NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS PRESS RELEASES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1938

http://home2.nyc.gov/html/records/pdf/govpub/41921938_press_releases.pdf

Text extracted from PDF scan by pdftotext 3.03.

Corrected by Frank da Cruz, July 2014.
Further corrections: April 2016.

Note: This archive contains two press releases from January 1939 at the end.

Original order preserved.
Paragraphs reformatted by recombining hyphenated words and filling to 78 cols.
Duplicate entries omitted.
Tabs converted to spaces.
Coding: ISO 8859-1 (for cent signs and fractions).

Search Terms relevant to New Deal:

Federal Public Works Administration
Public Works Administration
Works Progress Administration
W. P. A.
W.P.A.
P.W.A.
relief program

Other interesting search terms:

Alice in Wonderland
Mother Goose
Olympic Tryouts
Jesse Owens
Amiable Child
World's Fair
Black Yankees

New Deal projects announced in this archive:

 4 Jan 1938  Brooklyn    New playground at the Old Broadway Ferry Terminal,
                           Broadway and Kent Ave. 
28 Jan 1938  Queens      WPA will convert PS 28 to playground, 115th St btw
                           14th Ave & 14th Road, College Point 
12 Feb 1938  Bronx       Completion of last two sections of Williamsbridge
                           Oval recreation center 
25 Feb 1938  Brooklyn    WPA starts work on park next to Brooklyn Library,
                           Flatbush Ave & Eastern Parkway 
10 Mar 1938  Manhattan   WPA workers will renovate 9 public bathhouses
16 Apr 1938  Brooklyn    New playground, Lafayette and Marcy Avenues
23 Apr 1938  Brooklyn    New playground, Lee Street btw Lynch & Middleton Sts
14 May 1938  Bronx       New playground, Stebbins Ave N. of E.167th St.
14 May 1938  Richmond    New playground, Midland & Lincoln Ave near 10th St.
31 May 1938  Manhattan   Plans for new pool at 23rd St & Ave A with WPA labor
 8 Jun 1938  Manhattan   Reconstruction of Cooper Park, 4th Ave & E.7th St
17 Jun 1938  Manhattan   Mother Goose sculptures, Rumsey Playground, Central
                           Park 
 2 Jul 1938  Queens      New playground at 14th St. south of 31st Ave
 2 Jul 1938  Brooklyn    New playground at New York and Clarkson Avenues
 2 Jul 1938  Brooklyn    New playground at 23rd St, 4th-5th Aves (or Manhattan?
 2 Jul 1938  Brooklyn    Expanded playground at Avenue P and East 4th Street
12 Jul 1938  Manhattan   New baseball diamond at Randall's Island
14 Oct 1938  Manhattan   Reconstructed Mt. Morris Park, 5th Ave & 120th St
 7 Nov 1938  Brooklyn    Bids for Circumfrential Parkway (PWA financing) 

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1/4/38   - 679 - Opening of 2 new playgrounds-Old Bway, Ferry Terminal at
                 foot of Broadway & Ken.. Ave., Bklyn and 34th ave., between
                 96th and Junction Blvd., Queens.  Total of 253 added to
                 Parks since Jan. 1934. 58 opened during 1937 - total
                 available today is 361. 

1/6/38   - 680 - Erection of bronze statue of Henry Hudson on top of Hudson
                 Memorial column. Redesigning and reconstruction of H.Hudson
                 Memorial Park. 

1/10/38  - 681 - Result of conference held by Mr. Moses, Dr. Wm. Tiffany and
                 Mr. Wm. Haugaard for preliminary planning, for evacuation
                 of Ward's Island. 

1/14/38  - 682 - Opening of lower level drive between Dyckman St, and
                 Geo.Washington Bridge on Henry Hudson Pkway, Jan. 15th.
                 
1/16/38  - 683 - Authorization by U.S.Navy of funds for improvement of the
                 Dover Patrol Memorial in Fort Hamilton Park, Bklyn.

1/15/38  - 684 - Opening in Alley Pond Park for playground. Total 254 added
                 since Jan. 1934, 58 during 1937.  Total 362.

1/18/39 - 684A - Memo accompanying NYC Parkway Authority Bill. 
 
1/19/38  - 685 - Ice skating carnival, Fri. Even. Jan 21st in Central Park.

1/20/38  - 686 - Comment by Robt. Moses to the press about State Building at
                 World's Fair.

