
Conservation Department, made considerable progress in checking the advance
of the Gypsy Moth in The Bronx, where heavy infestations were found within
the city limits.  In this area a systematic inspection of all shade, fruit
and wodland trees and also shrubbery was made for Gypsy Moth egg masses
which, after being located, were destroyed.

            Considerable headway was made in controlling the spread of the
Dutch Elm disease by the removal and burning of 230 trees end stumps.  The
progress made in stamping out this disease is gratifying when one realizes
that these represented one-third of the number found in 1935, and only
one-sixth of those discovered in 1934.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 7, 1937


             The Park Department announces that the Mary Harrisan Rumsey
Flayground in Central Park, on the site of the old Casino, is oompleted and
will be opened to the public Friday, May 7th, without formal ceremony,
although later this month a cast bronze plaque, now in place, will be
unveiled by the Harriman fanily and interested friends, in raenory of Mrs.
Rumsey who, as a philanthropist, was enthusiastically interested in child
welfare.

             After a legal oonflict which started shortly after Commissioner
Moses took of office in January, 1934, the city gained on May 2st, 1936, an
unanimous victory in the Appellate Division of the Suprene Court on the
question of the Park Departnent's right to remove, for purposes of other
park development, buildings whioh has been erected solely as incidental to
park use.  Immediately, W. P. A., workmen started to tear down the old
Casino, formerly an exclusive hiph-priced restaurant and nicht-club set
aside for a few people of wealth, and of no use to the general public.

             This one and one-quarter acre area occupied by the Casino
building and its parking space, now offers facilities for a juvenile age
group not provided for in the marginal play-grounds for small children
located around the perimeter of Central Park and marks another step in
setting aside active play space within the park to insure to older people
the enjoyment of nearby spaces for quiet and relaxation.  Besides swings,
slides end other play equipment, a large oval-shaped wading pool has been
constructed.  Encircling it is a roller-skating track, around whose outer
edgo are pemanent benches under shade trees for guardians of children and
for children to adjust their skates.  Comfort facilities for boys and girls,
separated by a latticed open shelter, are incorporated in a brick building
of Georgian architecture.  The entire area, including paths and landscaping,
was designed to connect and fit the playground to existing surrounding park
features.

                                     End

CENTRAL PARK CASINO:

         Closed - February 25, 1936
         Court Order to condemn building - May 1, 1936
         Demolition started - May 6, 1936

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 3, 1937


             Hereafter all regular employes paid on a five day or six day
limit per week will be paid in full on rainy days but hourly seasonal
employes on revenue producing facilities will be paid only for hours of
actual needed work.  The Park Department is grossly undermanned and I have
repeatedly complained about this.  Our greatly expanded facilities are being
used to capacity and we lack the force to maintain and protect property and
people, police protection in the parks is a joke.  The Police Commissioner
does not have enough men for his own work.  I have agreed to change the
recent ruling as to regular per diem men because it may work too great a
hardship in their case, but the fact is that the public should come first and
that the city should decide whether to keep up the playgrounds, parks and
parkways or give them up. Personally, I have been consistently in favor of a
per annum salary for our regular men.

                                   ROBERT MOSES

                                     COMMISSIONER

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                                                                  May 1, 1937


           To be phoned to City News for immediate release: -

           A goup of students the College of Architecture of Cornell
University are making this a week-end study of landscaped properties and
facilities in the New York City park system.

           The group under the guidance of City park executives will visit
Central Park, West Side Improvement, Fort Tryon Park, Henry Hudson Parkway,
Triborough Bridge, Astoria and Hamilton Fish Swimming Pools, Flushing Meadow
Park, the future site of the New York World's Fair 1939, Inc., and also many
other park property in the various boroughs.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    May 2, 1937

              Last fall the Park Department, as part of its horticultural
program, bedded 115,000 Tulip bulbs at various locations throughout the city.

             The most intensive bedding was in the five center malls on
Mt. Eden Avenue from Walton to Weeks Avenues.  Here 15,860 double early
bedding Tulips of the varieties Couronne D'or, Mr. Van Tubergen and Orange
Nassau, ranging in color from orange-red to cream-yellow provide a central
motive in a formerly barren area.  The five blocks have been rehabilitated to
form a series of turn panels enclosing geometrically arranged flower beds and
encircled by broad walks around the edges of which have been placed permanent
concrete benches with shade trees at their backs.  The early tulips now in
blossom will be at their height on Sunday.

             Other tulip beds are located in the Bronx at Pelham Parkway, the
Colonial Gardens in Yan Cortlandt Park, and on Claremont Parkway.  In
Manhattan tulips have been set in City Hall, Foley Souare, Union Square,
Washington Square, Dyckman House, and Carl Schurz Parks, in the Plaza at 59th
Street and Fifth Avenue, and around the Seal Pool in the Zoo in Central Park;
in Queens there will be a display in King Park, Jackson Heights Playground,,
and Buddy Monument at 108th Street and Myrtle Avenue; while in Brooklyn -
Columbia Heights, Brower and Prospect Parks; and in Richmond, at the Cloves
Lake Field House in Cloves Lake Park, there are further displays.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 30, 1937


                  The Department of Parks announces that the Tavern-On-The
Green and Claremont Restaurant will reopen on May 1st.

                  The Tavern, formerly the old Central Park Sheepfold,
located on the west side of Central Park opposite 67th Street, remodeled and
opened to the public as a popular priced restaurant in 1934, has been
entirely redecorated. New equipment has been provided in the kitchens and
dining rooms. It will be operated this year by the Savarins Management Inc.,
who also operate restaurants in the Waldorf Astoria, the Equitable Building,
the New York Life Building and Pennsylvania Railroad stations in New York,
Philadelphia, Washington and Pittsburgh.  The Tavern will open at 7:30 in
the morning, when a canter breakfast will be served for equestrians and
other early visitors to the park.  Breakfast will be from 50 cts. up,
luncheon 85 cts. and up, and dinner $1.35 and up; or one may eat a-la-carte.

                  The historic Claremont was built in 1806, and is recognized
as one of New York's landmarks, overlooking the Hudson River on Riverside
Drive north of Grant's Tomb.  The exterior has been repainted and the
interior has been renovated. It will open on May 1st at 6:30 P.M., for
dinner. A new cocktail bar has been provided and the indoor seating capacity
increased, considerably. Luncheon will be $1.00, dinner $1.50, special supper
$1.00, and breakfast on Sundays until 1 P.M., 50 cts. and up.

                  At both locations tree-shaded outdoor dining terraces,
with their gay sun umbrellas, will be much more attractive than in
former years. The trees and flowering shrubs planted three years ago
are now fully established and will soon be blooming profusely.  Entertainment
in the form of music and dancing will be provided nightly.

                                   *******

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 29, 1937

            The Park Department announces that the Split Rock Golf Course
located at Split Rock Boad and Shore Boad, The Bronx, will open to the public
on Saturday, May 1, 1937, at 6:00 A. M.

            Playing conditions hare been improved considerably due to
rehabilitation work during the winter with relief forces under the
supervision of the Department of Parks.

                                    #####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 28, 1937


                The Department of Parks announces that it will conduct the
second annual Opportunity Contest for Amateur Musicians. The contest will be
open to both junior and senior musicians and will be held on the Mall,
Central Park, during the month of June.

               Any boy or girl in the five boroughs who hasn't reached his
17th birthday is eligible to enter the junior division which is divided into
three age groups; 6th thru 9th year, 10th thru 13th year, 14th thru 16th
year. Playground and district eliminations will be conducted prior to the
borough eliminations which will be held on Saturday, May 29th, at 2:30 P.M.,
at Roosevelt Playground, Manhattan; Mullaly Playground, Bronx; Forest Park,
Queens; and on June ?th at 8;30 H^VL at Silver Lake Park, Richmond. The four
best musicians will be chosen from each age group to represent the borough at
the semi-finals. The final contest will take place on the Mall, June 19th, at
2:30 P.M.

               All other contestants over 16 years of age are eligible to
enter the senior division. With the exception of Manhattan, where the borough
finals will be held on the Mall, Central Park, the borough eliminations will
be conducted at the same locaT tions mentioned above at 8:30 P.M. on the
following days;. Tuesday,. June 1, Manhattan and The Bronx; Thursday, June 3,
Brooklyn and Richmond; Monday, June 7, Richmond.  At this time the five best
musicians will be selected to represent the borough at the city-wide final
contest on the Mall on June 10 at 8:30 P.M.

               Each contestant will be permitted one solo which rendition
must be completed within five minutes. Any type of music may be played. The
basis of rating-by the judges will consist of tone, technique and rythm 60%,
execution 30%, type of selection 05%, appearance (position considered)
05%. Contestants may register in any of the following groups:

                       A. Piano
                       B. Violin, viola, cello, basso
                       C. Banjo, mandolin, guitar, ukelele, zither
                       D. Trumpet, trombone, French horn, tuba,
                             mellophone (alto) bugle
                       E. Clarinet, oboe, flute, bassoon, fife,
                             saxophone, English horn
                       F. Xylophone, drums
                       G. Harp
                       H. Accordians
                       I. Bagpipes, one man bands
                       J. Miscellaneous

                Suitable prizes will be awarded to the winners. Entry blanks
may be secured from playground directors or by applying to the borough
offices of the Department of Parks.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 27, 1937


           Bids were opened in Albany today by the State Department of Public
Works for a contract for paving the Hutchinson River Parkway Extension in
Pelham Bay Park.

          Of 9 bids received the three lowest were:


          Rusciano & Sons Corp., 728 East 212th St.,New York City   $ 329,229.

          Tuckahrte Construction Co.,Inc., Tuckahoe, N.Y.             353,050.

          Bronx Water Works Corp., 1 Riverdale Ave.,New York City     358,080.

          The engineer's estimate was $401,669.50.

          The contract provides for paving four lanes of parkway from its
present terminus at the Boston Post Road at the Westchester County Line and
Eastern Boulevard at Bartow Station; also for the construction of a temporary
macadam roadway from the latter point to the East Chester Croek Bridge for
northbound traffic only. Details of the contract include grading, paving in
concrete and macadam, construction of curbs and culverts, topsoiling,
installation of drainage, guard rails, traffic markers, etc.

          The Department of Plant and Structures will let contracts during
May for the widening of the Eastchester Creek Bridge, and the Borough
President of the Bronx is now engaged in widoning and paving Eastern
Boulevard between the Pelham Bay Terminus of the I. R. T. Subway and
Middletown Road.  When all these projects are completed through communication
between the Triborough Bridge and the Hutchinson River Parkway in Westchester
County will be established.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 27, 1937


                The Department of Parks announces that due to weather
conditions the Split Rock Golf Course in Pelham Bay Park, The Bronx, is
unplayable and will not he open until Saturday, May 1st.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 20, 1937


            Bids were opened today in Albany by the State Department of
Public Works on a contract for paving and trolley track relocation of the
main artery crossing Flushing Meadow Park along Horace Harding Boulevard,
Lawrence and Rodman Streets, and Corona Avenue.

            The three lowest bidders were:


            Johnson, Drake & Piper, Freeport L.I.         $ 298,703.50

            J. P. Burns, Dumont, IT.J.                      318,185.50

            The Iranick Construction Co., Teriden, Conn.    322,755.20


            This contract was prepared, in accordance with the City Park
Department's basic scheme for the development of Flushing Meadow Park, by the
Engineer of Highways, Borough of Queens.  It is one of the most important
paving jobs in connection with the improvement of Flushing Meadow Park, the
site of the 1939 World's Fair.

            The portion of Horace Harding Boulevard passing through the park
will be paved with concrete on a new alignment connecting the existing bridge
over Grand Central Parkway Extension and the new bridge over the Flushing
River, now under construction. Strong's Causeway, the present route through
the park, will be abandoned and will become a part of the park. There will be
two 44 foot widths of pavement, separated by a 10 foot island and a wrought
iron fence to discourage pedestrian crossing except at properly protected
places.  East and west-bound trolley tracks of the Corona Avenue line pass
through the park on Horace Harding Boulevard and new tracks will be laid
along with the new pavement.

            Lawrence and Rodman Streets, forming the easterly boundary of the
main portion of the park, will be paved with bituminous macadam and will have
a 24 foot roadway next to the park, a 30 foot central mall containing the
trolley tracks, and an outer roadway 32 feet wide.

            The portion of Corona Avenue to be paved under this contract will
connect Horace Harding Boulevard with 111th Street, which forms the west
boundary of the main portion of the park.

            This is the first contract out of seven to be let by the State
Department of Public Works with funds appropriated this year for construction
of basic traffic facilities needed for the development of Flushing Meadow
Park, and to handle the crowds expected at the Fair.  Out of seven similar
contracts let last year, two have been completed and the other five are well
under way and will be completed this summer.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 20, 1937


              A hearing before the Committee of the United States Senate on
Commerce will be held Wednesday morning at 10:30 in the Capitol.  The
Committee is considering the Federal bill, introduced by Senator Copeland,
for the authorization of $2,500,000 for improvements to Flushing Bay at the
north end of Flushing Meadow Park.  It is proposed that this money be devoted
to dredging, bulkheading and the erection of a monunental watergate at the
boat basin which is now under construction by the State Department of Public
Works.

              Grover A. Whalen, President of the World's Fair Corporation,
will present the plans for the inprovenents.  Aiding him will be the members
of the Committee on Basic Improvenents of Flushing Meadow Park, a group of
City and State officials charged with the coordination and progress of the
various governmental agencies involved in its construction.  Representatives
of commercial and shipping interests, as well as proponents of pleasure
boating facilities, will also be present.

                                     End

Attached:
Report on Inprovement
of Flushing Bay

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 19, 1937


               The Department of Parks announces that the winter and spring
use of the play centers inaugurated September 24th last year terminated
yesterday so that the areas can be cleaned, painted and generally prepared
for the coming swimming season. The swimming pools will re-open to the public
10 A.M.  Saturday, May 29th. Children under 14 years of age will be admitted
free from 10 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. every day except Saturdays, Sundays and
holidays. After 1 P.M. children under 14 years of age will be admitted for
ten cents and all others for twenty cents.

               2,021,100 children and adults have made use of the facilities
offered since the close of last year's swimming season.  In the pool areas
handball, shuffle board, paddle tennis, basket ball, volley ball and various
group games were provided for.  During the winter when the weather was too
cold, the activities were moved into the buildings where social dancing and
calisthenics were conducted besides ping pong, checkers, quoits and other
quiet games.  These games were at all times under the competent supervision
of men trained to instruct in and conduct the activities.

               Tournaments were arranged in the various sports and team and
individual winners were selected to compete in city-wide championships. The
boys' basket ball play center championship was won by a team from Astoria and
the girls' basket ball championship by a team representing Crotona.
Individual handball championships were won by members of the Highbridge team.
Girls from the Red Hook Play Center won five of their eight matches and the
girls from Sunset won the other three. Checkers proved an attraction,
especially among older men, with groups of 50 participating daily.

                                #   #   #   #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 17, 1937


             The Department of Parks announces the opening today of two new
playgrounds, two new park buildings and two remodeled park areas.

             In Manhattan at 63rd Street and York Avenues, the new Rockefeller
Playground which was acquired on permit from the Rockefeller Institute for
Medical Research, is equipped with garden swings, play houses, sand box and
benches with shade tree3.

             At West 45th Street, just east of Tenth Avenue, the new
playground has see-saws, swings, jungle gym, garden swings, slides, sand
tables, play houses and game tables for chess, checkers and backgammon, and
also benches and shade trees.

             In Stuyvesant Park, Second Avenue, between 15th and 17th
Streets, the northwest section of the park has been rehabilitated. This is a
passive recreational area, and around its two semi-circular walks there are
continuous rows of permanent concrete benches. Also in Stuyvesant Park in the
south end of the section west of Second Avenue the octagonal shaped brick
comfort station opened temporarily for public use last summer is entirely
completed and reopened.

             In Brooklyn, in the playground at New Utrecht Avenue and 70th
Street, the new brick recreation building is of octagonal design with
rectangular wings and houses comfort facilities for boys and girls, a
mother's room and a large play room for indoor dressing in inclement weather.

             In Queens, at 214th Place and 35th Avenue, Crocheron Park has
been completely redesigned and reconstructed.  The entire 44 acres have been
regraded and landscaped.  New walks, benches, drainage and irrigation systems
have been installed.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 16, 1937


             The Marine Parkway Authority announces the receipt of estimates
today for the completion of the grading and paving in Jacob Riis Park,
Queens.

             This contract will connect the traffic circle at the Rockaway
terminus of the Marine Parkway Bridge with Washington Avenue at the southeast
corner of the Park, and will also connect with the extension of Beach Channel
Drive which is to be constructed by the Borough President of Queens.

             The three lowest bids received were:

             1. Good Koads Sag. & Contracting Co..
                       Wantagh, L.I.                    $176,469.00

             2. Woodcrest Construction Co.,
                       415 Lexington Ave., N Y City      176,796.00

             3. The Immick Co.. Inc.
                       Meriden, Conn.                    180,095.00

             The Engineer's estimate was                 $189,000.00

             The work being done in Jacob Hiis Park will be completely
finished upon the opening of the Marine Parkway Bridge on July 3, 1937.

                                     End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 15, 1937

                  The Department of Parks announces the opening of nine of
the ten golf courses under its jurisdiction on Saturday norning, April 17th
at 6 A.M.  Due to weather conditions, the opening of Split Rock Golf Course
will be deferred to April 24th, weather permitting, as play at this tine
would be very detrimental to the future use of this course.

                  The new club houses at Dyker Beach and Silver Lake Golf
Courses are not as yet completed and temporary arrangenents have been made at
these two courses to accommodate golfers.

                  Fees will be the same as last year, $10 for a season
permit, $5 for a limited permit good from Monday to Friday exclusive of
holidays, $3 for a junior limited permit good from Monday to Friday exclusive
of holidays.  Daily fees are $.75 from Monday to Friday and $1.00 on
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.  Reservations may be made at the following
borough offices, for starting time on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

       Bronx      - Zabrowski Mansion, Claremont Park     -   Tremont   2-5400
       Brooklyn   - Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park     -   South     8-2300
       Queens     - Overlook, Forest Park, Eew Gardens    -   Cleveland 3-4600
       Richmond   - Field House, Clove Lakes Park         -   Gibraltar 2-7640


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 14, 1937


                  ANNOUNCEMENTS AS TO WEST SIDE IMPROVEMENT
                         AND MARINE PARKWAY OPENINGS

         The West Side Improvement from 72nd street to Dyckman Street will be
completed next fall.  The Express Highway will not be opened in sections
during the summer because this would interfere with park reconstruction work
and would simply create serious traffic congestion at such entrances as at
79th and 96th Streets. The entire Express Parkway will be opened to traffic
from 72nd to Dyckman Street in September.

          Almost all of the reconstructed Riverside and Fort Washington Parks
will be opened to the public on or before the opening of the Parkway, but
considerable landscaping and cleanup work will have to be done during the
remainder of the fall.  The new upper level of the Henry Hudson Bridge,
including an additional bridge over Dyckman Street and wider approaches, will
be completed in the late fall.

           It will be necessary for the public to be patient during the
summer with conditions along Riverside Drive because most of the area will be
torn up and work will be proceeding at top speed on many contracts.

           As to the Marine Parkway Authority and the new lift bridge over
Jamaica Islet, connecting Brooklyn and Queens and the improvements at Jacob
Riis Park, these will be available to the public during the present
summer. Under a recent speeding up agreement with the American Bridge
Company, the new bridge, originally scheduled for opening on August 1, will
open on Saturday, July 3 at noon. While a good deal of work will remain to be
completed on that date, the bridge will be opened to traffic and will afford
access to Jacob Riis Park and the Rockaways from Brooklyn.  This schedule
calls for the opening of the bridge thirteen months after it was started,
which is believed to be a record for this kind of construction.  The toll
charge for passenger automobiles on the Marine Parkway will be fifteen
cents. There will be no charge for pedestrians.  Truck charges will be from
twenty-five cents up. Buses, excepting those operating on a regular schedule
under permit and franchise, will be charged fifty cents for the use of the
bridge.