1/26/38  - 687 - Plans and bids on construction of a pedestrian bridge over
                 the New York Central Railroad, tracks in Inwood Hill Park
                 by Henry Hudson Parkway Authority. 

1/28/38  - 688 - Grant of ·permission of Bd. of Ed. to use P.S. #28 for
                 playground, located on 115th st between 14th ave. & 14th Rd.
                 College Point.

1/28/38  - 689 - Completion of combination tide gate, dam and bridge at
                 Flushing Meadow Park.
                 
2/10/38 - 689A - Bill before Legislature requesting appropriation of
                 $2,700,000 for arterial construction in NYC.

2/12/38  - 690 - Opening of last two sections of Williamsburg Reservoir
                 Recreation Center.  Resume of acquisition and defelopment.

2/23/38 - 690A - The Grave of An Amiable Child

2/25/38  - 691 - Brooklyn Library and park in rear on site of Mt. Prospect
                 Park Reservoir to be completed and developed with the
                 assistance of Park Department.

3/2/38   - 692 - Park Department announces approaching completion of Boat
                 Basin at 79th & Riverside. Description of facilities and
                 rates.

3/4/38   - 693 - Randall's Island chosen for track meet and field events
                 by Intercollegiate A. A. A. A.  To be held June 3rd and 4th.

3/4/38   - 694 - Bicycling track to be opened at the Rice-Memorial Stadium
                 in Pelham Bay, The Bronx, as soon as weather conditions
                 permit. 

3/4/38   - 695 - Announcement as to rulings on conditions of surf fishing at
                 Rockaway Beaches.

3/9/38)  - 696 - Plans under way for renovation of nine bathhouses recently
3/10/38)         taken over by Park Department from the jurisdiction of the
                 Borough President of Manhattan.  

3/l2/38  - 697 - Ceremonies, Randall's Island March 12th, marking unveiling
                 of plaque in memory of children who died while inmates of
                 House of Refuge.

3/14/38  - 698 - Close coordination of the planning of recreational areas
                 with the plans for new Queensbridge Housing development.

3/20/38  - 699 - Announcement of floating bath in Hudson River at 96th St.

3/21/38  - 700 - 1938 Spring and Summer program of Recreational Activities.

3/22/38  - 701 - Flowering Trees and Shrubs along N.Y.C. Parkways.

3/24/38  - 702 - 8,000,000 car passed over Henry Hudson Bridge, Wed.Mch.23d.

3/26/38  - 703 - Listing of offices for Golf and Tennis applications-5 Boro.

3/30/38  - 704 - N.Y.C. Parkway Authority issuance of $18,000,000 in bonds
                 for rehabilitation of Rockaway Beach.

4/11/38  - 705 - Announcement of Japanese Cherry Trees at south end of Old
                 Reservoir site in Central Park.

4/12/38  - 706 - Comment on statement of P.N.Yountz-Bklyn Central Museum and
                 Children's Museum. 

4/13/38  - 707 - No funds for tree planting except on Parkways. Co-operation
                 with property owners about trees, etc. service rendered
                 free of charge.

4/14/38  - 708 - Opening of 10 golf courses Sat. a.m. Apr. 16th at 6
                 a.m. Information as to permits and offices where
                 obtainable. 

4/13/38  - 709 - Annual Easter Flower Show in Prospect Park
                 greenhouse. Doors open 10 a.m., April 15th and will be open
                 each day from 10. a.m., to 4 p.m., for about 2 weeks.

4/13/38  - 710 - Big Apple contest April 14th at 4 p.m. for children up to 16
                 years of age using playground at 74th St. and Henry Hudson
                 Parkway.

4/14/38 - 710A - Opening of ten golf courses

4/16/38  - 711 - Opening of new playground and comfort station at Lafayette
                 & Marcy aves., Bklyn. This makes a total of 255 playgrounds
                 added to the Park Dept's. recreational system since
                 Jan. 1934. Total number today is 363. 

4/20/38  - 712 - Children's pet shows will be held in designated playgrounds
                 of 5 Boro's on 2 successive Saturdays, april 23d and April
                 30th at 2 p.m., and on Friday April 22d, at 4 p.m.

4/20/38  - 713 - Thursday afternoon, April 21st at 2 p.m., children of the
                 playgrounds will begin planting the 2,000 individual garden
                 plots throughout the 5 Boro's.