                                  /s/   ROBERT MOSES
                                        Commissioner

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[PICTURE OF BRIDGE]

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[PICTURE OF BRIDGE]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 9, 1937


            The Department of Parks announces the opening of a new recreation
building in St. James Park at Jerome Avenue and 191st Street, The Bronx.

            The opening of this building marks the completion of the redesign
of this eleven and one-half acre park, the reconstruction of which began in
1935.

            The building is constructed of brick with a slate roof and
provides men's and women's comfort station facilities, a mother's room and a
large play room for indoor games during inclement weather.

            The twelve earth surfaced tennis courts, which were formerly in
the park, have been resurfaced, eight with clay and four with asphalt,
thereby providing longer periods of play during the early spring and late
fall when alternating periods of freeze and thaw ordinarily render clay
courts unusable.  During sub-freezing temperatures the asphalt courts are
also flooded for ice-skating.  One hundred and eighty-nine new concrete
benches have been installed, four thousand new trees and shrubs planted and
seven new concrete drinking fountains installed, all fitting into a
comprehensive landscape scheme.

            The old frame maintenance sheds for the storage of tools have
been removed and the old comfort station will be demolished next week.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[PHOTOS OF NEW RECREATION BUILDING]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
[NOTE: Karl Heinrich Gruppe was Chief Sculptor of the Monument
 Restoration Project of the NYC Parks Department 1934-37, which was
 supported by the WPA.  Reference:
http://www.nycgovparks.org/art-and-antiquities/permanent-art-and-monuments/vintage-film-gruppe-1934-37 ]

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 11, 1937


                The Henry Hudson Memorial Column which stands as a landmarker
in Spuyten Duyvil, opposite 227th Street, was dedicated by Governor Charles
Evans Hughes during the Hudson-Fulton celebration in 1909. It had been
intended to surmount the Doric shaft with a bronze statue of Henry Hudson.
Plans had advanced to the stage of having a model made by Karl Bitter, M.A.,
the eminent sculptor, who died in 1915.  In an endeavor to raise funds for
the statue, its plaster cast was placed on display in the lobby of the Hotel
Astor. Considerable comment was caused at the time by the disappearance of
the model from its place of exhibition.

             Park Commissioner Robert Moses, Sole Member of the Henry Hudson
Parkway Authority, announces that the Authority will furnish the statue and
he has retained Karl H. Gruppe, who for years was associated with Mr. Bitter,
to undertake the reproduction of the original design. Fortunately, the
sculptor's widow, who resides at 209 East 72nd Street, has a photograph of
the original model and it will be used as a basis for the reproduction.

              The statue will be completed at the time of the completion of
the widening of the Henry Hudson Parkway and the double-decking of the
existing bridge over the Harlem Ship Canal.

              The shaft extends 100 feet from the ground and the statue will
be 16 feet in height.  It will represent the famous navigator and explorer
clad in rough sea-going garments over which he wears a loose sheepskin
jerkin. He stands erect, with one hand readily near the hilt of his sword,
gazing out over his river.

              The north and south faces of the shaft contain recesses
intended for bronze bas-reliefs, which were to have been executed by
H.M. Shrady, A.M.A. These bas-reliefs, each 7'2" x 9'6", will also be
designed and executed by Mr. Gruppe.  Mr. Gruppe has been in charge of the
monument restoration projects of the Park Department since early 1934 and has
superintended the rehabilitation of many of the City's monuments since that
time, notable among these projects have been the Maine Memorial and the
Columbus Monument at Columbus Circle, the Seventh Regiment Monument at Fifth
Avenue [NOW IT'S ON THE WEST SIDE] and 67th Street, the Joan of Arc Statue
on Riverside Drive, and the restoration of the Wynn Memorial Fountain in
Williamsburg, Brooklyn. At the present time, he is superintending the
reproduction of the famous St. Gaudens bas-relief which forms part of the
base of the Admiral Farragut Monument in Madison Square Park.

              Additional land is being acquired in the vicinity of the statue
to form a memorial park to the late Bernard S. Deutsch, and plans have been
prepared to enclose the entire plot with an ornamental wrought iron fence in
which a memorial gateway to the late Aldermanic President will be set at West
227th Street, opposite [DOCUMENT ENDS HERE]


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[NOTE: Tavern On The Green was created by relief workers, see 29 Oct 1934 PR]

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 3, 1937


                        The Department of Parks announces the opening of
four new and one remodeled recreation buildings and a new playground on April
3rd, as well as the completion of alterations of the Tavern-On-The-Green in
Central Park and the Claremont Inn on Riverside Drive. The two restaurants
will be opened in early May.

                        In Manhattan a new recreation building has been
completed at Jay Hood Wright Park, Fort Washington Avenue and 174th
Street. It is of granite construction with slate roof, the central section is
of octagonal shape connected to rectangular wings by semi-circular loggias;
the building contains a comfort station for men and women, a mother's room, a
large play-room and a director's room.

                        In Brooklyn, at Union Street, between Van Brunt
Street and Hamilton Avenue, a new brick building has comfort station
facilities for boys and girls and a large play-room. The old building at Red
Hook playground at Pioneer and Richard Streets, has been completely renovated
and has modern comfort station facilities for boys and girls as well as a
play-room for indoor games.

                        In Queens a new playground has been constructed at
135th Street and Lincoln Street.  It has been equipped with swings, see-saws,
slides, sand tables, play-houses and a wading pool for small children.
Handball, shuffleboard and table tennis courts, a large pl~y area with a soft
ball diamond and an oval roller skating track has been constructed for older
boys and girls.

                        In the Newtown Elmhurst section, at 92nd Street and
56th Avenue, a new recreation building of brick construction is ready for use
by the public.  It contains a boys and girls' comfort station, a mother's
room and play-room.

                        At Crocheron Park, 33rd Avenue and 215th Place the
new building has a comfort station, a large lounge, locker rooms and shower
baths.

                        The Tavern-On-The Green, at Central Park West and
66th Street will be under new management this season.  It will be operated
under the direction of the Savarins Management Inc.  The Tavern has been
entirely renovated and will accommodate 450 persons for table service,
provided by waitresses who will supplant the waiters used last year.

                         A canter breakfast will be served each morning for
equestrians using the bridle paths beginning at 8 A.M., and special
provisions will be made for afternoon tea from 3 P.M. to 5 P.M.  Liquid
refreshments may be secured at the standup bar and will also be served at the
tables.

                         Claremont Inn on Riverside Drive will again be
operated under the direction of the Riverside-Claremont Inc.  The structure
has been completely redecorated and will provide greater seating capacity.
Breakfast, luncheon, tea, dinner and late suppers will be served.  An
orchestra for dancing will be provided in the evenings.

                                     END

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[PHOTOS OF TAVERN ON THE GREEN AND CLAREMONT INN]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[PHOTOS OF CARS AT TOLL BOOTHS]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                 WEST SIDE IMPROVEMENT - M-71
72nd St. to St. Clair Pl.

Section  Date                 Cal. No.      Amount

   1     February 7, 1936         18       $   279,000

   2     February 5, 1937         41           179,000

   3     February 7, 1936         18           957,000

   4     June 19, 1936           181         1,924,000

   5     April 3, 1936            71         2,201,000

   6     August 26, 1936          11         2,231,000  

   7     June 19, 1936           180         1,453,000

   8     January 16, 1937        103         1,776,000
                                           -----------
                                           $11,000,000

St. Clair Pl. to Henry Hudson Pkway. at Dyckman St.

Section  Date                 Cal. No.      Amount

   9     December 4, 1936         36       $ 2,190,000

  10     December 4, 1936         36           220,000

  11     February 5, 1937         41           860,000

  12     December 4, 1936         36         1,050,000

  13     July 15, 1936             4           800,000  (Engineering)
                        
  13     February 5, 1937         41         1,880,000
                                           -----------
                                           $ 7,000,000

                                                             February 8, 1937

72nd St. to St. Clair Pl.

Section 1  $   279,000     February 7, 1936   Cal. #18     P. 455

Section 2      179,000     February 5, 1937   Cal. #41     

Section 3      957,000     February 7, 1936   Cal. #18     P. 455

Section 4    1,924,000     June 19, 1936      Cal. #181    P. 3011

Section 5    2,201,000     April 3, 1936      Cal. #71     P. 1455

Section 6    2,231,000     August 26, 1936    Cal. #11     P. 3565

Section 7    1,453,000     June 19, 1936      Cal. #180    P. 3010

Section 8    1,776,000     January 15, 1937   Cal. #103
           -----------
           $11,000,000

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Page 32

8/3/37   - 611 - Bids opened for paving and drainage of East service road in
                 Flushing Meadow Park from Long Island Railroad to Boat
                 Basin on Flushing Bay. 

8/3/37   - 612 - Bids received for superstructure, plumbing, heating,
                 ventilating & electrical contracts for the city buildings,
                 World's Fair. 

8/4/37   - 613 - Commissioner announced fireworks display at Jacob Riis Park
                 every Friday evening throughout August. 

8/9/37   - 614 - Park Commissioner asks that locked school recreation
                 facilities be opened to the public.

8/9/37   - 615 - Hillbilly musical contest.  Listing of parks where held.

8/11/37  - 616 - Third anniversary of model playgrounds - listing of locations

8/16/37  - 617 - Announcement of wading pool activities throughout
                 playground systems to take place August 17th. 

8/22/37  - 618 - Schedule of eliminations for the barber shop quartet contest.

8/6/37   - 619 - Next steps in City Parks Program by Robert Moses.
                 (Interview, Evening Journal)
                 
8/12/37  - 620 - Finals for 1937 golf championship, La Tourette Golf Course.

8/17/37  - 621 - Moving of Bronx Administrative Office to new administration
                 building at Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue, Bronx Park.

8/17/37  - 622 - Bids taken bulkheading along South Shore of Flushing Bay.

8/17/37  - 623 - Helen Hamchuck, two millionth person to make use of
                 facilities at twelve municipally operated swimming pools.

8/17/37  - 624 - Second annual city-wide diving and swimming championship
                 contest at Astoria Pool, August 20th.

8/17/37  - 625 - Letter of Commissioner to Interstate Sanitation Commission
                 on development of waterfront areas. 

8/23/37  - 626 - Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announces that bids were
                 taken today on paving the new upper level northbound
                 approach from Dyckman Street to Henry Hudson Bridge; contract
                 being part of widening program, andt also includes upper
                 deck on Henry Hudson Bridge.

8/24/37  - 627 - Finals of Harmonica Contest on Mall, August 25th

8/24/37  - 628 - Memorandum on 1938 Budget Request, August 24th, 1937,
                 signed by Commissioner Moses. 

8/25/37  - 629 - Police protection needs to be increased in City Parks to
                 prevent crime and vandalism.

8/25/37  - 630 - Letter to Herald Tribune, replying to article which had
                 appeared regarding controversy between the Board of
                 Education and Commissioner Moses on play areas.

8/26/37  - 631 - Finals of children's amateur singing contest on Friday,
                 August 27th on Mall, Central Park.

8/27/37  - 632 - 4,000,000th car passed over Henry Hudson Bridge... Traffic
                 so heavy that second bond issue has been made to build
                 upper deck...

9/3/37   - 633 - Finals of Hill Billy Contest on Mall, Central Park,
                 September 8th.

9/8/37   - 634 - Letter to Interstate gssmsrs Sanitation Commission on
                 pollution of various areas.

9/10/37  - 635 - Informal opening of new playground at 30th Road between
                 45th & 46th Streets, Astoria, making total of 236
                 playgrounds added to recreational system...

9/10/37  - 636 - Official opening of new Williamsbridge Reservoir Plgrd,
                 208th Street & Bainbridge Avenue, Bronx. Parade, games,
                 dances, track events and speeches.

9/11/37  - 637 - Barber Shop Quartet Contest, Randall's Island, Sunday,
                 September 12th. Announcement, nzmes of participants and
                 prizes.

9/ll/37  - 638 - Closing of swimming pools and beaches.   Conversion of
                 swimming pools into active play areas and reopening as
                 such, September 18th.

9/16/37  - 639 - Letter of Commissioner Moses, which accompanied tickets for
                 Arsenal Grandstand on Legionnaires' Day.

9/17/37  - 640 - Announcement of opening of Horace Harding Blvd.

9/17/37  - 641 - Announcement of formal opening of Conservatory Gardens in
                 Central Park on September 18th.

9/17/37  - 642 - Reviewing stand for legion parade. Erection.

9/20/37  - 643 - Letter to Interstate Sanitation Commission from R. Moses,
                 calling attention to park development from Palisades
                 Interstate Park south to the Narrows. Projects bordering
                 along these waters.

9/23/37  - 644 - Letter to Benjamin Schiffeldrin, in reference to salaries
                 of playground directors. From R. Moses.

9/27/37  - 645 - Report on revenue producing facilities, resume of years
                 1934 to 1937.

9/28/37  - 646 - Bids opened by State Department of Public Works for
                 completion of road beds in Flushing Bay 

9/28/37  - 647 - Presentation announcement --   Report on Great Kills Harbor
                 (booklet with maps etc.)

10/3/37  - 648 - Official opening of six-and-seven tenths miles of parkway
                 in connection with West Side Improvement, October 12th. 

10/7/37  - 649 - Triborough Bridge Authority took bids for conpletion of
                 work on Grand Central Parkway extension between
                 St. Michael's Cemetery and Northern Boulevard.

10/11/37 - 650 - Exercises in connection with opening of West Side
                 Improvement, October 12th.

10/11/37 - 651 - Announcement of Henry Hudson Parkway being closed to
                 motoring public from 7 p. m. to 7 a. m. until November 1st.

10/11/37 - 652 - Letter from Commissioner Moses to Board of Estimate
                 attaching a copy of statement to press in answer to
                 questions as to the 1938 Executive Budget for maintenance
                 and operation of park system.  

10/15/37 - 653 - Announcement of informal ceremony at completion of three
                 new playgrounds: Queens, Liberty Avenue between 172nd &
                 173rd Streets: Harlem, Colonial Park on Bradhurst Avenue
                 Between 148th & 150th; Randall's Island west of cafeteria
                 building.

10/15/37 - 654 - Announcement of 5,000,000th car passing over Henry Hudson
                 Bridge.

10/??/37 - 655 - List of interesting places in the parks of New York City.

10/23/37 - 656 - Announcement of exhibition of handicraft by children of
                 parks playgrounds, week of October 25th in building D of
                 Roosevelt Playground.

10/26/37 - 657 - Announcement of new playground, two redesigned park areas
                 and new recreation and comfort station building: Queens,
                 43rd Street between Greenpoint & 47th Avenue; in Manhattan
                 at Second Avenue & East 17th Street; in Stuyvesant Park; in
                 Mt. Morris Park, Madison Avenue between 120th & 124th
                 Streets. 

10/27/37 - 658 - Fourth annual review of Civil Service Personnel and
                 equipment, October 28th, 10. a.m.

10/28/37 - 659 - Announcement of special parties and programs to celebrate
                 Hallowe'en in parks on October 29th & 30th.

10/29/37 - 660 - Chrysanthemem exhibit in Conservatory Gardens, Central
                 Park. Annual chrysanthemum show at Prospect Park
                 Greenhouse, October 31st, 10. a.m.

10/30/37 - 661 - Informal opening of two new playgrounds. One at Williamsburg
                 Housing Project on Scholes Street between Graham &
                 Manhattan Avenue; the other at Dahill Road & 38th Street,
                 Brooklyn.

11/4/37  - 662 - Announcement of social dances for the winter season.

11/8/37  - 663 - Letter by Commissioner Moses in answer to petition
                 requesting area in Riverside Park for dogs.

11/13/37 - 664 - Announcement of 2 new playgrounds in Brooklyn - Powell &
                 Sackman Streets and at South 3d and Berry Streets.

ll/4/37 - 665 - Report from. Mr. Moses to Board of Estimate on proposed
                 development of Wards Island and Pedestrian
                 Bridge. Recommends purchase of property on East River Drive
                 between 103d and 104th Sts for playground. Submission of
                 property lots 17 to 24 inclusive and 121 in Block
                 1697. Maps and pictures.

11/11/37 - 666 - Letter from Thelma Johnson suggesting Liberty for name of
                 Park. Letter to Thelma Johnson from Com. Moses.

11/22/37 - 667 - Supplementary description by Commissioner Moses as to
                 proposed pedestrian bridge to Ward's Island, explaining
                 that it may be reached by Queens residents by a ramp
                 without payment of toll. 

11/26/37 - 668 - Announcement of closing of golf courses, also figures of
                 attendance at the ten municipal courses for past season.

11/27/37 - 669 - Opening of three new playgrounds and a section of a
                 redesigned recreation area in Betsy Head Park.
                 Playground locations: Manhattan -- east of Harlem Housing
                 Project, between West 150th Street & West 154th Streets At
                 Ninth Avenue between 27th and 28th Streets in Chelsea Park
                 on the roof of the new Health Center Building.   In queens,
                 at Brookville Boulevard and Weller Avenue in Brookville
                 Park.

11/29/37 - 670 - Announcement by Commissioner Moses of acceptance from
                 Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., of a plot of ground on 150th
                 Street west of Seventh Avenue for a playground. (Bill
                 Robinson playground) 

12/3/37  - 671 - Statement in regard to assault on Charles Klein in Central
                 Park, and. stressing of need for more park policemen. By
                 Commissioner Moses.

12/6/37  - 672 - Letter to press from Commissioner Moses accompanying report
                 explaining request to Board of Estimate for the immediate
                 acquisition of rights-of-way for new parkways...mentioning
                 also proposed improvement of beaches, forthcoming program
                 for four-year parks program, and proposed extension of East
                 River Drive.

12/11/37 - 673 - Announcement of opening without ceremonies of Hutchinson
                 River Parkway Extension.

12/13/37 - 674 - Bids opened for planting and seeding along the Grand
                 Central Parkway Extension between the Long Island Railroad,
                 and Horace Harding Boulevard, in Flushing Meadow Park,
                 Queens.

12/18/37 - 675 - Opening new playground in Queens at 90th Street between
                 88th Avenue and 89th ave., Total number to-date is 358.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                              For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                 Saturday December 18, 1937


           The Department of Parks announces the opening of a new playground
in Queens today.

           The new playground at 90th Street between 88th and 89th Avenues
is equipped with swings, see-saws, slides, sand tables, play houses and
portable shower.  Basket ball and volley ball courts encircled by an
oval-shaped roller skating track are also provided.  Shade trees and
permanent concrete benches are included in the landscape treatment.

           This playground will make a total of 250 which have been added to
the Park Department's recreational system since the beginning of the present
administration. The total number available today is 358.

                                 - E N D -

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 11, 1937


              The Department of Parks announces that the Hutchinson River
Parkway Extension will be opened to the motoring public, without ceremonies,
today.  This project, which started on May 15th of this year, and which is
the newest link in the parkway system of The Bronx connects the highways of
that Borough with Westchester County and New England.  The former terminus
of the parkway was at Boston Post Road at the Westchester County line, and
it has been extended southward to Pelham Bridge Road at Bartow Station,
providing a route to Eastern Boulevard, the Triborough Bridge, and the new
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge now under construction at Ferry Point.  The State
Department of Public Works is preparing plans for the separation of grades
at the intersection of City Island Road with Pelham Bridge Road, so that the
increased parkway traffic on the former artery will not interfere with City
Island and Orchard Beach visitors.

              This new two-mile Parkway, planned by the Park Department and
built by the State Department of Public Works with State and Federal highway
funds has two concrete lanes in each direction, separated by a central mall.
The grading is sufficiently wide to permit the construction of an additional
lane on either side when necessary.

              Further to avoid congestion, the Department of Plant and
Structures is widening the Pelham Bridge over Eastchester Creek, by the
elimination of the westerly sidewalk, thus providing additional roadway
space for another lane of traffic, as the bridge was actually only three
lanes wide.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 11, 1937


                     Preliminary studies are also being made to extend
Hutchinson River Parkway along Westchester CreeK with a new bridge over
Eastchester Creek to Eastern Boulevard and Ferris Avenue, where it will meet
the portion now being built by the Triborough Bridge Authority as an
approach to the new Bronx-Whitestone Bridge. This will route through traffic
from Westchester County and New England directly to Queens and Long Island
without coming in contact with the heavy local traffic from Orchard Beach
and City Island.

                     At midnight, today, the four and one quarter mile Henry
Hudson Parkway from Dyckman Street to the Westchester County line, the first
completed link in the express highway and parkway system that will extend
the full length of Manhattan Island and The Bronx, will have been one year
in operation. On November 30th, the six millionth car passed through the
toll booths and it is estimated that approximately 6,219,487 cars will have
passed through by the end of today.

                                - E   N   D-

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 29, 1937


                Park Commissioner Mbses announced that he has accepted from
Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. the gift of a plot of ground on the north side
of West 150th Street just west of Seventh Avenue, to be used as a
neighborhood playground.  In 1934, Bill Robinson, the tap dancer, made
arrangements with Mr. Rockefeller for the use of this property for
playground purposes and, after a survey of the neighborhood, Commissioner
Moses agreed that the Department of Parks would develop the playground.
Mr. Rockefeller gave his permission promptly and it was opened to the public
on November 4, 1934.

                Although it is small, it takes care of an unusually large
number of children in this congested neighborhood and has been so successful
that Mr. Rockefeller decided that it should be made a permanent part of the
playground system.  It has been difficult to find adequate recreation space
in this section of the city and every small area that can possibly be made
available is a help.

                One unit of the Paul Laurence Dunbar Apartments, located on
the opposite side of 150th Street, alone could fill this play area, and the
Harlem Housing Development, which is just around the corner, has greatly
increased the need for additional recreation space in this section of the
Borough. The space now occupied by the Harlem Housing Development was
originally used by the tenants of the Dunbar apartments as a play area.

                With the development of this last open area in Harlem as a
housing project, it became necessary to find additional land and
arrangements have been made with the Board of Transportation to use the
block between 150th and 151st Streets just east of Seventh Avenue and with
the New York City Housing Authority for the use of the property along the
Harlem River in front of the housing development. A large two-block area is
to be acquired in conjunction with the extension of the East River Drive and
probably will be located in the vicinity of 145th Street and the Harlem
River.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 29, 1937

                                   (Copy)

                             ROCKEFELLER CENTER
                                  NEW YORK
                                 Room 5600
                            30 Rockefeller Plaza




                                                             November 17, 1937

Dear Mr. Moses:

                       I have your letter of November 16th inquiring whether
I would be willing to give to the City the three lots on West 150th Street
which you are now operating, under a temporary permit, as a playground.

                       With the completion of the Federal Housing group in
that neighborhood, it is quite obvious that the playground facilities are
inadequate and that permanent play areas should be provided for the children
of that section.  In view of this and particularly because of the very
remarkable record you have made in providing scores of new playgrounds for
the children of the City, I am very glad to comply with your request and
cooperate with you by deeding to the City this parcel of three lots on the
northerly side of West 150th Street and situated 100' west of Seventh
Avenue.

                       To make this gift effective, a deed will be executed
and transmitted to you within the next few days.

                       With kindest regards and sincere appreciation of your
very notable public service, I am

                                              Very sincerely,

                                        (Signed) JOHN D. ROCKEEEUER JR.

Hon. Robert Moses
Commissioner of Parks
The Arsenal, Central Park,
New York, N. Y.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


                              CITY OF NEW YORK

                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                           ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK

                                                            MONDAY,
                                                            NOVEMBER 29, 1937

                                                            November 18, 1937

Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
30 Rockefeller Plaza
New York City

Dear Mr. Rockefeller:

              Thank you very much for your agreement to deed to the city for
playground purposes your three lots on West 150th Street.  This places the
city further in your debt, and with the completion of the playground on the
Board of Transportation property south of the new Harlem Housing
Development, the school playground addition on Lenox Avenue and the
projected new play areas along the East River Drive Extension north of 125th
Street, will greatly improve recreational conditions in Harlem.

                                                 Cordially,

                                            (Signed) ROBERT MOSES

                                                        Commissioner

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          November 27, 1937


                 The Department of Parks announces the opening of three new
playgrounds and a section of a redesigned recreation area today.

                 In Manhattan, lying east of the Harlem Housing Project
along the Harlem River between West 150th Street and West 154th Street, the
new playground is equipped with swings, seesaws, slides, jungle gym, sand
tables, playhouses, a basketball court and horizontal bars and
ladders. Shade trees and permanent concrete benches are also part of the
landscape design. This playground was developed in conjunction with the
Housing Authority who set aside the land lying between the buildings and the
river for this purpose.  Inmediately to the south of the new apartment
buildings erected by the Authority, a large rectangle of land will shortly
be developed to provide for adolescent recreation.

                 At 9th Avenue between 27th and 28th Streets in Chelsea Park
on the roof of the new Health Center Building which was opened on July 13th,
1937, the playground has sand tables, playhouses, garden swings and a large
open play area.  Large privet shrubs in individual boxes, permanent concrete
benches and an enclosed loggia are also provided.

                 In Queens, at Brookville Boulevard and Weller Avenue in
Brookville Park, the new playground is equipped with swings, seesaws,
slides, jungle gym, sand tables, playhouses, ping pong tables, horizontal
bar and ladder, basketball and volley ball courts; also, a circular wading
pool surrounded by shade trees and permanent concrete benches. Brookville
Park, which occupies a long narrow valley and is entered from the Sunrise
Parkway at the north, is being completely constructed as a modern park with
modern facilities, of which this playground forms one unit. With the
completion of the planting and preparation of lawn areas, the balance of the
park, except for grass seeding, will be completed by the end of the year.

                 These three playgrounds will make a total of 249, which
have been added to the Park Department's recreational system since the
beginning of the present administration. The total number available today is
357.

                 In Brooklyn, at Livonia Avenue between Amboy and Horzl
Street in Betsy Head Park, the reconstruction consists of handball,
basketball, volley ball and horseshoe pitching courts. A modern swimming
pool to replace the former inadequate and unsanitary layout has already been
opened in this park and plans are being prepared now for a new bathhouse to
replace the old one destroyed by fire last summer.  The courts being opened
today form the second reconstructed unit to be completed in this park.

                                   -END-

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                       For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000 



                                       November 11, 1937




Miss Thelma Johnson
110-31 166th Street
Jamaica, L.I. , N.Y.

Dear Thelma,

         I have your letter recommending that we name the new park and
playground development at Liberty Avenue and 172nd Street "Liberty Park."
This is one of the most sensible suggestions for naming a park and
playground area that we have received and we will note this in our records
so that whenever the area is referred to from now on it will be called by
that name.

         It will, of course, be necessary for the proper City authorities to
adopt resolutions naming this area and we shall take care of this the early
part of next year.

         In addition to the reasons you mention for naming this Liberty
Park, we believe that it is a proper designation because it is located on
Liberty Avenue and agrees with our theory that the names given to parks
should be definitely associated with their locations.

           Thank you for sending this suggestion to us.

                               Very truly yours,

                          (Signed)    ROBERT MOSES

                                 Commissioner

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                   For Immediate Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    

                       110-31 166th Street
                       Jamaica, N.Y.
                       Oct. 26, 1937



Dear Sir,

         I am a little girl of 10 years old.  I suggest that the new park
that is near Public School 116 and Liberty Ave. should be named Liberty
Park. Because Liberty in our country means a great deal, and besides it
means Freedom.

                       Respectfully yours,

                       (s) Thelma. Johnson

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              CITY OF NEW YORK
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                           ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK

                                                             November 4, 1937


Board of Estimate and Apportionment
Municipal Building
New York City

Gentlemen:

            I am enclosing a report on the proposed development of Wards
Island when it is vacated by the State and becomes a City Park as provided
by law, and on the necessity for the future construction of a pedestrian
bridge between this island and the Manhattan shore of the East River.  I
believe that property should be acquired immediately to insure a proper
approach to this structure from East 103rd Street and to fit into the
present playground area on the East River Drive between 103rd Street and
104th Street.

            In accordance with Section 442-A of the Charter, I request the
approval of your Board and the separate approval of the Mayor on the
selection of the property known as lots 17 to 24 inclusive, and 121 in Block
1697, technical description of which is attached, for park purposes, and ask
that a proceeding to acquire title to this property be authorized.  The
assessed value of the area is $50,000. I further request that your Board
approve the purchase of the part of this area known as lots 17 to 24
inclusive, which is assessed for the year of 1937 at $40,000. at a price not
to exceed $44,000.00.

                                   Very truly yours,

                                    (Robert Moses signature)
                                    Commissioner

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

            REPORT ON TEE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OF WARD'S ISLAND
            AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE BETWEEN
                THE ISLAND AND EAST 103RD STREET, MANHATTAN

                  The Metropolitan Conference of Parks, of which I was
chairman, recommended in February, 1930, that both Ward's and Randall's
Islands be set aside for park purposes and that the House of Refuge, the New
York City Children's Hospital and the Manhattan State Hospital for the
Insane be removed from these islands as rapidly as possible.  An act was
prepared to establish these parks and to provide for the removal of the
inmates, patients and employees of the State and City institutions to other
points outside the city where land was cheaper and the site more desirable
from the point of view of operation.  This act was never adopted but,
subsequently, on April 7, 1933, Chapter 144 of the Laws of 1933 became
effective and provided for the removal of the House of Refuge from Randall's
Island within two years of that date, and the Manhattan State Hospital on
Ward's Island within ten years. The last of the inmates of the House of
Refuge were ramoved from Randall's Island on May 19, 1935, This was
accomplished only because the Triborough Bridge Authority and the Park
Department insisted upon the removal and amid a great deal of unnecessary
confusion.  All of this could have been eliminated had the evacuation been
properly planned in advance.  It was definitely understood by all the
parties concerned that the Triborough Bridge Authority and the Park
Department had to proceed with the construction of the bridge but lack of
available space in State institutions, and the natural reluctance on the
part of the employees on the island to leave this location, so convenient to
the city, made an orderly removal inpossible.  Finally the State assumed the
responsibility for the inmates in both the Children's Hospital and House of
Refuge in State Institutions for the feeble minded or insane, The
development of Randall's Island Park is now practically complete.


                  The problem.of removal of the inmates from the Manhattan
State Hospital on Ward's Island has been discussed with Dr. Tiffany, the new
head of the State Department of Mental Hygiene, and he has agreed that he
will work with the Park Department so as to eliminate the confusion which
attended the Randall's Island matter.  The situation has been improved by
the passage of a bill by the State Legislature at the instance of Governor
Lehman providing for a referendum on a State Bond Issue of $40,000,000. for
conpleting various institutional developments.  This was approved on
November 2nd and will provide means for expediting the removal of the
remaining inmates on Ward's Island.  The census at this hospital has dropped
within the last few years from 7,214 to a present figure of about 3,200,
which indicates that, while there is a problem, it is not nearly as
difficult as it was a few years ago when the bill establishing the park was
passed and it can and should be disposed of promptly.  The new bond issue
will permit the immediate planning of additional facilities at state
institutions outside the city limits and thus provide for the 3,200 patients
on Ward's Island.  Some of the buildinps have already been abandoned and
many are only partially used so that it will be possible for the city, with
the cooperation of the Department of Mental Hygiene, to proceed promptly in
an orderly fashion to develop the Island for the recreation of the people in
this section of the city.

              Recently, a committee of distinguished physicians, who were
anxious to use a part of Ward's Island as a site for a medical museum,
called on Governor Lehman and enlisted his support in furtheringthe project.
He agreed that he was favorably inclined toward the establishment of this
museum and he would do what he could to help in the matter.  Their plan
which would call for the use of approximately twenty acres of land and
probably two of the existing buildings, can be worked into our plan for the
development of the park and I have informed them that I would be glad to
cooperate with them on the project.

             Ward's Island, which is 254 acres in extent, is divided
into two parts.  The northeasterly corner, composed of 77 acres, is the
site of a sewage disposal plant and the balance of the area, or 177 acres,
has definitely been set aside for park development.  The tremendous value of
this island as a park can be readily understood when you consider that it is
only 900 feet distant from the upper east side of Manhattan, which records
show to be the most congested section of the City of New York.  The island
has an assessed value of $7,974,600.  Without the improvements and it would
cost the City of New York at least $65,000,000. to acquire a similar area on
Manhattan Island, assuming that it would be a physical possibility to set
apart such a large area without seriously interfering with Manhattan
traffic.  This is equivalent to an area in Manhattan bounded by the East
River, 100th Street, Park Avenue and 115th Street, which area is assessed at
$53,800,000.

             Ward's Island can be reached at the present time only by means
of the Triborough Bridge and Randall's Island.  The Triborough Bridge
Authority as a part of its project constructed a low level bridge connecting
Randall's and Ward's Islands.  This serves the purpose admirably at the
present time, and will continue to meet the need of vehicular traffic but
not that of the local people in Manhattan and Queens who wish to walk to
Ward's Island.

             It is obvious from a glance at the city map that this park
should serve the people living between 86th Street and 114th Street in
Manhattan and the people from Astoria in Queens.  It is also obvious that
these same Manhattan people, and the records show there are about 200,000 of
them, would have to walk north to 125th Street, across the Triborough Bridge
and south again on Randall's Island across the bridge to Ward's Island, the
area which is supposed to serve their section of the city.  This means that
they would walk a distance of about three miles to get to a park, which just
will not happen.  When I was first appointed to the Triborough Bridge
Authority I had a study made of the possibility of moving the Manhattan
Approach southerly to about 103rd Street so that the toll plaza and ramps to
the island would have been on Ward's Island. Land acquisition at 125th
Street in Harlem had progressed to a point where plans could not be changed
and this logical proposal was abandoned.

            I have had engineering studies made to determine the best way of
making this island accessible to the rehabilitated east side and I find that
a pedestrian bridge is desirable and essential if the city is to take
advantage of this extremely valuable piece of city property. This structure
can be a lift span fifteen feet wide, with a 55 foot clearance above mean
high water the same as the Manhattan connection of the Triborough
Bridge. The lift span would be 300 feet between towers and would be flanked
by two fixed spans each 245 feet long between the lift span and the
shores. These fixed spans would be reached by long sloping ramps at either
end. The same people who would have to walk three miles to reach the island,
by the present method would have their walking distance cut to approximately
1,000 feet by the construction of this bridge.

            The construction of the East River Drive from 92nd Street to
125th Street will cause this section to be rebuilt as a residential
community and the zoning has already been changed so that any new
construction will be residential in character. The Board of Education has
recently selected a site for a new high school along this Drive and property
values are on the increase.  A long narrow strip of property will have to be
acquired for the Manhattan approach to this bridge and I have found a plot
which is available and in the right location on the north side of East 103rd
Street west of the small playground on the East River Drive between 103rd
Street and 104th Street. It would cost the city almost as much to acquire
the frontage along 103rd Street as it would to acquire the whole plot to a
depth of 100 feet.  The acquisition of this additional land will also permit
the Park Department to properly landscape the approach and also extend the
facilities provided in the small neighborhood playground now operating
between 103rd and 104th Streets on the Drive.  This property, which is
approximately 250 feet by 100 feet has an assessed value of $50,000 and
should be acauired immediately and, as soon as a definite schedule for the
removal of inmates from Ward's Island has been established, funds sheuld be
appropriated to cover the cost of the design of the pedestrian bridge.

             You will find that the following exhibits, which are attached,
will give a clearer picture of the problem.


                 1.   Air view of proposed bridge connecting
                      Manhattan and Ward's Island.

                 2.   Map showing Ward's Island superimposed
                      on the upper east side of Manhattan.

                 3.   Proposed development plan of the island.

                 4.   Miscellaneous air views showing Ward's
                      and Randall's Islands.

                 5.   Map showing density of population in
                      the area to be served by Ward's Island
                      Park.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    November 13, 1937

            The Department of Parks announces the opening of two new
playgrounds today.

            In Brooklyn, at Powell and Sackman Streets between Glenmore and
Pitkin Avenues, the new playground is equipped with swings, seesaws, slides,
playhouses, sand, play and ping-pong tables. Handball and paddle tennis
courts, a rectangular wading pool and a large play area encircled by an oval
shaped roller skating track are also provided.  Shade trees and permanent
concrete benches, form part of the landscape design.

            Also in Brooklyn, at South Third and Berry Streets, the new
playground is for small children and has swings, see-saws, slides,
playhouses, sand tables, a play area and a rectangular wading pool, which
can be used as a volley ball court in spring and fall.  The entire plot is
encircled by a landscaped area with shade trees. Permanent concrete benches
have also been installed. These areas are two more of the sites selected by
the Commissioner of Parks, and acquired by condemnation after authorization
by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment in 1936, to take care of the
recreational needs of neglected neighborhoods.  They will make a total of
246, which have been added to the Park Department's recreational system
since the beginning of the present administration.  The total number
available today is 354.

                                 - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 30, 1937


          The Department of Parks announces the informal opening today
of two new playgrounds, one of which was opened in part some time ago.

          In Brooklyn, at the Williamsburg Housing Project, on Scholes
Street between Graham and Manhattan Avenues, the new playground is
equipped with swings, see-saws, slides, jungle gym, playhouses, sand
table, horizontal and parallel bars. An oval shaped wading pool, two
large play areas for games, horse shoe pitching and handball courts
are also part of the layout. Shade trees have been planted around the
entire perimeter and permanent concrete benches have been provided.

         At Dahill Road and 38th Street, also in Brooklyn, the new
playground, the wading pool section of which was opened some time ago, has
facilities for handball, basketball, volley ball, soft ball games, a roller
skating track, horizontal ladders and bars and a generously equipped small
children's playground with slides, swings, see-saws, playhouse and sand
tables. Shade trees and permanent concrete benches are also included in the
design. Thia area is another one of the twenty-four sites selected by the
Commissioner of Parks and acquired by condemnation after authorization by
the Board of Estimate and Apportionmant, on July 15, 1936 to tike care of
the recreational needs of neglected neighborhoods.

          These two playgrounds will make a total of 244 which have been
added to the Park Department's recreational system since the beginning
of the present administration. The total number available today is 358.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 29, 1937


            The Park Department announces that at the Conservatory Gardens
in Central Park, just off Fifth Avenue at 105th Street, which was opened
to the public on September 18th, there is an unusual display of
chrysant heraums.

           At the north end around the lily fountain there are over 2000
white plants in flower and at the south end around the Burnett Memorial
Fountain, there are about 1500 white, crimson, yellow and bronze plants.

            This profuse bloom of chrysanthemums, now, that the other plants
are through flowering, will provide an attraction until a heavy frost
destroys them.

           Aside from the floral display the garden offers a place in which
to relax, rest, and enjoy the beauty and inspiration of nature.

            In Brooklyn, the Annual Fall Chrysanthemum Show at the Prospect
Park Greenhouse, Prospect Park West and 9th Street, will be opened on
Sunday, October 31st at 10 A.M.

            The display has over 4,000 pots of chrysanthemums on exhibition.
The ground bed is laid out in groups of various formations, with the popular
large bloom varieties in all shades of pink, yellow, red and bronze.  Some
of the attractive plants are the Pooketts, Turners, John S. Bush, Rise of
Day and the Melba.

            Surrounding this feature of the display, banked on the sides of
the show house are 75 varieties of smaller size chrysanthemums such as the
Pompons and the Anemone, in the shades of bronze, rod, yellow and white.
Some of the outstanding chrysanthemums in this class to be exhibited, are
the Titan Tangerine Bronze, Norman Pink and Bronze, Mrs.  Harrison
Crnig-Orange and Crimson, Betty Rose Pink and Yellow, Crimson Glow, Crimson
Red.

            The exhibit will be open every day from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. and
the Park Department extends a cordial invitation to view the display for
three weeks.

                                    END

October 29, 1937

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    Tuesday, October 26, 1937


          The Department of Parks announces the opening today of one new
playground, two redesigned and reconstructed park areas and a new recreation
and comfort station building.

            In Queens, at 43rd Street between Greenpoint and 47th Avenues,
the new playground is equipped with swings, see-saws, slides; playhouses,
horizontal bars and ladders. A rectangular wading pool which is encircled by
an oval shaped roller skating track, handball courts and a large play area
for soft ball games, have also been provided. Shade trees which have been
planted around the perimeter of the entire area and permanent concrete
benches complete the design.

            This area is one of twenty-four sites selected by the
Commissioner of Parks, and acquired by condemnation after authorization by
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, July 15, 1926, to take care of the
recreational needs of neglected neighborhoods.  It will make a total of 242
playgrounds which have been added to the Park Department's recreational
system since the beginning of the present administration.  The total number
available today is 350.

            In Manhattan, at 2nd Avenue and East 17th Street in Stuyvesant
Park, another section of this park has been remodeled.  This section, like
the remainder of the park is for passive recreation and is equipped with
continuous rows of permanent concrete benches around its semi-circular
walks. Shade trees and landscaping complete the layout.

           In Mount Morris Park, Madison Avenue between 120th and 124th
Streets, the entire east half of the park has been remodeled with new walks,
grading and landscaping.

           The new recreation building is of white brick construction with
black brick trim around windows and doors.  It has separate comfort
facilities for men, women, boys and girls, a milk station and a large play
room for indoor games during inclement weather.

                                    END


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              INTERESTING PIACES IN THE PARKS OF NEW YORK CITY

                                 MANHATTAN


BATTERY PARK - At the southern extremity of Manhattan.

               Barge Office, a branch of the custom house.

               Ferries to Brooklyn and'Staten Island, known collectively as
               South Ferry.

               THE AQUARIUM - formerly Fort Clinton - since modified into
               Castle Garden, now the Aquarium.
               Managed by the New York Zoological Society.
               The collections include both marine and fresh-water forms
               of life.

BOWLING GREEN- Triangular space at the foot of Broadway.   The oldest park
               in the city.

BRYANT PARK -  At 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue.

               A fine formal park in business section of city.

               NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY.   Open air reading room.

CENTRAL PARK - 59th St. to 110th St., Fifth Avenue to Central Park West

               Central Park contains 879 acres of beautiful lawns, wooded
               spaces, meadows and lakes.

               THE MALL - Central Park's central and chief promenade, a quarter
               of a mile long, planted with parallel rows of stately elms. In
               summer, concerts are given at the north end of the Mall at the
               Naumberg Music Shell. Dancing is also held at this area.

               CONSERVATORY GARDEN - Fifth Avenue and 105th Street. - An
               entirely new garden about 420 feet wide and 760 feet long. The
               northern section contains a lily pool surrounded by planting
               areas. The center section is a large level lawn area surrounded
               by hedges, with granite steps et the entrance to the garden at
               Fifth Avenue and a fountain west of the lawn area. The southern
               section contains the BURNETT MEMORIAL BIRD BATH and is planted
               with, a large variety of flowers. A large number of flowering
               trees have also been planted.

               EIGHTEEN MARGINAL PLAYGROUNDS for small children.

               MARY HARRIMAN RUMSEY PLAYGROUND on site of former Casino 
               restaurant near 72nd Street entrance.

               HECKSCHER PLAYGROUND - near Seventh Avenue and 59th Street -
               a small children's playground, wading pool, playground
               baseball diamonds and horseshoe pitching courts.

               BOAT HOUSES near Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street entrances.
               Row boats may be rented.

               NORTH MEADOW PLAYGROUND - near 97th Street entrance, center
               of park. Excellent games on thirteen baseball diamonds.

               TAVERN-ON-THE-GREEN - Moderate priced restaurant at
               Central Park West and 67th Street.

               THE ZOO - fifth Avenue and 64th Street entrance.

               Opened in 1934, consists of nine new buildings built around
               a quadrangle, the center of which contains a sunken garden
               with a seal pool and flying cages. A wide variety of ani-
               mals, birds and reptiles are on exhibition. At the Zoo
               Cafeteria, food and refreshments may be purchased at reas-
               onable prices.

               METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART - Main entrance at Fifth Avenue
               and 82nd Street.

CITY HALL PARK -  Broadway and Chambers Street.
                  City Hall where the government of the city is conducted.

FORT TRYON PARK - Fort Washington and Northern Avenues.
                  Donated to Kew York City by John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
                  Most beautifully landscaped park in New York City. Terraces
                  provide excellent view of Hudson River and the Palisades.
                  A new building is now being constructed for the Cloisters,
                  a branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
                  Moderate priced restaurant.

MADISON SQUARE PARK - 23rd to 26th Streets, Broadway and Madison Avenues.
                      One of the older parks in business section.

MANHATTAN SQUARE PARK- 77th to 81st Streets, Central Park West to Columbus Ave.
                       AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.
                       Akeley Memorial Hall of African Mammals.
                       The Theodore Roosevelt Memorial.
                       The Heyden Planeterium.

RANDALL'S ISLAND -     East River opposite 125th Street; entrances from
                       Manhattan, Bronx and Queens approaches to Triborough
                       Bridge. Sports Stadium, seating 21,441;   Track
                       Meets, Football Games; Light Operas. Cafeteria. 

SARA DELANO ROOSEVELT PLAYGROUND - Chrystie and Forsythe Streets, Canal to
                    East Houston Streets.

                     Seven blocks of children's playgrounds, wading pools and
                     sports areas, with five recreation buildings,

STUYVESANT SQUARE -  Fifteenth Street and Second Avenues.

                     Filled with fine old trees and surrounded by hospitals,
                     St. George's Church and Friends Meeting House. This was
                     a part of the Stuyvesant property.

UNION SQUARE -       Broadway at 14th Street.
                     Outdoor meetings often take place in the square.

WASHINGTON SQUARE PARK - At the southern terminus of Fifth Avenue.
                    Surrounded by old residences and New York University
                    buildings.

RIVERSIDE PARK AND DRIVE- Lies along the high banks of the Hudson, between
                   72nd and Dyckman Streets.

                   WEST SIDE IMPROVEMENT - The plan for the West Side
                   Improvement along Riverside Drive from 72nd Street to
                   Dyckman Street includes a wide variety of facilities for
                   active recreation, When this work is completed, there
                   will be eight children's playgrounds with wading pools
                   and recreational buildings; twelve full-size baseball
                   fields and seven soft ball diamonds. A miniature
                   Randall's Island track and field layout will be a
                   feature. Thirty handball, twenty horseshoe and fifteen
                   tennis courts, plus a large number of shuffle boards,
                   basket ball, paddle tennis and other court games are
                   being constructed. Three new boat basins will be built
                   for motor boat fans; bicyclists will have an exclusive
                   river front track, while roller skating enthusiasts will
                   have eighteen city blocks of track and two roller hockey
                   rinks.

                   THE GINGKO TREE - On the north side of Grant's Tomb there
                   is a gingko tree sent to New York by Li Hung Chang in 1897.

                   CLAREMONT RESTAURANT - One of the historic landmarks of
                   the city. It stands on a bluff just behind Grant's tomb.

HENRY HUDSON PARKWAY - Dyckman Street to Van Cortlandt Park - Bridge over
                    Spuyten Duyvil Creek connects Manhattan and The Bronx.

EAST RIVER DRIVE -   This new parkway from 92nd Street to the approach of the
                     Triborough Bridge at 125th Street is lined with trees
                     and benches.

                                      BRONX


BRONX PARK -    East 180th Street and Bronx Park East.

                The park area is 698 acres of natural woods and open spaces.

                THE BOTANICAL GARDEN - a botanical garden, museum and
                arboretum for the collection and culture of plants, flowers,
                shrubs and trees. 

                ZOOLOGICAL PARK - Eleven miles of fences surrounding the
                park encloses 264 acres, of which 30 are water. Tiiyre are
                14 large and 10 small animal houses - eight miles of walks
                and roads. The collection consists of 2636 species of
                mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.

BRONX AND PELHAM PARKKAY - A two and ose-half mile parkway connecting Bronx
                and Pelham Bay Park. 

PELHAM BAY PARK-Eastern Boulevard and Long Island Sound

                This is the largest of the city parks - 2125 acres.

                ORCHARD BEACH - a crescent of white sand one mile long,
                provides a new bathing beach. There are lockers and dressing
                room facilities for 5400 persons, and a parking space for
                8000 cars.  A cafeteria and a terrace overlooking the Sound
                and a mall 250 feet by 1400 feet long, lined with benches
                and trees, will connect the bath houses with a large lagoon
                for small boating.

VAN CORTLANDT PARK - 242nd Street and Broadway.

                 Area contains 1112 acres of rocky woodland, lake, stream and
                 a large parade ground.

                 The parade ground contains liberal facilities for baseball
                 and cricket.

                 THE COLONIAL GARDEN - In the southeastern section of the
                 park, is one of the distinct features.

                                  BROOKLYN

PROSPECT PARK - Prospect Park West and Union Street.

                Area contains 526 acres.

                This park is noted for its spacious meadows, large variety of
                trees and shrubs and large lake.

                THE BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES and the BROOKLYN
                BCTMIC GARDEN are located on the northeast side of Prospect
                Park.

                THE ZOO at this park is one of the most modern and beautiful
                menageries in the country. In the center of the area there is
                a seal pool from which walks radiate to the buildings housing
                lions, horned aniwals, monkeys and birds. The elephants
                reside in a large domed building in the center of the group.
                The tea.? dors of huge boulders, simulating a mountain side,
                are built into the slope which rises toward Flatbush Avenue.
                A restaurant occupies a corner of the area.

                Facilities for outdoor recreation includes areas for boating,
                horseback riding, croquet, field hockey, picnics, lawn tennis
                and music grove for band concerts.

OCEAN PARKWAY - A five and one-half drive, lined with trees from the Ocean
                Parkway entrance at Prospect Park to Coney Island.

SHORE ROAD DRIVE- A beautiful three-mile parkway from Owl's Head Park at Fourth
                Avenue and 67th Street passes Owl's Head Park at Colonial Road
                and continues along the Narrows to Fort Hamilton, and then to
                Dyker Beach Park.

MARINE PARKWAY BRIDGE - From southern end of Flatbush Avenue connecting
                Brooklyn with Jacob Riis Park in Queens.

                                   QUEENS

            One of the outstanding features of Queens' borough is the Grand
            Central Parkway and its extension. Starting from the Triborough
            Bridge approach, it passes Flushing Meadow, Hillside and Alley Pond
            Parks and continues on into Eastern Long Island.

ALLEY POND PARK - Grand Central Parkway and Springfield Boulevard.

            486 acres of wooded areas ideal for outdoor picnics, with
            fireplaces, tables and benches; nature trail, athletic field
            with baseball diamonds, hockey and soccer fields and tennis
            courts.

CHISHOLM PARK - Poppenhausen Avenue, East River and 119th Street.

            Area - 26 acres.

            Old Chisholm Mansion erected about a century ago, has interesting
            historical background, and is located on top of a hill
            overlooking the river. It was used for the Mayor's summer office
            in 1937. 

CUNNINGHAM PARK - Grand Central Parkway and Cross Island Boulevard.

            Area - 459 acres.

            Native woodland, ideal for outdoor picnics, with fireplaces,
            tables and benches, tennis courts and recreation area.

FLUSHING MEADOW PARK - Union Turnpike North to Long Island Railroad and North
            along Grand Central Parkway Extension.

            Area - 1054 acres.

            Site for New York World's Fair 1939 (now under construction.)

FOREST PARK - Myrtle Avenue, Union Turnpike and Park Lane South.

            Area - 538 acres.

            Wooded area with picnic grounds, playgrounds, athletic field,
            baseball diamonds, golf course and music grove.

JACOB RIIS PARK - Beach 149th Street and Atlantic Ocean.

            Area - 234 acres.

            Splendid bathing boach - the world's largest single unit concrete
            parking space accommodating 14,000 automobiles; boach games and
            thirty foot walk; modern self-service food-bar.

                                  RICHMOND

CLARENCE T. BARRETTPARK - Broadway, Glenwood Place and Clove Road.

              Area - 8 acres.

              The zoo in this park presents a varied exhibit. The primary
              function is to provide facilities for teaching some phases of
              natural history and biology to pupils of the community.

CLOVE LAKES PARK - Victory Boulevard and Slosson Avenue.

              Area - 191 acres.

              Three large lakes used for model yachting and fishing in season;
              children's playground, athletic field, bridle path and picnic
              ground, with fireplaces, tables and benches.

LATOURETTE PARK - Forest Hill and London Roads.

              Area - 580 acres.

              Original LaTourette homestead used for golf club-house.
              Wooded area for picnic grounds.

SILVER LAKEPARK - Forest Avenue to Clove Road and Victory Boulevard.

              Area - 207 acres;    elevation 260 feet above sea level.

              Reservoir one and one-half miles in circumference, ideal for
              walking.

WILLOWBRDOKPARK - Richmond and Rockland Avenues.

              Area - 118 acres.

              Wooded area with picnic grounds, fireplaces, tables and benches.
              Lake for boating and fishing in season.

WOLFE'S POND PARK - Raritan Boulevard from Holton to Cornelia Avenues.

              Area - 224 acres.

              Wooded area for picnic ground, with fireplaces, tables and
              benches; bathing beach, baseball field, bridle path, 
              children's playground and lake for boating.

   JJD:bn
   10-15-37

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 15, 1937


                 The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announced that the five
millionth car passed over the Henry Hudson Bridge spanning the Harlem River
at 12:10 noon, Friday, October 15th, 1937. It was owned and driven by
Mr. James J. Carroll of 427 West 51st Street, New York City, enroute from
his home to Greenwich, Conn. He is the manager of Carroll's Restaurant
located at 875 Tenth Avenue, New York City.

                 The volume of traffic over this bridge which was opened ten
months ago yesterday has been far greater than anticipated with the result
that revenues are two and one half times the carrying charges.  It was
necessary for the Authority to issue a new $2,000,000. bond issue last July
and award contracts for the erection of an upper deck for the bridge and
additional connecting roadways and landscaping through Inwood Hill Park from
the bridge to Dyckman Street, and also the widening of the parkway to three
lanes each in each direction from Kappock Street to 259th Street.

                 This work, which is already under way, will be completed in
the spring of 1938, ready to meet the demands of the increased traffic pace
further evidenced since Columbus Day when the final link of the parkway from
72nd to Dyckman Streets was opened.

                 In accordance with the custom previously established, the
Authority donated a fifty-trip booklet of tickets to Mr. Carroll.

                                    END

October 15, 1937

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 15, 1937

                The Department of Parks announces the completion of three
new playgrounds which will be opened to the public this evening and
tomorrow. Two of these playgrounds, which have been completely equipped with
flood lights, will be opened this evening by Mayor LaGuardia and Park
Commissioner Robert Moses, who will officiate at informal ceremonies
featured by programs staged by playground children.

                One of these playgrounds is in Queens and is located on
Liberty Avenue between 172nd and 173rd Streets. The other is in Colonial
Park in Harlem and is located on Bradhurst Avenue between 148th Street and
150th Street.

                The new Liberty Avenue Playground has a football field,
baseball diamonds, tennis courts, roller skating track, and a quarter-mile
running track.  A fully equipped playground for small children is also part
of the development.  The entire perimeter is landscaped with shade trees and
grass plots, with permanent benches installed under the shade trees. The
Mayor and the Park Commissioner will open this area Sst 8 o'clock and
entertainment will be furnished by the boys' band of the Church of
St. Catherine of Sienna and singing and dancing acts of the playground
children.

                After leaving the Queens' Playground at 8:15, the officials
will motor to the playground in Harlem which will be opened promptly at
8:45. Prior to the arrival of the Mayor and the Park Commissioner, the
children of the neighborhood will take part in a parade from 145th Street
and Bradhurst Avenue which will be led by a fife and drum
corp. Entertainment here will be featured with a program of songs and music
by the Colonial hill-billies, an organization of Harlem playground children
that won third place in the recent city-wide contest on the mall in Central
Park. Members of the New York State Temporary Commission on Urban Colored
Population have been especially invited to attend these opening exercises.

            The Colonial Park Playground has been planned for small children
and is equipped with swings, see-saws, slides, jungle gyms, playhouses and
sand tables. The permanent benches and trees placed in this new area forra a
part of the general landscape scheme of this ten-block recreational
park. Other units at this park already open to the public include the
swimming pool and bath house, dance floor and band shell, and two additional
playgrounds lying to the north of the one to be opened this evening.

            The third playground on Randall's Island will be opened on
Saturday and is located in the shadow of the Triborough Bridge, west of the
new cafeteria building. It was planned for kindergarten and junior children
and is equipped with swings, see-saws, basketball, volleyball, horse shoe
pitching, shuffleboard, and paddle tennis courts. Sand tables, playhouses
and a large wading pool are also a part of the development.  The shade trees
and permanent benches are a part of the general landscape scheme of the
194-acre recreational area planned on Randall's Island.

           These three new playgrounds make a total of 241 which have been
added to the Park Department recreational system sinco the beginning of the
present administration.  Prior to January, 19S4, there were only 108 in the
five boroughs.  The total number available on Saturday will be 549.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 11, 1937


                The Department of Parks announces that exercises in
connection with the opening of the West Side Improvement in Riverside and
Fort Washington Parks, Manhattan, will take place on Columbus Day, October
12th.

                Besides Park Commissioner Robert Moses who will preside,
Governor Lehman, Mayor LaGuardia, Frank J. Taylor, Comptroller of the City
of New York, Samuel Levy, President of the Borough of Manhattan, James
J. Lyons, President of the Borough of The Bronx, R. E. Dougherty,
Vice-President of the New York Central System, and M. J. Madigan, President
of Madigan-Hyland, Consulting Engineers, will participate in the
exercises. Mr. Moses will be introduced by Russell B. Corey, President of
the West of Central Park Association, an organization which has been
identified with various movements to improve the West Side of Manhattan.

                The ceremonies will start at 10:45 A.M., with a motor parade
from Dyckman Street south along Riverside Drive. The parade, which will be
headed by the Police Department Band, will pause just north of the George
Washington Bridge while Governor Lehman cuts a ribbon across the temporary
northerly entrance to the parkway, and will then proceed to 79th Street,
where the speaking will take place at 11:15 sharp. Stations WEAF, WINS and
WNYC, will broadcast this part of the exercises.

               The completion of the West Side Improvement and the Henry
Hudson Parkway not only provides a major traffic artery and new lawns and
extensive planting areas to serve as ever-changing foregrounds for the river
views, but also a noteworthy recreational plant. Its opening, through
Riverside and Fort Washington Parks from 72nd to Dyckman Streets, will
provide, at a total cost of $24,340,000., an immediate usable section of a
great marginal waterfront development.  152 acres of new park land valued at
$30,000,000., have been made by filling land under water and covering 2-1/2
miles of railroad tracks. Approximately 3,000,000 cubic yards of fill from
exterior sources have been used.

               Besides the 6-3/4 niles of new parkway which will be added to
the 4-1/2 miles of the Henry Hudson Parkway previously opened on December
12th last year, there will also be available for use 78 acres of play area
including completely equipped children's playgrounds, comfort stations,
athletic fields, tennis courts, handball courts, baseball and football
fields, roller skating and bicycling tracks. The entire area west of the
railroad at Inwood Hill Park extending from Dyckman Street to the Harlem
Ship Canal, will be devoted exclusively to active recreation.  Three miles
of promenades and 26-1/2 miles of winding foot paths with benches under
shade trees will be available for pedestrians and those seeking rest and
quiet. Plans have also been developed for marine recreational facilities in
the form of four boat basins located respectively at 79th Street, 96th
Street, 148th Street and Dyckman Street. All but the 148th Street basin,
which will be under the jurisdiction of the Department of Docks, will be
operated by the Park Department.  The basins at 79th and 96th Streets are
actually under construction.

        The rocky shore of Fort Washington Park is being developed for the
purpose of restoring and preserving its natural scenic beauty as an area for
passive recreation.

       Along with all the new development west of the Riverside Drive wall,
the rehabilitation of the upper level bordering the Drive is now taking
place.  Thousands of new trees and shrubs are being planted, the lawn areas
are being reconditioned, paths are being widened and repaired, and hundreds
of new benches are being placed.

        On October 15th, work in connection with the renovation of Grant's
Tomb, which was dedicated in 1897, will be completed by the monument
restoration group of the Park Department. The entire interior has been
cleaned and worn floors and broken carved marble have been restored.  The
exterior of the structure has been waterproofed.

       While the new development will be opened to the public on Columbus
Day, much construction still has to be progressed before it is finished. At
96th Street, the tardy completion of two parkway bridges will necessitate
the use of short stretches of temporary pavement. North of 96th Street, the
completion of the major play area of the development is dependent upon the
progress of bulkheading and placing of additional fill.  Here, too, the
parkway will run partially on temporary pavement. North of George Washington
Bridge, Riverside Drive will be used for both north and south bound traffic
for several months until the south-bound parkway drive, which ties into the
Henry Hudson Bridge approach at Dyckman Street, is completed.  The approach
to the new upper deck of the Henry Hudson Bridge is being progressed through
Inwood Hill Park, contracts have been let for the upper decking of the
bridge structure, and the entire improvement of this stretch of the parkway
will be completed early in the spring.

         At present the Riverside Drive area is patrolled by four different
police precincts. Because of the increased number of people who will use the
new park areas for active and passive recreation, and to prevent serious
accidents, children will have to be prohibited from approaching the roadways
where automobiles will be traveling uninterruptedly at 35 miles per hour.
In order to obtain adequate police coverage to safeguard life and City
property, the Park Department is asking the Police Department to consolidate
this new area, together with Fort Tryon, Inwood Hill and Sakura Parks, into
and under the jurisdiction of one precinct with an approximate total force
of 100 park-conscious, special-trained officers of all titles. At present
there is a building available at 155th Street and Riverside Drive suitable
as a headquarters for this purpose.

         Properly to maintain and operate this intensive development in the
manner and during such hours as the public has learned to demand in the past
four years, the Park Department has requested from the budget authorities
222 new positions at an annual cost of $343,780.50.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    October 3, 1937


                     The Department of Parks announces that on Tuesday,
October 12th, the 6.7 miles of parkway now under construction in Riverside
and Fort Washington Parks in connection with the West Side Improvement will
be officially opened to the public, thereby adding another vital link in a
great arterial express highway and parkway system for the City of New York.

                     The new parkway will be officially known as the Henry
Hudson Parkway and will connect, at Dyckman Street, with the 4.5 miles of
parkway previously opened on December 12th, 1936. After the opening
exercises on Columbus Day, motorists will be able to proceed uninterrupted
from Canal Street over the West Side Express Highway and the Henry Hudson
Parkway to the Saw Mill River Parkway and at the City line at the north end
of Van Cortlandt Park.

                     Besides the parkway there will also be available for
public use, 78 acres of play area including children's playgrounds, athletic
fields and tennis courts. The entire area west of the railroad at Inwood
Hill Park extending from Dyckman Street to the Harlem Ship Canal, will be
devoted exclusively to active recreation. Promenades and winding foot paths
with benches under shade trees will be available for pedestrians and those
seeking rest and quiet. Plans have also been developed for marine
recreational facilities in the form of four boat basins located respectively
at 79th Street, 96th Street, 148th Street and Dyckman Street. All but the
148th Street basin which will be under the jurisdiction of the Commissioner
of Docks, will be operated by the Department of Parks. The basins at 79th
and 96th Streets are actually under construction.

                     The opening of the West Side Improvement through
Riverside and Fort Washington Parks from 72nd to Dyckman Streets will
provide at a total cost of $24,340,000., an immediate usable section of a
great marginal waterfront development.  132 acres of new park land valued at
$30,000,000., have been made by filling land under water and covering of the
railroad tracks.  Approximately 3,000,000 cubic yards of fill from exterior
sources have been used.

                      The new upper level of the Henry Hudson Bridge now
under construction, and which will provide one-way traffic to motorists
northward bound, will be completed in May of 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 27, 1937


              The Department of Parks announces that a report of its revenue
producing facilities, which include 368 tennis courts, 10 golf courses,
12 swimming pools, 2 beaches and Randall's Island Stadium, by comparison
over a period of four years operation, indicates a steady and consistent
gain in usage by the public and revenue to the City. This gain is shown
by figures compiled by the Department, based on operations for the years,
1934, 1935, 1936 and 1937.

                                   POOLS

              During 1934, the two swimming pools---Faber Pool in Richmond,
and Betsy Head in Brooklyn, attracted a total of 128,765 persons with a
resulting revenue of $9,248.  In 1935 there were 104,899 patrons, resulting
in a revenue of $8,398.  The year 1936 saw 10 additional pools opened by the
Department as follows:

IN MANATTAN   Hamilton Fish Pool         East Houston & Sheriff Streets.
              Colonial Pool              Bradhurst Ave. 145th to 147th Sts.
              Highbridge Pool            Amsterdam Ave. & 173rd Street
              Thomas Jefferson Pool      111th to 114th Sts.to 1st Ave.

IN BROOKLYN   Sunset Pool                7th Avenue and 43rd Street
              McCarren Pool              Nassau Ave. & Lorimer Street.
              Red Hook Pool              Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets

THE BRONX     Crontona Pool              173rd St. & Fulton Avenue

IN QUEENS     Astoria Pool               Barclay St. & 24th Drive

     and

IN RICHMOND   Tompkinsville Pool         Arrietta St. at Pier #6


              While they were not opened in time for a full full season's
operation, 1,777,860 people used the facilities and 1936, with a total
income of $177.270.  In 1937 with all pools (except Betsy Head in Brooklyn)
operating a full season, the attendence records show 2,391,600 persons used
the swimming pool facilities, with a total revenue to the City of
$255,000. Of the total attendance, 765,250 were children admitted free each
weekday morning.  The fact that the income does not balance the operating
and maintenance costs this year by approximately $20,000 is due primarily to
the operation of the bathhouses and drained pools as free play centers
during the non-swimming season, or 10% of the year, although revenues were
also reduced because of a fire which destroyed the bathhouse at Betsy Head
Pool in Brooklyn early in August, necessarily limiting the usage of this
facility. A new structure has been planned and will be ready for use for the
1953 season.

         The increase of usage and resultant revenue of swimming pools in
this Department during the past four years is as follows:

        Year                      Total Income               Attendance

        1934                      $     9,248.73               128,765

        1935                            6,598.14               104,339

        1936                          177,270.13             1,777,860

        1937                          255,000.00             2,391,609


                                  BEACHES


         Jacob Riis Park, on the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, and Orchard
Beach in Pelham Bay Park, The Bronx, have completed a highly successful
operating season showing gains in popularity ana income.  In 1934 end 1935,
Jacob Ells Park was the only revenue producing beach front equipped for
bathing under this Department's jurisdiction. On July 25, 1936, Orchard
Beach wras opened with a bathhouse accommodating 6,800 people, a parking
space for 4,000 cars and a newly made white sand beach. Jacob Riis Park was
completely reconstructed, the beach being enlarged, the bathhouse renovated,
and boardwalk, pitch and putt golf course and beach games added.

         The season just closed attracted 4,248,400 visitors to the two
beaches with a resultant revenue to the City of $137,800.  These facilities
show a profit of $61,900 over operating and maintenance costs
notwithstanding the fact that they were not opened until June 25th of this
year, a loss of four weeks operation.

         The following figures show the gain in attendance and revenue,
inclusive, over the past four yeaeration at the beaches:


                                      Year      Total Income    Attendance

Jacob                                 1934         71,883          500,000

Jacob Riis Park                       1935         39,907          500,000

Orchard Beach and Jacob Riis Park     1936         89,917         1,555,000

Orchard Beach and Jacob Riis Park     1937         107,000        4,248,400

          There are ten golf courses operated by the Department of Parks,
of which three have been built since 1934, while the seven old ones have
been modernized.      They show a substantial increase in usage and income over
previous years, with 1937 showing a profit of $23,000 ever the maintenance
and operation costs.

          The following figures show the comparison over a period covering
the past four years:


              Year            Total Income              Attendance

              1934               161,200                  345,107

              1935               124,171                  321,840

              1936               172,573                  447,409

              1937               230,000                  595,000 (estimated)


                                   TENNIS

           The tennis courts of this Department have enjoyed increased
attendance, ana while not yet showing a profit over maintenance and operation
costs, do show a consistent increase in revenue. The gain in permits and 
income in the 1934 - 1937 period follows:


                      Year        Total Income             Permits

                      1934          $37,173                 15,781

                      1935           41,913                 15,684

                      1936           40,087                 18,584

                      1937           54,110                 19,992


           The current year shows an operating and ;naintenanee deficit of
approximately $3,800.


                          RANDALL'S ISLAND STADIUM

           The Municipal Stadium located on Randall's Island in the East
River opened on July 11, 1936 with the Olympic triAls. TherE was little
further summer activity, and after three weeks of light opera, a short
football season closed the Stadium activities for 1936. During the 1936
season, 234,900 persons visited the Stadium, and $13,495 was derived in
revenue from all sources.

           The 1937 season to date shows an attendance of 282,350 persons
and a total income of $27,l90.  While this income is about $22,000 under the
operating and maintenance costs at this site the deficit should be
substantially lowered by a series of football games now scheduled for
afternoons and nights.  The first game was played last Wednesday night.

           In the future, the Parks Department will only enter into
profitsharing agreements for the use of the Stadium instead of the type
entered into in the past, which, in order to popularize its use, only
guaranteed the City's expenses for the particular event scheduled.

        The opera season this year, while originally scheduled to start on
June 29th, was delayed four weeks due to labor difficulties within the
theatrical profession. The operettas presented proved one of the most
successful and popular events of the Stadium season. The performances were
highly publicized by the producers, and on several occasions it was
necessary to turn away as many as 5,000 persons.  The two day I.C.A.A.A.A.
track meet and the Labor Carnival also proved successful, with several
long-standing records being broken in the former.

                                 - E N D -
COPY

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 20, 1937


Interstate Sanitation Commission
60 Hudson Street
New York City

Gentlemen:

           In connection with the present hearing on waters in the Hudson
River from Palisades Interstate Park south to the Narrows, I should like to
call your attention to park developments now approaching completion or
planned for construction in the near future. These developments involve the
use of the actual water front and will be vitally affected by the quality of
the water.

           The West Side Improvement and Henry Hudson Parkway projects
include all of the Hudson River frontage of Manhattan Island from West 72nd
Street northward. Within this stretch plans have been developed for four
Boat Basins, located respectively at 79th Street, 96th Street, 148th Street
and Dyckman Street. All but the 148th Street Basin, which will be under the
jurisdiction of the Commissioner of Docks, will be operated by the
Department of Parks. The basins at 79th and 96th Streets are actually under
construction. We have previously, at these hearings, called to your
attention the subject of boat basins for small pleasure craft, and the
bearing of the quality of water upon the proper usage of such facilities.

           Actual construction under way or completed on the West Side
Improvement includes- nearly three miles of promenade built in the bulkhead
line in the following locations:

                  West 72nd to West 83rd Streets
                  West 91st to West 116th Streets
                  West 158th Street to Fort Washington Park

           Other water front developments in this section about to be opened
to the public include children's playgrounds, athletic fields and tennis
courts. The entire area, west of the Railroad at Inwood Hill Park, extending
from Byckraan Street to the Harlem Ship Canal, will be devoted entirely to
active recreation.

           The rocky shore at Fort Washington Park is being developed for
the purpose of restoring und preserving its natural scenic beauty as an area
for passive recreation. The object of such a development is practically
defeated by water pollution.

            I recommend, therefore, that your Commission designate the
waters of the Hudson River between the Harlem Ship Canal and West 72nd
Street as Class "A".


                                      Yours very truly,

                                      /s/    ROBERT MOSES
                                                       Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 20, 1937


              The Department of Parks announces that it has erected stands
for the American Legion Convention Corporation for use during the parade on
September 21st at the following locations:

              Between 40th and 42nd Streets in front of the New York Public
Library, 4000 seats for use by the Legion and reserved for disabled veterans
and Gold Star Mothers.

              Between 58th and 59th Streets, a reviewing stand seating 100
for use by the Legion for the reviewing officials, and also at the same
location, accommodations for newspaper reporters and photographers.

              Between 64th and 65th Streets in front of the Arsenal,
bleachers seating 1000 for city officials only. As tickets for this stand
have already been distributed to the various city officials and no more are
available, the Department of Parks requests that the public, city employees
and officials refrain from phoning or making any further application for
them.

              Besides these stands the Department of Parks has issued a
permit to the American Legion Convention Corporation to erect stands seating
18,000 on the west side of Fifth Avenue from 59th to 79th Streets. Tickets
for these stands are for sale at the Legion Headquarters - 3000 seats at
$2.50 each, 10,000 seats at $2.00 each, 2500 seats at $1.50 each, and 2500
seats at $1.00 each.

                                    END

September 17, 1937

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release Immediately
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 17, 1937

                The Park Department announces the formal opening of the
Conservatory Gardens in Central Park at 5th Avenue and 105th
Street, Manhattan, on Saturday, September 18th at 12:30 P.M.

                Besides Park Commissioner Robert Moses, Dr. John H. Finley,
Editor of the "New York Times", will speak at the ceremonies.

                A large formal flower garden was one of the original
stipluations for the Central Park design competition, held in 1857.
It was never built and the present improvement may be considered the
fulfillment of this requirement after a lapse of eight years.

                The existing design consists of a hedge-bordered central
grass panel flanked on the north and south by flower gardens and double rows
of mature flowering crab apple trees, which were brought down the Hudson on
barges from an upstate orchard.

                The west end of the central panel terminated by a fountain
pool and a semi-circular treatment of three terraces surmounted by a wrought
iron pergola.  Mature wisteria vines, presented to the Park Department by
Mr. Hunder K. Sekine, Medford, Long Island, N.Y., are planted against this
ornamental structure.  Each of the three terraces contains Japanese Yew
hedge forming a solid bank of foliage to frame the fountain.

                The central feature of the south flower garden is an
ornamental pool containing water lilies and surrounded by a boxwood hedge.
In the pool is a small bronze fountain, commemorating Frances Hodgson
Burnett, which was dedicated by Mayor LaGuardia on May 28th, 1937.
The sculptress was Miss Bessie Vonneh.

                The north flower garden also contains a lily pond, around
which are grouped four geometrical flower beds.  The outlying border
features a permanent plantation of trailing roses.

                Throughout the growing season the garden will present floral
displays in season, starting with spring bulbs, followed by summer flowering
annuals, and displaying chrysanthemums in the fall.  The south garden will
feature a collection of herbaceous perennials, among which are grouped a
quantity of striking new delphinium hybrids developed by Dr. V. Simkovitch
and presented by him to the Park Department.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 17, 1937


                 The Park department announces the opening of Horace Harding
Boulevard from Queens Boulevard through Flushing Meadow Park to Rodman
Street, on Saturday, September 18th, at 11:00 A. M.

                 Formal exercises will be held on the westerly end of the
new roadway just east of Queens Boulevard.  Besides Park Commissioner Moses,
who will preside, Grover A. Whalen, President of the New York World's Fair,
George U. Harvey, President of the Borough of Queens, Raymond V. Ingersoll
and Joseph J. Darcy, District Engineer, New York State Department of Public
Works, will speak.

                 The story of Horace Harding Boulevard dates back to 1923,
when a group of citizens headed by J. Horace Harding, provided funds for a
topographical survey. In 1924 a final map was submitted to, and adopted by
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, and grading was begun by the city
in 1926. In the fall of 1928 a thirty-foot asphalt roadway was completed
between the east end of Strong's Causeway and the Nassau County line.

                 Since that time, this important city artery has lain
relatively idle, throttled by the lack of a connection from the west at
Queens Boulevard.  In Nassau County, the state authorities, recognizing the
potential value of this thoroughfare, proceeded with the improvement of its
extension from the city line to Mineola Avenue.

                 The Horace Harding Boulevard project within the city
limits was resurrected last year when the State Legislature under Chapter
465 of the Laws of 1936 provided funds for the construction by the State
Department of Public Works of various street, highway, bridge and other
basic improvements in connection with the development of Flushing Meadow
Park as the site for the New York World's Fair in 1939. Immediately contract
plans and specifications for the completion of Horace Harding Boulevard
between Queens Boulevard and the east end of Flushing Meadow Park were begun
under the supervision of the City Park Department. Construction contracts
were let forthwith, and with an additional appropriation provided by the
State Legislature this year under Chapter 125 of the Laws of 1937, the
entire project including grading, drainage, paving and bridges has rapidly
progressed, and is completed and will be opened tomorrow for public use.

                  The new project provides twin roadways of concrete from
Queens Boulevard for a distance of two miles easterly to and through the
Flushing Meadows, where it connects with the older section of Horace Harding
Boulevard paved in 1928. The section through Flushing Meadow Park passes
over the Grand Central Parkway Extension on a double span stone-faced
bridge, under the pedestrian bridge provided by the World's Fair across the
Boulevard, and finally over Flushing Creek on a seven-span steel and
concrete structure.

              While the proposed World's Fair provided the necessary
incentive to complete Horace Harding Boulevard to afford a direct connection
between Queens Boulevard and the Fair grounds, the need for opening up this
important artery for the relief of traffic congestion in Queens has become
pressing. Traffic conditions on existing parallel highways such as Northern
Boulevard, Roosevelt Avenue and the Grand Central Parkway have already
reached the saturation point. The completion of the westerly section of
Horace Harding Boulevard will help materially to ease traffic movement in
the Borough of Queens.

                                   E N D

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                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                                                      WILLIAM R. C. WOOD
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                                                      JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                       
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         

                                                            September 16, 1937


       The Park Department is erecting a grandstand between 64th and 65th
Streets directly in front of the Arsenal headquarters of the Department for
seating city and state officials during the parade of the American Legion
which will be held September 21st.

       The number of seats are extremely limited, as the balance of the
blocks on 5th Avenue have been turned over to the American Legion for the
erection of stands for sale to the general public.

       I enclose tickets for your use.

       If for any reason you will be unable to use any or all of these
tickets, I would appreciate it greatly if they could be returned to me, as
the demand for additional seats is undoubtedly going to be tremendous owing
to the limited facilities available.

                                   Cordially,

                                         Commissioner

Attach.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 11, 1937


                     The Department of Parks announces the closing for
swimming of the twelve pools and two beaches under its jurisdiction on
September 12, 1937, Parking facilities and games areas including the pitch
putt golf course at Jacob Riis Park will be kept open throughout the month
of September.

                      Immediately after closing the pools, they will be
converted into active play areas and reopened for use on Saturday, September
18th. Facilities v/ill be provided for 47 paddle tennis, 50 shuffle board,
12 basket ball, 44 handball courts and various group games.  It is planned
to have leagues formed in these sports and regularly scheduled games
betvro.cn clubs.  These play centers will be opened frem to the public from
2 P.M. until 10 P.M. daily excopt on Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays when
the hours of operation will be from 10 A.M. until 6 P.M.  Last year the
facilities were used by 2,021,100 persons.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 11, 1937

                        BARBER SHOP QUARTET CONTEST


    The Department of Parks wishes to announce that the Third Annual
American Ballad Contest will take place at Randall's Island Stadium, Sunday,
September 12th at 8 P.M., in conjunction with the opera "Roberta".

   As the result of elimination contests, there are two champion quartets
from each borough in the finals in addition to one quartet from Jones Beach.

    There has been great interest in all the elimination contests and it is
expected that a large attendance will be attracted to Randall's Island on
Sunday evening.

    The quartets will start to sing at 8 P.M. sharp.  Each quartet will
render their selections between the acts and during the intermissions of the
opera.  Five minutes will be allowed each quartet to sing one or two songs.

   The names of the quartets, together with the individual names of each
quartet, are as follows:

           DECK OFFICERS' QUARTET - JONES BEACH

              1.    Stuart Stocker
              2.    Jack Cunningham
              3.    Roy Ccrdan
              4.    Harry Tompkins


            THE LITTLE SHAVERS - BRONX

               l.   Dan Murphy
               2.   William Nerich
               3.   George Lehr
               4.   Charles Thuern


            THE FOUR SPEED DEMONS - BRONX

               1.   Georgge White
               2.   Walter Lange
               3.   Ceorge Miller
               4.   Ray Bissinber

            THE FOUR JAYS - QUEENS

               1.   Julian Klucznik
               2.   James Caden
               3.   Joseph Weidner
               4.   John Weidner

           BLESSED SACRAMENT LYCEUM - QUEENS

               1.    John F. Fitzsimmons
               2.    John J. Bradt
               3.    Henry Rotanz
               4.    Vincent De Mayo

          HANK'S MELODY BOYS - RICHMOND

               1.    Arthur Eriekson
               2.    Roy Eriekson
               3.    Hank Eriekson
               4.    Loif Eriekson

          THE MELODIERS - RICHMOND

               1.    Pat Thompson
               2.    Richard Swanson
               3.    Leif Swanson
               4.    Edwin Nolson

          THE COLUMBIANS - MANHATTAN

               1.    S. Vamvaketis
               2.    C Sylvester
               3.    J. Smith
               4.    H. Smith

          GREEN BROTHERS QUARTET - MANHATTAN

               1.    Channel Green
               2.    Uarron Green
               3.    Robert Green
               4.    Peter Green


          SELAH JUBILEE QUARTET - BROOKLYN

               1.    T. Ruth
               2.    N. Townsley
               3.    A. Antley
               4.    C. Antley


          TRI-BORO QUARTET - BROOKLYN

               1.    Milton Lackenbauer
               2.    Harry Kay
               3.    Otto Ziegler
               4.    James Ricca

     The following prizes will be awarded to the winning quartets:

                  1st - Electric Clocks
                  2nd - Electric Razors
                  3rd - Combination Brush, Comb and Razor Sets

     Metallic ash trays will be awarded to each member of the eight
remaining quartets.

     The Judges at this contest will be:

                  1. Mayor Fiorollo H. La Guardia
                  2. Park Commissioner Robert Moses
                  3. Dr. Sigmund Spaeth
                  4. Mr. Luther C. Steward

                                   E N D


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 10, 1937


                     The Park Department will officially open to the public at
3 P.M. on Saturday, September 11th, the new Williamsbridge Reservoir
Playground, located at 208th Street and Bainbridge Avenue, the Bronx.

                     Besides Park Commissioner Moses, Capt. Howard
L. Peckham, Deputy Works Progress Administrator of New York City, Borough
President James J. Lyons of the Bronx and Alderman John C. McGinley of the
32nd District, who will speak at the ceremonies, there will be a parade and
dances participated in by 200 children from Park Department playgrounds
throughout The Bronx.  Starting at 4 P.M. there will be track events and
tennis matches, followed by a football scrimmage between the Varsity teams
of Fordham University and Manhattan College.  At 4:35 there will be an open
1000 yard medley relay race in which the New York Curb Exchange, Lenox Hill,
New York Pioneer, Grand Street Boys and New York Athletic Clubs will
participate. At 4:45 the ceremonies will close with an invitation mile in
which Glenn Cunningham, America's most consistent miler, will participate.

                 This 19.7 acre oval-shaped depressed area, formerly the
Williamsbridge Reservoir, was acquired by transfer from the Department of
Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, through the Commissioners of the Sinking
Fund on June 27, 1934, for recreation purposes, with the stipulation that no
swimming pool would be constructed on the site. The present development
started in 1935 and was completed to its present stage with relief forces
and funds.  It includes a four laps to the mile cinder running track, a ball
diamond, a football field, 16 hard-surfaced tennis courts, 2 large
completely equipped playgrounds, a wading pool and a granite faced
reinforced concrete recreation building and field house. This building is
largely constructed from stone taken out of the old reservoir, a most
economical and attractive material for the purpose. Leading up to the street
level are ramps, landscaped slopes, walks with ample benches under shade
trees for those seeking passive recreation, and also a one-half mile
promenade for pedestrians. The northern portion of the area, which is being
developed with shade trees, benches and walks for quiet relaxation will be
completed and opened to the public in December.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 10, 1937


                    The Department of Parks announces the informal opening
today of a new playground at 30th Road between 45th and 46th Streets,
Astoria, Queens, making a total of 236 playgrounds added to the Park
Department recreational system since the beginning of the present
administration. Prior to January 1934 there were 108 playgrounds in the park
system. The total number now available is 344.

                    This area is one of twenty-four sites selected by the
Commissioner of Parks, and acquired by condemnation after authorization by
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, July 15, 1936, to take care of the
recreational needs of neglected neighborhoods.

                    The present development which includes a completely
equipped small children's playground as well as handball courts for older
children and benches for mothers and guardians, is the first part of the
development of the entire block bounded by 30th Road, 31st Avenue and 45th
and 46th Streets, the balance of which has been acquired by the Board of
Education as a site for a Junior High School.  The Department of Parks and
the Board of Education are cooperating jointly to develop the expanded area
to take care of the active recreational needs of all ages of this thickly
populated neighborhood, as well as those attending the school. When
completed it is planned to have, besides the playground opening today, two
soft ball diamonds, volley ball, paddle tennis and basketball courts. The
entire development including the school building will fit into a
comprehensive scheme and will be bordered with a narrow fence enclosed
landscaped area with shade trees.

                     Ultimately the playground will be divided into two
sections, one for small children, the other for adolescents. The adolescent
area will be adjacent to the school and during school hours will be used
exclusively by the students. After school hours and during summer months,
this area will be open to the general public and will be operated by the
Department of Parks. The playground for small children will be under the
jurisdiction of the Park Department continuously and open at all tines to
the public. It will be operated under regular Park Department rules which
apply to all recreation areas.
                                      
                                 END

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                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                                                      WILLIAM R. C. WOOD
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                                                      JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                       
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         

                                                            September 8, 1937

Interstate Sanitation Commission
60 Hudson Street
New York City

Gentlemen:-

           In connection with your present hearing on waters adjacent to the
shores of Brooklyn and Queens from Sanford Point to the Narrows, the Park
Department has one water front development directly affected and a number
which may be affected indirectly by these waters.

           Attached is a print of a plan of which you have received copies
at former hearings, on v?hich the area under consideration is indicated in
brown crayon, the park development directly affected in rod, and the other
park developments, indirectly affected, in green.

           Preliminary plans have been prepared for a basin for small boats,
to be constructed in connection with the redevelopment of Shore Drive and
Park, along the east shore of the Narrows.  The basin will be of the same
type as others now under construction at various points in the city, and
will be for the accommodation of pleasure boats. The necessity for having
the waters in the vicinity of this type of basin of reasonable purity is
obvious and has been fully presented at former hearings, so that it should
not be necessary to go into the problem in full detail at this time.

           You are already familiar with the boat basins under construction
in Flushing Bay, and with the bathing beach proposed for future development
at Dyker Beach Park on the east shore of Gravesend Bay. These developments
are within the areas which would be affected on account of tidal and current
action, if the waters being considered et your present hearing are polluted.

           The Department has also under its jurisdiction a major park and
swimming pool development along the east shore of Hell Gate in Astoria; a
fully developed park area in Rainey Park on the east shore of the East River
at 34th Avenue, Queens; a large park development ?dth swimming pool,
athletic and general recreation areas at the Henry Street Basin in the Red
Hook section of Brooklyn; a major park development at Owl's Head, Brooklyn;
and a park and parkway devclcpmcnt for which plans are now being prepared,
and on vhich construction vd.ll start within a few months, along the east
shore of the Narrows from Owl's Head to Fort Hamilton.

          Those areas, although they make no direct use of their natural
water frontages, art affected indirectly by the condition of the
water. Particularly at Rainey Park, the present pollution of the water is
most offensive, and unless the natural waters on which all of these areas
front are reasonably clean, the public will not get full benefit from these
park developments.

          I recommend, therefore, that your Commission designate the waters
of the East River f;rom Governor's Island to Hell Gate as Class "B" and the
balance of the waters under consideration at your present hearing as Class
"A".

                                     Very truly yours,

                                     (Robert Moses signature)
                                     Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                        For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           September 8, 1937

                                                           September 8th, 1937


Interstate Sanitation Commission
60 Hudson Street
New York City

Gentlemen:

                 In connection with your present hearing on waters adjacent to
the shores of Brooklyn and Queens from Sanford Point to the Narrows, the Park
Department has one water front development directly affected and a number
which may be affected indirectly by these waters.

                 Attached is a print of a plan of which you have received
copies at former hearings, on which the area under consideration is
indicated in brown crayon, the park development directly affected in red,
and the other park developments, indirectly affected, in green.

                  Preliminary plans have been prepared for a basin for small
boats, to be constructed in connection with the redevelopment of Shore Drive
and Park, along the east shore of the Narrows. The basin will be of the same
type as others now under construction at various points in the city, and
will be for the accommodation of pleasure boats. The necessity for having
the waters in the vicinity of this type of basin of reasonable purity is
obvious and has been fully presented at former hearings, so that it should
not be necessary to go into the problem in full detail at this time.

                      You are already familiar with the boat basins under
construction in Flushing Bay, and with the bathing beach proposed for future
development at Dyker Beach Park on the east shore of Gravosend Bay.  These
developments are within the areas which would be affected on account of
tidal and current action, if the waters being considered at your present
hearing are polluted.

                      The Department has also under its jurisdiction a major
park and swimming pool development along the east shore of Hell Gate in
Astoria; a fully developed park area in Rainey Park on the east shore of the
East River at 34th Avenue, Queensj a large park development with swimming
pool, athletic and general recreation areas at the Henry Street Basin in the
Red Hook section of Brooklyn; a major park development at Owl's Head,
Brooklyn; and a park and parkway development for which plans are now being
prepared, and on which construction will start within a few months, along
the east shore of the Narrows from Owl's Head to Fort Hamilton.

                      These areas, although they make no direct use of their
natural water frontages, are affected indirectly by the condition of the
water.  Particularly at Rainey Park, the present pollution of the water is
most offensive, and unless the natural waters on which all of these areas
front are reasonably clean, the public will not get full benefit from these
park developments.

                      I recommend, therefore, that your Commission designate
the waters of the East River from Governor's Island to Hell Gate as Class
"B" and the balance of the waters under consideration at your present
hearing as Class "A",

                                           Very truly yours,

                                           /s/    ROBERT MOSES

                                                        COMMISSIONER

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    September 3, 1937


                     The Department of Parks announces that on Wednesday,
September 8th, at 8:30 P.M. on the Mall, Central Park, the finals of the
Hill Billy Contest will take place. This contest will bring forth many
heretofore unknowm Hill Billy artists. In each group there are from 3 to 6
players and singers. Inasmuch as each champion troupe represents some local
community or institution in the city, it is expected that on Wednesday,
there will be approximately 10,000 in attendance at the Mall.

                     An added feature of this contest will be "Ted's Gang"
from Jones Beach and the "Red Bank Hill Billies" of New Jersey.  Other
competitors include the "O'Connell Hill Billies" and the "Brown Jug
Mountaineers" of Queens; the "Lincoln Center Rhythm Band" of Manhattan; the
"St. James Hill Billies" and the "Mosholu Mountaineers" of The Bronx; "Slim
and His Bar 'X' Rangers" of Staten Island, and "Chick and Charlie" and "Zeb
and Zeke" of Brooklyn,

                     The judges will be Fields and Hall of the
"Streamliners" and Zeke Manners of "Zeke and His Gang". Other persons who
have been invited to act in this capacity are Colonel Jack Major, Bill
Butler and Zeb Carver.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 27, 1937


                The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announced today that the
4,000,000th car passed over the Henry Hudson Bridge at 2:50 P.M.

                In accordance with the custom previously established, a
fifty-trip booklet was given free to Wm. A. Ohlsen, the driver of the
4,000,000th car. Ohlsen is a chauffeur and butler for Dr. George A. Wyeth,
and was returning from Manhattan to the doctor's residence at Maplelawn in
Riverdale-on-the-Hudson.

                Traffic has been so heavy since the opening of this bridge
on December 14th, 1936, that the Authority has been successful in completing
a second bond issue for the construction of additional roadways and an upper
deck to the bridge. Two contracts have already been let for the grading and
paving of an additional roadway through Inwood Hill Park and a pedestrian
underpass. Additional contracts will be advertised in the early part of
September for the construction of the upper level of the bridge, which has
already been designed and the widening and landscaping of the parkway
through the Spuyten Duyvil area in the Bronx. The now roadways and bridge
will be completed and ready in the spring of 1938 for the anticipated
increase in traffic upon the completion of the West Side Improvement from
72nd Street to Dyckman Street.

                                    END

August 27th, 1937.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 26, 1937

           The Department of Parks announces that it will conduct the finals
of the children's amateur singing contest on Friday, August 27th, at 2:30
P.M. on the Mall in Central Park.

           Preliminary auditions have been conducted in the playgrounds
since the vacation period started.  Contestants have been divided into two
age groups - 8 to 12 years, and 13 to 16 years. At the final borough
eliminations, two winners from each group were selected to compete in the
finals.

           Gold and silver medals will be awarded to the winners in each
class. The remaining borough finalists will receive bronze medals.

           Mr. Alberto Bimboni, Director of the Orpheus Glee Club of
Philadelphia and Flushing, N.Y.; Mr. Randolph Hanson, Director of the
University Glee Club and Mrs. A. L. Wolbarst, Chairman of City Music League
Auditions will act as Judges of this competition.

                                # # # # # #

August 26th, 1937.

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                              CITY OF NEW YORK
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                           ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK

                                                    August 25, 1937.

To the New York Herald Tribune:

              An article appeared in your issue of last Sunday re-
garding what was styled a "current controversy5' between the Board
of Education and myself.

                   The person who prepared it missed the pointt and confused
the issue by injecting, on his own accord, controversial opinions which do
not enter into the picture, and by talking about recreational areas which he
says really come under the jurisdiction of other city departments and the
Police Athletic League.  The issue is not at all involved. I have pointed
out the lack of coordination of the city's recreational facilities and have
made certain suggestions, among which was the perfectly obvious one of
opening up closed play areas under the jurisdiction of the Board of
Education, which were built at great cost to meet the recreational needs of
the immediate neighborhoods.

                 To inject a new element into the discussion, as was
done by your writer when he expounded the philosophy of "passive"
and "active" park area, does not help the problem at all. There
must be give and take, and it all boils down to the inalienable
right of the children of the city to play, and what public spaces
should be devoted to this purpose.  I believe it to be axiomatic
that, in order to preserve the passive  features of parkes, children
and adolescents must be provided adequate active spaces to
keep them from wrecking the lawns and planted areas in their exuberance.

              The notions that "the Board of Education regards its
playgrounds as educational institutions," and that organization of a
playground from their point of view requires elaborate supervision for such
features as singing, patriotic exercises, talks by directors, handiwork,
housekeeping, tap dancing and sowing are just the bunk.  While I do not
decry the cultural features in recreational areas and, as a natter of fact,
sponsor many such activities in our program, I feel that the major purpose
to be served is to give healthy children adequate opportunity for
development of their bodies in proper surroundings.

              I also believe that the children themselves have a pretty good
idea of how to play without formal instructions in this art, and that they
resent regimentation.  For instance, at our running tracks at Macombs Dam,
Van Cortlandt and Williamsbridge Parks in the Bronx, McCarren Park in
Brooklyn, and Forest Park in Queens, we do not provide trainers but we do
sponsor races.  We don't need professors of ballistics to teach the average
New York boy how to play baseball; instructors of mechanical engineering to
conduct classes in top-spinning; or associate professors of mathematics to
apply the principles of plane geometry to show playground children how to
shoot marbles.  Our supervisors, therefore, find that their principal duty
lies in seeing that the games and exercise of the children are conducted in
a fair and orderly manner.  I have found no difficulty in obtaining the
services of a high type of personnel for just this purpose from the
playground directors' list established by the Municipal Civil Service
Commission.

               Your writer made no reference to the vicious custodian system
which throttles the use of many facilities, nor did he mention the top-heavy
bureaucratic sot-up of the Board of Education, which relishes red tape as
its major dish and which makes every Principal a little policy-deciding king
with apparent defiance of centralized control.  He also omitted the fact
that the recreational staff in the schools is given a ten-week summer
vacation, which is taken when the closed facilities stand in greatest need
of being thrown open to the children.

                The 1938 budget request of the Department of Parks made
public yesterday, is not unique in its proposed increases.  If the greatly
expanded recreational facilities of the city are to be operated, it will be
reflected in rising budgets unless there is a complete coordination of every
city department, board and bureau interested in recreation in utilizing
every available person they have for the full operation of publicly owned
recreational facilities.  There is no sense in pyramiding costs by the
operation of play areas which duplicate each other, nor by the short-sighted
policy which does not draw to the utmost on the tremendous reservoir of
trained people in the Board of Education to operate the facilities which are
kept closed.  The sooner that the Board of Education realizes its duty, uses
its recreational staff to the greatest advantage and provides personnel to
operate the closed play areas, the sooner will the general recreational
problem of the city be met.  If their action is not voluntary, it should be
forced by the executives of the city, or, if necessary, by enlightened
public opinion.

                                 /s/           ROBERT MOSES

                                          Commissioner of Parks

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 25, 1937


           The Park Department now that its four year program of expansion and
improvement of park facilities is nearing completion has again carefully
analyzed the requirements for police protection.

            It has been obvious that insufficient park and police personnel
has been a factor in the poor appearance of parks and has been primarily
responsible for vandalism and crime. Many of the small as well as the large
parks have been positively unsafe for visitors especially at night. The cost
of vandalism in the park system has been more than half a million dollars
annually.  Copper and brass fittings are constantly being stolen, benches
broken, shrubs, flowers and trees and lawn areas ruined. Statuary is in a
constant state of disrepair due to the theft of bronze pieces and breakage
by vandals who seem to take particular delight in climbing upon them.
Restricted lawm areas and sidewalks are constantly being used for ball
playing, bicycling and roller skating with the result that lawns are ruined
and the walks are unsafe for pedestrians or those seeking quiet and rest on
adjacent benches. Cases of holdups and assaults are frequent. Unlicensed
peddlers without proper Health Department food handlers permits are almost
impossible to control.

           There are many things in a park system which ordinary park
attendants cannot do and which require the respect and authority which go
only with the policeman's uniform. Unless an adequate police force is
assigned to the parks we cannot hope to improve present conditions
materially and to cope with the minority of disorderly and destructive
persons who interfere with the orderly enjoyment of park facilities by the
majority.

           Additional police will be required in 1938 not only to protect
the existing facilities but also many new ones which will be completed
during the balance of this year and during the first part of 1938. The 48
additional playgrounds to be built before the end of this year will bring
the total of these areas to 384, an increase of 300 percent in the four
years of this Administration. All of these will require the vigilance of
patrolmen, and in the case of improved and enlarged parks, definite and
constant assignment of full tine police.

             The completion of the Hutchinson River Parkway through Pelhan
Bay Park, The Bronx, and the West Side Improvement in Manhattan, will
require additional police. In addition, Randall's Island with its operas,
the 12 swimming pools and the completed development of Orchard Beach in
Pelhan Bay Park and Jacob Riis Park on the Rockaway Peninsula, are
attracting unusually large crowds of people and need more police to enforce
ordinances and prevent vandalism.

             While Police Commissioner Valentine has cooperated in every way
with the Park Department, he, himself, has been so short of men and officers
that he has not been able to afford the protection which the parks need.  It
is obvious that the needs of past years have increased materially and in
order to help the Police Department obtain sufficient nen to give adequate
coverage to city parks, Park Department officials are appearing at the
budget hearing today to aid the Police Commissioner in obtaining the
necessary additional patrolmen.

             The present inadequate assignment of 496 patrolmen to city
parks must be brought up to 694 for the winter months and 1,027 for the
summer months if vandalism is to be eliminated and the parks made safe for
the public. As repeatedly stated in connection with the park budget, there
is no sense in expanding the city recreational systen to meet insistent
public demands unless our citizens are prepared to pay for proper
maintenance.  Sufficient police are just as much a requisite as sufficient
engineers, gardeners, laborers and playground directors.

                                    END

August 25, 19S7

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    April 24, 1937


                     MEMORANDUM ON 1938 BUDGET REQUEST
                                  FOR THE
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                              AUGUST 24, 1937


            In presenting the fourth budget request of the consolidated park
system of New York City, I want to call particular attention to the fact
that this request is based on the completion of a four year program of
expansion and improvement of park facilities with which everyone is
familiar.  We now know definitely what the physical inventory of our
five-borough plant will be on January 1st, 1938, and this budget request is
therefore based on actualities, unless a study of the new charter shows that
the Department of Parks is required to maintain certain areas now under the
jurisdiction of other agencies. I have asked the Corporation Counsel to
advise us on these charter questions. I have not included any of these
questionable areas in the preparation of the 1938 request, and if it is
decided that certain of them will fall under the jurisdiction of the
Department of Parks, a special supplemental budget request will be made.

            In 1934, the first year of the park consolidation, the budget of
the Park Department had reached a low of $4,656,710.07. It was immediately
obvious that this inadequate budget was a major contributing factor to the
shabby, uncared for appearance of the parks and to their unsatisfactory
operation. While facilities for all kinds of recreation, active and passive,
for all age groups were being expanded three-fold throughout the five
boroughs, subsequent budgets provided little increase. With the full
understanding of relief executives and of the city authorities, the deficit
was made up by the assignment of relief workers to the maintenance and
operation of parks, parkways and playgrounds, although I repeatedly warned
the responsible city officials that the relief work would some day stop and
that the problem of providing civil service employees for this work should
be met squarely.  In the spring of this year, the situation reached its
climax when an order of the Works Progress Administration withdrew all the
relief workers engaged in the maintenance and operation of the park system
and forced the closing of many playgrounds and the abandonment of
maintenance and repair in many park areas.

          This order brought home to the people of New York the fact that
sufficient personnel must be provided by the city if the expanded facilities
were to be operated.  The public answer was unmistakable. The Board of
Estimate and the Board of Aldernen, with the approval of the Mayor, made
available sufficient funds to replace the W.P.A. forces with regular
full-time city employees. As of July 1st, this increased personnel modified
our 1937 budget to a total of $7,717,324.75.

          As to the increase in the 1938 budget, the mandatory salary
increments and restorations amount to $177,700.00, and to continue the
additional forces allowed for the last six months of 1937, the amount
required is $506,320.00.  The Sharkey Bill placing the labor classes in this
Department on a per annum, instead of a per diem, basis has been reported
favorably by the Committee on Local Laws of the Municipal Assembly.  I am
heartily in favor of this bill as I believe that the employees under my
jurisdiction should receive the same consideration as these in other
departments. The effect of this measure on the 1938 budget will be to
increase it by $181,280.00. Adjustments in salaries for 47 individuals
amount to $15,572.00, and I call particular attention to the fact that only
9 of these merited increments are for the executives accountable for the
proper operation of the park system, and the $3,410.00 for these men is only
21% of the total adjustments.  There are no Deputy Commissioners in the
Department of Parks and the size of the staff in responsible control is
small.  The sum total of the above four items, which are required merely to
maintain the forces now employed, will bring the budget to #8,598,196.75.

             However, our construction program is not at a standstill and
many now facilities now undor way will be added to the park system.
Additional forces will be required to maintain these playgrounds and parks
which will be completed during the balance of the year and during the first
part of 1938.  48 additional playgrounds to be built before the end of the
year will.bring the total of these areas to 384 (an increase of over 300
percent in the four years of this Administration) .  The projects now boing
constructed under the 1937 Capital Outlay Budget will require additional
men.  The State Department of Public Works will complete the Hutchinson
River Parkway through Pelham Bay Park and turn it ever to the city.  Of
major importance, from a standpoint of now park facilities, will be the
completion this fall of the West Side Improvement, which is adding 132 acres
of intensively developed river front park to the city system.  The cost of
the services of the additional personnel required to maintain and operate
these totally new facilities amounts to $771,047.50.

             With the help of the various relief agencies, we have been able
to keep the physical plant of the park system in a good state of repair, but
the same order of the Relief Administrator that took the maintenance workers
away also put a stop to this repair work.  The 1937 budget provided for a
total of 154 mechanics throughout the five boroughs. This force is absurdly
inadequate for the amount of work that has to be done on the old, as well as
the new and expanded, facilities to keep them from rapid deterioration. For
instance, there is only one electrician allowed to the entire Borough of
Manhattan with its 154 park structures.  To keep park structures in the
proper state of repair to which the public has become accustomed will
renuire additional mechanical forces, the cost of which amounts to
$262,161.00.

             I have pointed out in former budget requests that there are more
than a million street trees whose care and maintenance is the responsibility
of the Park Department.  In addition to this vast number, thousands of new
trees have been set out during the last four years in parks and playgrounds
and along streets and parkways. Here, again, the various relief agencies
have been of great help to the Department but here, also, the men formerly
assigned have been withdrawn by order of the relief authorities.  To
continue the essential care of this forest of trees will require additional
climbers and pruners whose wages will amount to $231,042.00.

             In order to operate our full complement of automotive equipment
and the essential additions which we are now requesting, an increased force
of automobile enginemen will be necessary and their salaries will amount to
$140,760.00.

             The public is familiar with the changed anpearance of many of
the city monuments for whose care this Department is responsible.  The
restoration has been done by a small group of relief workers but they will
be withdrawn on December 31st of this year. Unless a small force of skilled
artisans is provided, the statues will again fall into the disrepair in
which they were found in January 1934. These employees will cost the city
$13,400.00 a year.

             This budget request includes a few new clerical and
semi-technical positions which are also occasioned by the discontinuance of
relief work in maintenance and operation, and for which the Board of
Estimate was asked to provide funds for the last six months of 1937.  These
funds were not provided and the new positions total $69,243.00.

             The foregoing increases represent practically all of the
additions to the personal service schedule for 1938, and they are for the
operation and maintenance of the free recreation facilities of the
Department.  The beaches, swimming pools, golf courses, tennis courts and
stadium, revenue producing facilities which pay for themselves and place no
burden on the taxpayer, will require no increase in personal service next
year.  On the contrary, we show a decrease of $4,336.75 which is based on
our experience in this year's successful operation.

             Coming now to materials, supplies, equipment, etc., I have
asked for an increase of $1,121,300,89.

             $566,778.00 or half of this total is for repairs to park
streets and roads.  We asked for these funds in the 1937 budget and withdrew
our request on the assurance of the Board of Estimate that they would be
provided by a combination of contributions from the relief authorities and
from the city.  Anyone riding over these pavements will bear witness to the
fact that this promise has not been kept.  I said before that no substantial
sums had been spent on the repair of these roads for the last six years
despite the fact that they carried as much, if not more traffic than many of
the streets which are under the jurisdiction of the various Borough
Presidents.  If these arteries are to remain open and are to provide a
reasonably safe means of travel, this sum must be included in the 1938
budget.

             Since 1934, only seven new pieces of automotive equipment have
been added to our inventory, which totals 367 units today.  It is obvious
that the life of such equipment is limited and, figured on five years
obsolescence, it would be necessary to replace 73 units each year. Such
replacements have not been made since 1934. We, however, are asking for the
replacement of only 42 units.  The greatly expanded facilities of the
Department require the addition of 51 new units and their cost, together
with the replacements, will be $128,730.00.

             Horticultural supplies formerly bought with relief funds,
recreational equipment which will be needed to replace the worn out swings
and slides, etc., additional fuel supplies for the many new buildings
constructed this year and the various materials, supplies and equipment
necessary adequately to maintain and operate the facilities which have been
added this year amount to $290,356.50.

             The foregoing additions in other than personal service are for
the free park facilities. When we built the now golf courses and completely
reconstructed the old ones, when we created the entirely new Orchard Beach
in The Bronx and rebuilt the inadequate Jacob Riis Park in the Rockaway
Peninsula of Queens, we assumed that the relief authorities would provide
the equipment necessary for the proper operation of these facilities.
However, the relief authorities refused to supply this equipment.  Items
such as automotive lawn mowers, compost mixers, etc., for the golf courses
and modern beach equipment for the two beaches are included in this request
for additional funds.  A substantial part of this increase is for equipment
which will bring adequate returns to the city. For instance, up to August
15th, we have received a return of $26,343.75 on the rental of beach chairs
and umbrellas. We need 2,000 more umbrellas and 1,000 more beach chairs next
year as this type of equipment does not last forever.

             The total increase over 1937 in other than personal service for
these revenue producing facilities is $135,436.39.  It does not represent a
real addition to the annual budget as a major proportion of the items are of
a nonexpendable character, good for many years of operation, and will, as in
the case of the beach umbrellas, produce additional revenues for the city.

          To summarize, the total request for 1938 is as follows:

             Personal Service                    $9,452,987.50

             Other Than Personal Service          1,775,250.89

             Total Budget Request for 1938       11,228,238.39


         As is required by charter, I also submit the Personal Service
Request for the Department for the first half of 1939 which, it will be
noted, is one-half of the required Personal Service of 1938.

                                            (Robert Moses signature)
                                            Commissioner

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 24, 1937


                  The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Harmonica Contest will be conducted on the Mall, Central Park, on Wednesday,
August 25, at 8:30 P.M.  Playground and district eliminations have been
going on for the past five weeks in each of the boroughs. At the final
borough eliminations, boys and girls competed in each of three groups: Class
A, under sixteen years, Class B, fifteen to eighteen years and Class C, over
eighteen years.

                  The two best players in each group were selected to
represent the boroughs at the finals. Each, contestant will be required to
play two selections not longer than four minutes each in duration.  The
Boy'* Harmonica Band of Queens will play a medley of three songs as an added
feature of the program.

                  Mr. Rudolph Wurlitzer, Miss Nicki Harmon of the Harmonica
Institute of America, and Miss Lee Edwards, Editor of the Accordian World
and Mr. Milt Herth, world's foremost exponent of the electric organ, have
been invited to judge this contest.

                                   E N D

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 23, 1937


               The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announces that bids were
taken today on paving the new upper level northbound approach from Dyckman
Street to the Henry Hudson Bridge. This contract is part of the widening
program from Dyckman Street to Riverdale Avenue in The Bronx, which also
includes placing an upper deck on the Henry Hudson Bridge for northbound
traffic which will be reached by the Parkway Drive on which bids were taken
today.

               Included in the bidding is a pedestrian underpass which will
permit visitors to Inwood Hill Park to proceed under both north and
southbound driveways, making the entire area of the park available for
pedestrians.

                 The three low bidders were:

                      The Immick Company, Inc .         $111,426.00
                      Meriden, Connecticut

                      Garofano Construction Co., Inc.    118,065.00
                      Mount Vernon, New York

                      Arthur Gallow, Inc.                118,835.00
                      260 East 161st Street
                      The Bronx, New York City

The Engineer's Estimate was $119,000.00.

                              #   #     #   #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 16, 1937


                                                            August 16th, 1937
Interstate Sanitation Commission
60 Hudson Street
New York City

Gentlemen:

               Submitted herewith are copy of letter of May 24th to your
Chairman, and print of map outlining the boating and bathing facilities
now in operation, and definitely planned, for development in city park
waterfront areas.

               In connection with your present hearing on waters south of
the Narrows, I call your particular attention to existing bathing beaches
being operated by this department at Jacob Rils Park and Rockavray, in
Queens, aad at Wolfe's Pond Park in Richmond, I call your attention also
to bathing beaches proposed at Canarsie Beach on Jamaica Bay, Dyker Beach
on Gravesend Bay, and at Marine Park, Great Kills, Richmond,

               The Jacob Riis beach has recently been expanded and improved,
and is now the finest natural bathing beach within the city limits. Both
this beach and Rockaway beach are extensively used, Wolfe's Pond beach,
although small, receives a highly concentrated use on week-ends.  The
proposed beach at Marine Park, Richmond, will accommodate over 100,000
bathers, when completed. All of these four beaches are now in waters which
are suitable for bathing, although they cannot properly be classed as
completely clean.

               the other two proposed beaches at Canarsio and Dyker Beach
are badly needed, as evidenced by the numbers of people who go swimming
at and noar these locations in spite of the highly polluted waters. We
realize that it may be some time before the waters adjacent to those two
beaches will be suitable for bathing, if present schedules for towage
disposal are carriod out.

               In the area under consideration in your present hearing, the
Park Department has three boat basins in various stagos of improvement.

               At Marine Park, Richmond, Great Kills harbor has been
partially dredged and is alroady being used by hundreds of private
pleasure craft. When this harbor has been completely dredged, as part
of the park and bathing beach improvement, it will be the largest small
boat harbor in this section of the Atlantic soaboard.

               Construction is only started at Marine Park, Brooklyn, and
Jacob Riis Park, Queens, on accommodation for small boats; but, with
the completion of the development of those two parks, there xclll be
added facilities for many more hundreds of private pleasure boats. 

               In addition to the bathing beach and boat facilities which
make direct use of waterfront facilities, the Department has under its
jurisdiction the recently completed extension of Shore Parkway around Fort
Hamilton, Bensonhurst Park, and the Dreier Offerman playground, fronting on
the east side of Gravesend Bay, and the large Neptune Avenue athletic and
play center, on the north side of Coney Island, also fronting on Gravesend
Bay.

             It is also planned to extend Shore Parkway along the east shore
of Gravesend Bay to a point just beyond Bensonhurst Park.  All of these
developments utilize the shore front for what might be called inactive
recreation. The character of the water along these shores has a direct
bearing on the amount of use the public will make of these developments. It
is, of course, desirable that the water be clean and inoffensive to the
patrons of these park areas.

             As was stated in the Park Department's recommendation at your
last hearing on New York City waters, the plans presented herewith for
bathing beach and boat basin improvements represent our plans as far as they
have progressed to date. With the inevitable increase in population in the
city, and particularly in the outlying districts along the north shore of
Jamaica Bay, and in Richmond, the demands for additional natural bathing
facilities will unquestionably be greatly increased, and we can safely
anticipate that the public will demand more bathing beaches in these two
sections.

              I recommend, therefore, that all New York City tidal waters,
south of the Narrovra, along the shores of Brooklyn, Queens, and Richmond,
be designated by your Commission as Class A.

                                             Very truly yours,

                                           /s/   ROBERT MOSES

                                                 COIvMISSIONSR

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 17, 1937


            On Friday, August 20th, at 1 P. M., and on Saturday, August 21st,
at 2 P. M., the Second Annual City-Wide Diving and Swimming Championship Meet
for children of the swimming pools of the Department of Parks will be held at
Astoria Pool, Astoria, Long Island.

            Twelve outdoor pools and one indoor pool will be represented at
this meet, which was won last year by Astoria Pool in close competition with
the other pools.

            The diving events will be held on Friday afternoon, with each
participant required to do a swan, jack, and two optional dives. These dives
will be made from the low board and the high board.

            The swimming events, scheduled for Saturday afternoon, consist
of: 25 and 50 meter free style; 25 and 50 meter breast stroke; and 25 and 50
meter back stroke, together with a 200 yard relay team.

            Boys and girls will enter in their respective events. Teams
competing for this championship have been selected from the various pools by
means of daily swimming meets, the winners of these meets aaking up the team
for the individual pool.

            There will be three classes of entries: Junior, Intermediate and
Senior, these groups being based on the age, height and weight of each
contestant. Entries for this meet closed Monday evening, August 16th.

            A plaque will be awarded to the pool scoring the most points, and
medals for first, second and third place of each event will be awarded.

            Astoria Pool will be open for regular patrons during this meet,
and spectators will be permitted in the pool area in civilian clothes during
the meet, without charge.

                                ############

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 17, 1937

               Today at approximately 11 o'clock Helen Hanchuck of 1632
Washington Avenue was the somewhat bewildered center of interest at Crotona
Fool, East 173rd Street and Fulton Avenue, The Brcnx.  At that time the
Department of Parks bestowed upon her the distinction of being the
two-millionth person to make use of the facilities available at the twelve
nunicipally operated swimming pools under the jurisdiction of that
Department.

                Since the opening of the swimming pools for the current
season on May 29th, 1937 - 1,486,776 children under the age of 14 have
attended the pools during free periods set aside for then exclusively from
10:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. each day, except Saturdays, and Sundays.  In
addition to this free period attendance, 513,324 children and adults havo
paid admission to enter the swimming pools throughout the City this season.

                Pretty young Helen Hamchuck was greeted at the entrance of
Crotona Pool by the Supervisor of the Pool, who, after advising her
of the fact that she was the two-millionth visitor, presented to her a
memento of the occasion, with the compliments of the Department of Parks,
amidst the cheers of about 5,000 happy children.

                                    End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 17, 1937


            The Department of Parks took bids this afternoon for the
construction of bulkheading along the south shore of Flushing Bay.  The
contract calls for about one-half mile of bulkheading along Northern
Boulevard between the boat basin, which has been constructed with State
funds, and the new asphalt plant at the mouth of the Flushing River now
being constructed by the Borough President of Queens. The bulkhead is to be
extended west of the boat basin for 1,000 feet to a point about 400 feet
south of the gasoline station on the Grand Central Parkway.  Between this
point and the Jackson's Creek Boat Basin, near North Beach, further rock
bulkheading will be placed by the Contractor on the Queens-Midtown Tunnel,
under an agreement with the City. Work on this phase of the Flushing Bay
improvement will start next month.

            Construction will consist of placing rock, or gravel fill,
dependent upon sub-surface conditions, and the rapidity with which
settlement of the material is accomplished.

            The three lowest bidders were:

           Arthur A. Johnson Corporation                   $ 342,640.
           29-28 Hunter Avenue
           Long Island City, N.Y.

           Welsh Bros, Contracting Co., Inc.                 578,400.
           35 Purvis Street
           Long Island City, N.Y.

           Tufano Contracting Corporation                    591,665.
           168-22 - 91st Avenue
           Jamaica, L. I.

and the Engineer's estimate is    $383,000.

            The bulkheading is designed to retain the shore line on both
sides of the boat basin being constructed by the State, along Northern
Boulevard and the new Bronx-Whitestone Bridge connection, and along the
Grand Central Parkway north of Northern Boulevard.

            It is necessary that the bulkhead be in place before the Federal
Government dredges the new channel and turning basin for which an appropriation
of $505,000 is now pending before Congress.

            The face of the bulkhead will be dressed with riprap and,
after settlement has stopped, a coping and railing will be constructed along
the top, with a promenade manning the entire length.

            The contract is to be complete before next spring. This
construction, along with the boat basin built by the State and the dredging
to be done by the Federal Government, will clean up the present unattractive
shore and the malodorous mud flats in the immediate vicinity of the only
water entrance to the World's Fair and Flushing Meadow Park.

                                  # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 16, 1937


                    The Department of Parks announces that on Monday, August
16th, The Bronx administrative office will be moved, to the new
administration and garage building at Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue in
Bronx Park.

                    The new building is completely fireproof in
construction, the facade being of brick, the floor of steel and concrete,
and the roof of slate.

                    When the building is completed, it will house beside the
administrative office, a modern garage for vehicles, with a repair
shop. There will also be plumbing, electrical, carpenter and paint shops
where the maintenance work of the borough will be done.

                    This office issues permits for golf, tennis, baseball
and other athletic activities, street tree planting and picnics, as well as
handling all other office work attached to the operation of parks in The
Bronx.

                    The telephone of the new office is Westchester 7-5200.

                                   #####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 12, 1937


                     NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                         AMATEUR GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP


      The final 36 holes of the 1937 Championship for the New York City Golf
Courses will be held on the La Tourette Golf Course in Richmond on Sunday,
August 15, 1937.

     Two hundred and thirty-six players from the various courses have filed
entries for this tournament. Prizes will be awarded to the low gross and
runner up scorer of the tournament and also to the low net and runner up
players in the A. B. C. and D. groups.  The low gross and low net scorers
among the women players will also receive prizes.

     The team prize will be awarded to the four low gross players from any
one course and medals given to the individual members of the team.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 12, 1937


                  The Park Department announces that the Barber Shop Quartet
Contest which was conducted so successfully in the fall season of the last
two years, will be held again during the latter part of this month.

                  Eliminations in the various boroughs will be held  
according to the following schedule:

Manhattan   - Washington Square Park   - Thursday; Aug; 26 - 8:30 P.M.
Bronx       - Poe Park                 - Thursday, Aug. 26 - 8:30 P.M.
Brooklyn    - Prospect Park,
               Music Grove             - Friday, Aug. 27 - 8:30 P.M.
Richmond    - McDonald Playground      - Wednesday,Aug. 25 - 8:30 P.M.
Queens      - Forest Park,
               Music Grove             - Monday,   Aug. 23 - 8:30 P.M.


                  Entries for this contest must be filed before August 20th,
at the borough offices located as follows:

          Manhattan    -   The Arsenal, Central Park
          Bronx        -   Zbrowski Mansion, Claremont Park
          Brooklyn     -   Litchficld Mansion, Prospect Park
          Queons       -   the Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens, N.Y.
          Richmond     -   Department of Parks, Clove Lakes Park, S.I.


                  A feature of this year's contest will be that the winning
quartet which will be selected on September 13th at the Randall's Island
Stadium, will be given a contract to sing in connection with the operetta to
be hold at the Municipal Stadium at Randall's Island from September 14th to
September 19th.

                   Quartets outside of the city limits but within the
metropolitan area may compete with permission of the Committee.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 16, 1937


                 The Park Department announces that on August 17th, and in
case of inclement weather, August 18th, a programof wading pool activities
will take place throughout its playground system.

                 Activities such as balloon races, gold fish hunt, wading
pool water polo, wading pool arch ball, water dashes and other wading pool
stunts will constitute the program.

                 Since January 1st, 1934, one hundred and nine wading pools
and eighty-one portable showers have been added to the City Park System, all
of which have been extremely popular with small children. The average daily
attendance has been approximately 133,000 children, ranging from three to
nine years of age. During hot weather in congested neighborhoods, it is not
unusual to find 500 to 700 children at one time in one of the larger wading
pools.

                 These wading pools are so constructed that they can be used
for recreational activities not only during the summer months but also
throughout the year. In the pool at Roosevelt Playground, the area is used
as a wading pool from 10 A.M. until 6 P.M. and at 8: 50 P.M., after the pool
has been drained, dancing takes place. During spring and fall seasons of the
year the pool areas are used for such activities as basketball, volleyball
and group games. In the winter months they are flooded for ice skating.

                 The first wading pool was built in 1924 in Hamilton Fish
Park and proved so popular that many more were constructed throughout the
city and in other sections of the United States. In all large playgrounds
which are constructed today by the Department of Parks, there is included a
wading pool of the type as outlined above. It has been reported that other
cities are now follovdng the plan of the Department of Parks by constructing
wading pools that can be used for various activities throughout the year.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 11, 1937


           Three years ago today the Park Department as the first step in a
new uniform policy for the wider use of all recreational facilities in the
five boroughs, established and opened with new equipment a group of
playgrounds to serve as model standards for the entire City Park System.

            In celebration of the third anniversary of these play areas,
birthday parties will be held in each in which the playground children will
participate.  The playgrounds will be gayly decorated, and a festive program
arranged, including songs, dances, impersonations, plays and group party
games. Where facilities permit, athletic contests and soft ball games will
constitute part of the program as well as the salute to the flag and the
playing of the national anthem.

            In many of the areas, mothers' clubs will furnish refreshments.

            The playgrounds in which parties will be held are as follows:-

                                      MANHATTAN

                DR. GERTRUDE B. KELLY MODEL PLAYGROUND, West 17th Street
                       between 8th and 9th Avenues.

                THOMPSON STREET PLAYGROUND, 95 Thompson St. between Spring
                       and Prince Streets.

                PLAYGROUND, Northwest corner Lewis and Rivington Streets.

                PLAYGROUND, 83 Roosevelt Street between Cherry and Oak Sts.

                CORLEARS HOOK PLAYGROUND, Corlears St. cor. S.S. Cherry St.

                GREAT LAWN PLAYGROUND, Central Park, Northwest cor. opposite
                       86th Street.

                INWOOD HILL PARK PLAYGROUND, Payson Ave. and Dyckman Street.

                ST. NICHOLAS PARK PLAYGROUND, St.Nicholas Ave. and W. 141 St.


                                     BROOKLYN

                PLAYGROUND, East 95th Street, Avenues K and L.

                JAMES J. BYRNE MEMORIAL PARK AND MODEL PLAYGROUND (Gowanus
                       Playground) 4th to 5th Aves., 3rd to 4th Sts.


                                       BRONX

                PLAYGROUND - E.141st St. between Brook and St.Ann's Aves.


                                      QUEENS

                ALLEY PARK PLAYGROUND - N. of Grand Central Parkway near
                       76th Avenue.

                CUNNINGHAM PARK PLAYGROUND - Grand Central Parkway, opp.
                       193rd Street.

                JACKSON HEIGHTS MODEL PLAYGROUND, 25th to 30th Aves. 84th
                       to 85th Streets


                                      RICHMOND

                 MODEL PLAYGROUND - Jewett and Castleton-Avenues

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 9, 1937


                         HILL BILLY MUSICAL CONTEST


            The Department of Parks will sponsor a contest, unfamiliar to the
residents of New York City, known as a "Hill Billy Musical Contest".

            The "Hill Billies" represent groups of people who inhabit the
mountainous districts of South Carolina and the adjoining states. They are
what the ancient latins would call "Sui Generis" - in a class by
themselves. Living in the seclusion and quietude of wooded mountains,
segregated from the din and confusion of worldly affairs, they have, in
clannish fashion, acquired a style of dress, manner of living and means of
enjoyment strikingly peculiar to themselves.

            In the sphere of music, song and dance, they are nonetheless
individual. The clear crisp air of high altitudes has developed in them
strong bell-like voices which find melodious expression in tunes of their
own composition to the accompaninent of home-made musical instruments and
dances created by the terpsichorean "Hill Billies".

            The Park Department is of the opinion that a contest embracing
the musical, dancing and singing characteristics of this singular class of
people would be extremely interesting, amusing and entertaining to residents
of metropolitan New York.

            The "Hill Billy Musical Contest" will be conducted for residents
of New York City, and the metropolitan area on Wednesday, September 8th, on
the Mall, Central Park at 8:30 P.M.  The contest will consist of two
divisions, one for amateurs and the other for professionals.

            Each of the five boroughs will conduct eliminations at the
following locations:

            Manhattan - Washington Square Park, Thursday, August 26th,
                        8: 30 P.M.
            Bronx     - Poe .Park, Thursday, August 26, 8: 30 P.M.
            Brooklyn  - Prespect Park, (Music Grove) Friday, August 27,
                         8:30 P.M..
            Richmond  - McDonald Playgd., Friday, August 27, 8: 30 P.M.
            Queens    - Forest Park, (Music Grove) Monday, August 16, 8:30 P.M.

            Troupes from Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester Counties and the
Metropolitan Districts may compete provided they receive the approval of
their Recreation Department and of the Department of Parks.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 9, 1937


                              RULES OF CONTEST

         1.      Combination nusical instruments, song and dance contest.

         2.      Troupe to consist of two or more persons.

         3.      Novelty instrunents and vocal interpolations permitted
                 and credit will be given for their use.

         4.      Each act to dance, play and sing a medley of Hill Billy
                 tunes of not more than eight minutes duration.

                 Semi-finalists will be allowed an encore.

         In selecting the winners of the contest the judges will take the
following factors into consideration:

         1.      Musical Technique (Rhythm, Harmony and Melody).

         2.      Interpretation and Presentation (Selection and use of
                 Instruments; selection of blending of songs).

         3.      Appearance of costumes.

         4.      Originality

         Suitable awards will be made to winners in each division.

         Entry blanks may be secured at the Borough Offices of the Park De-
partment or at the Arsenal, 64th Street and Fifth Avenue, New York City. No
fee required.

                                    END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 9, 1937


                     PARK COMMISSIONER ASKS THAT LOCKED
                      SCHOOL RECREATION FACILITIES BE
                           OPENED TO THE PUBLIC.


           Although the Department of Parks has trebled its recreational
facili- ties since January 1, 1934, to make up for the neglect of former
Administrations, the recreational needs of many neighborhoods are still
unsatisfied.  There are a number of neighborhoods throughout the City where
a tremendous tax has been placed on the park facilities owing to bad
planning on the part of the Board of Education.  In some cases there is a
complete lack of outdoor recreational facilities, and in others, there has
been an entire unwillingness on the part of the school authorities to share
their facilities at all hours and periods of the year with others.

           One of the most difficult negotiations I had to carry on was to
obtain the use for recreation of the Consolidated Edison land at the rear of
Haaren High School, 10th Avenue and 59th Street, Manhattan.  This was done
in a large measure because of the urgent request of the local school
authorities. It is quite obvious that intelligent planning would have
provided a playground adjacent to the school when it was built. It is
scandalous that so many of the school recreational school facilities should
be closed to the general public outside of school hours, and especially in
the summertime, when there is such a tremendous demand for them particularly
in congested and underprivileged neighborhoods.  I have been deluged with
letters and requests for additional summer play facilities since schools are
out and I find case after case where there are existing school play
facilities which are closed in the neighborhoods from which the complaints
arise.

           Up to the present time I have been unable to obtain anything like
reasonable cooperation in this matter, especially in the absence, until very
recently, of a Director of Extension Activities in the Board of Education. A
vacancy has existed in this position for over three years.

           All park playgrounds, swimming pools and other recreational
facilities in the City Park system are open from 10 A.M. to dark and in some
neighborhoods the playgrounds which are provided with floodlights are open
at night.  The Department of Parks' playgrounds and facilities are open
seven days each week, every day of the year. Not only has an effort been
made to provide wholesome play for children, but emphasis has also been
placed on adult recreation. So great has been the interest in some of the
activities and facilities that it has been impossible to accommodate and
satisfy all groups of individuals. There are approximately two hundred
applications for baseball permits every month which cannot be
granted. During the fall and winter months hundreds of requests are received
for indoor basketball courts which the Department of Parks cannot
accommodate, as there are only nine municipal gymnasiums under its
jurisdiction.

            It would aid the Department of Parks and satisfy the needs of
many neighborhoods greatly if the Board of Education with its numerous
elementary, junior high and high schools would open all of its facilities
and increase its leisure time program to accommodate more children and
adults. The janitors or rather custodians of the Board of Education
buildings will not open them unless they receive additional compensation for
doing minor casual extra cleaning, some of which is unnecessary. A survey of
school buildings shows that most supervised school play grounds are only
open from 1:30 to 5:30 P.M.; it shows that they are in many cases closed on
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. It also discloses that in some cases a
school recreational area is opened one or two blocks from a park
playground. Up to the present time there has been no cooperation or
coordination and a groat deal of overlapping.  In the face of a greet demand
for more playgrounds, the widest possible use has not been made of Board of
Education areas. There has been a great waste of public funds in the past
and also at present because of this lack of coordination and cooperation and
the demand of school custodians to be paid for cleaning of school premises
and keeping them open beyond regular hours.

            I have been informed that if a basketball team from a commercial
organization uses a school gymnasium from 5:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M., it must
pay approximately $3.00 and extra fees for use of toilets and dressing rooms
and that at 7:30 P.M. the school custodian receives another fee if a
different group uses the gymnasium. This is just one problem in connection
with the reorganization of the old Department of Extension Activities and
its new department of recreational and community activities that will have
to be solved.  Swimming teachers of the Board of Education receive annual
salaries and two months vacation. An additional appro priation of
approximately $44,000 is necessary to open the school showers and swimming
pools during the summer months. At P.S. #89, 134-135th Streets and Lenox
Avenue, Manhattan, which is an old type school building with inadequate
recreation facilities, there is a supervised small shower room approximately
10 ft. square, while one block away there is a beautiful indoor swimming
pool with swimming instructors, operated by the President of the Borough of
Manhattan. At 120th Street and Madison Avenue, Manhattan, there is a park
playground with the various units of equipment, also a wading pool and field
houses, while one block away, there is an indoor Board of Education
playground conducted in an old type school building, and operated from.
1:30 to 5:30 P.M.  Another example of overlapping is the Vacation Playground
at P.S. #158 at York Avenue and 78th Street, Manhattan, whereas the Park
Department John Jay Park and Playground is only one block away. Many other
examples could be cited but these are sufficient to point out the utter lack
of coordination and overlapping.

           Most anyone who gets around the City is aware of the Board of
Education facilities which lie around unused at least part if not all the
time in the face of the tremendous public demands for them. As to specific
examples, take Abraham Lincoln High School at Guider Avenue and Ocean
Parkway in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn. Here, there is a complete
athletic field closed to the general public during the summer with no other
recreational area nearby to take care of the neighborhood needs. Bushwick
High School at Madison and Irving Avenues offers a similar condition, and
Tilden High at Tilden Avenue and East 57th Street, and Manual Training High
at Seventh Avenue and 5th Street, also have areas which are unused. We have
found forty-two Public School yards which are never opened, most glaring of
which are P.S. #69, P.S. #101, P.S. #106, P.S. #107, P.S. #111, P.S. #117,
P.S.#125, P.S. #162, P.S. #198, P.S. #200, and P.S. #235.  These are either
in intensively developed sections or in sections which have no playgrounds
at all.

            In Manhattan, at Seward Park High School on the lower East Side
there are handball courts and a running track vaith grass growing on it
through lack of use because the gates are locked. Public School yards at
P.S. #152, #132 and #95, are also closed. George Washington High School play
area seems to be open on weekends only.

            In Queens, at the Newtown Athletic field, with a track, baseball
diamond and showers, the grass has grown knee high and the area remains
unused.

            In The Bronx, Samuel Gompers Industrial High School and Morris
High School Annex have large fields which are closed for the summer and
badly needed to satisfy the recreational needs of the neighborhoods

            Space does not permit a full list of all the closed facilities,
but those listed above are sufficient specific examples of City property
lying unused in congested sections where land values are enormously high and
the neighborhood recreation needs cannot be remedied overnight.

            Within the past week Pnrk' Dopartmont executives have taken up
this problem with the Board of Education through Mark McCloskey, the newly
appointed Director of Recreational and Community Activities. Our side of
this problem, which is the public side, has been fully explained to the new
Director and it is our intention to cooperate with him and the Board of
Education to the fullest extent possible. His problems in breaking down the
inertia, red tape and bureaucratic traditions of the Education Department
and the janitor-custodian racket are formidable. I am certain that if he
receives adequate authority from his supervisors and cooperation from his
colleagues, he will be able to solve many of these problems. The Park
Department has mado sonc very specific recommendations, which, if they are
carried out, will open some of the locked recreation facilities of the
Education Department before this summer is over.


                                       (signature of Robert Moses)
                                       Commissioner of Parks

                                    END.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 4, 1937


            Commissioner Robert Moses announced today that the Department of
Parks and the Marine Parkway Authority are cooperative in the presentation
of a spectacular Fire Works display at Jacob Riis Park on every Friday
evening throughout August.

            A huge parachute shell will release a large American flag which
will float through space, at 8:45 P.M., as a notice to the people that the
main display will start in fifteen minutes. At the same time several noise
signal shells will be fired as a salute to the National colors. At 9:00 P.M.
a Prismatic Fire Illumination shall open the display during which time
hundreds of special shells shall be fired.  Some of the special features are
Hanging Chains of Fire, Aerial Water Falls, Weeping Willows whose branches
drop to the ocean, Floating Festoons of Aerial Sleigh Bells, Huge Repeating
Shells similar to those constructed especially for the Great Lakes
Exposition, new experimental shells which are to be offered for the coming
New York World's Fair, Yellowstone Geysers, Maypole Girandolas that drop
ribbon-like streamers with rainbow combination colors, Special Prismatic and
Rainbow Batteries, Huge Colored Duration Stars, Triple Chrysanthemum Shells
covering 1000 square feet, Crescendo Display, Boy Scout Jubilee Shells,
Cherry Blossom. Shells, Aerial Flower Garden bombs, Ifystic Wheels and
Search Lights.  For the finale at one lighting a hundred shells shoot into
the sky and burst with various effects, including Flying Fish, Gold and
Silver Serpents, Devil Chasers and Myriads of Feathery Stars.

           Jacob Riis Park with a 70-acre parking field will provide
unlimited accommodation for any who may come by motor.

            The Boardwalk and beach areas will provide an excellent view of
the display as well as a restful place to cool off.

            The game areas and dancing at the Central Mall will provide
entertainment before and after the display.

            Refreshments nay be obtained at the Central Mall buildings.

            Jacob Riis Park may be reached by people living in easterly
Queens and the Rockaways by proceeding westerly along Rockaway Beach
Boulevard to its terminus at the park.

            People living in Brooklyn, Manhattan and the westerly portion of
Queens will of course reach the Jacob Riis Park much more easily and quickly
by proceeding to the southerly end of Flatbush Avenue and across the new
Marine Parkway Bridge, directly into Jacob Riis Park.

                                  # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 3, 1937


              Bids for the construction of the City Building which will
house the city's exhibit at the New York City World's Fair 1939 were
received at the Park Department offices - The Arsenal - this afternoon.
Bids received covered the superstructure,- plumbing, heating, and
ventilating and the electrical contracts.  The three low bidders on each of
the four contracts were as follows:

                               Contract for Superstructure

              Psaty & Furhman, Inc., 369 Lexington Avenue       $ 556,000,
              Cauldwell, Wingate Co., 101 Park Avenue             564,000.
              J . Weinstein & Rubin Bidg. Corp., 11 W. 42nd St.   582,200.

                               Contract for Plumbing

              J.. H. Bodenger, 53 Tenth Avenue                     29,654.
              J . L. Murphy, 340 1 . 44th Street                   30,953.
              James McCullough, 429 W. 44th Street                 30,970.


                               Contract for Electrical Work

              H. Z. Alt2berg, Inc. 1776 Broadway                   75,700.
              J. Livingston & Co., 420 Lexington Avenue            76,500.
              E. J. Electrical Install., 227 S. 45th Street        78,115.


                               Contract for Heating, 
                               Air Conditioning, ventilating, 
                               and Ice Rink

              Riggs Bistler Co., 516 Fifth Avenue                  259,000.
              J. L. Murphy, 340 E. 44th Street                     279,963.
              James Hi Martin, 1841 Broadway                       282,427.


              The New York City World's Fair Joiamission will consider the
award of these contracts at a meeting which will be held on August lOth.

                                    End

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                 For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                    August 3, 1937


           Bids were opened today in Albany by the State Department of Public
Works for the contract for the paving and drainage of the East Service Road in
Flushing Meadow Park, Queens, from the Long Island Railroad to the boat basin
on Flushing Bay. The Engineer's Estimate was $157,465.

           The three lowest bidders were:

                 A. W. Banko, Inc.                      $128,632.00
                    Hastings on Hudson, New York

                 J. P. Burns                             128,857.75

                 Garafano, Inc.                          132,091.50

           The East Service Road forms the northerly portion of the interior
park road system.

           The plans were prepared by the Department of Public Works in
Babylon and are based on the General Development Plan for Flushing Meadow
Park which was prepared by the Department of Parks. The East Service Road
parallels the Grand Central Parkway Extension, connecting the Intra-Mural
Drive, a portion of which has been completed by the World's Fair
Corporation, with the boat basin on Flushing Bay.  This drive, in the
ultimate park, will provide access to parking fields adjacent to the City
Building.  During the Fair, the entire Intra-Mural Drive will be the main
express bus route around the perimeter of the Fair.

            The road will consist of 44 feet of concrete pavement, divided
by a 22-foot grass panel, providing two lanes of traffic in each
direction. Starting just south of the Long Island Railroad, it runs north
under the recently completed Long Island Railroad bridge, skirting to the
left of the permanent Utility Building to be built for the park by the
World's Fair Corporation, passing under the new Roosevelt Avenue bridge, and
thence along the west side of the city parking field, which ultimately will
be the main athletic field, to the axis of the boat basin. Upon the
completion of the boat basin, the road will pass under the Northern
Boulevard bridge as part of a broad, formal mall which will connect the boat
basin with the field house and athletic field. From the boat basin, access
roads will connect with Northern Boulevard.

            The East Service Road will thus form the principal means of
access to the World's Fair, and ultimately to the park, for passengers
landing at the boat basin.

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