4/22/38  - 714 - Erection of signs numbering all exits from parkways in the
                 city

4/21/38  - 715 - Use of play centers will terminate Saturday April 23d so
                 areas can be prepared for the coming swimming season.
                 Swimming pools will re-open to the public Saturday, May
                 28th at 10 a.m. 1,310,100 children and adults have made
                 use of facilities offered since the last years swimming
                 season. (Recreation activities are listedK

4/23/38  - 716 - Opening of new playground and comfort station at Lee
                 St. between Lynch and Middleton Sts. Bklyn. This is the
                 last of 24 sites acquired by Parks by condemnation in
                 1936. Total of 256 playgrounds since Jan. 1934. Total
                 number available today is 364.

4/27/38  - 717 - Finals of Roller-skating, Hockey tournament to be held at
                 Roosevelt playground, Sunday May 1st, at 2 p.m. Semifinals
                 take place Saturday, April 30th at 1.30 p.m., same
                 location.

4/28/38  - 718 - Concert on Sunday May 1st, on the Mall, Central Park at
                 3 p.m., given in conjunction with plans of the New York
                 Music Week Committee and Municipal Art Committee.

4/27/38  - 719 - Final game City-Wide Basketball Tournament, Saturday, April
                 30th at 2 p.m. at Roosevelt playground, between Manhattan &
                 Queens. (Scores)

4/28/38  - 720 - Model Sail and Motor Boat Regatta, Saturday April 30th,
                 1.30 p.m., at Conservatory Lake, Central
                 Park. (Qualifications and further races listed for all
                 Boro's).

5/4/38   - 721 - Hearing May 4th at 10.30 a.m., before Colonel D. McCoach,
                 District Eng., in charge of 1st Div. U.S. Engineers at 39
                 Whitehall st., on proposed footbridge to Ward's Island.

5/6/38   - 722 - Letter to city Editor attaching booklet and photographs on
                 completion of Henry Hudson Bridge and approaches, and Henry
                 Hudson Memorial Park. Program of exercises to be held
                 Saturday, May 7th in connection with opening.

5/6/38   - 723 - Finals of handball tournament May 7th, 2 p.m., at Houston
                 and 1st Street Playground, Manhattan.

5/13/38  - 724 - Annual Manhattan Boro Horseshoe Pitching Contest, at Circle
                 Lawn, W. 106th st near Central Park West, at 2 p.m.,
                 Saturday, May 14th. Inter-Boro Contest to be held at Circle
                 Lawn Saturday, May 21st at 1.30 p.m.

5/13/38  - 725 - Learn to Swim Campaign in Parks Swimming Pools, starting
                 Saturday June 11th until Saturday June 24th.

5/14/38  - 726 - Opening two new playgrounds and a comfort station. Richmond
                 - at Midland and Lincoln Ave near 10th St. Bronx - Stebbins
                 Ave., north of S. 167th St. This makes a total of 258
                 playgrounds added to Parks recreational system since
                 Jan. 1934. 366 available todate.

5/13/38  - 727 - A Pitch and Putt golf course will open at Jacob Riis Park
                 Saturday, May 14th. Bath houses at Riis Park, Orchard Beach
                 and Coney Island will open to public May 28th. At same time
                 all game areas will open. Fireworks and outdoor dancing at
                 Riis and Orchard Beach scheduled for 1st week in
                 July. Parking at Riis afcoinmodates 14,000 cars - Orchard
                 Beach 4,000; charge 25¢ beginning May 28th. Last year Riis
                 park visited by 1,725,000 - Orchard Beach 2,100,000. 

5/18/38  - 728 - The Eradication of Tent Caterpillars.

5/18/38  - 729 - 4th Annual Baby Parade of Fort Tryon Playground, Saturday,
                 May 21, at 11 a.m. Held under the auspices of the Mother's
                 Club of Ft.Tryon Playground and Inwood Chamber of
                 Commerce.

5/18/38  - 730 - Bronx Playgrounds presents The Mikado at Mullaly Park
                 Recreation Bldg., E. 165th St. and Jerome Ave., Friday and
                 Saturday, May 20, 21 at 8.15 p.m.

5/19/38  - 731 - Finals of Horseshoe Pitching Contest on Circle Lawn,
                 Central Park and 106th. St., Saturday, May 21, at 1 p.m.

5/24/38  - 732 - Finals of Harmonica Contest , on the Mall, Central Park,
                 Wednesday, May 25, at 8.30 p.m.

5/24/38  - 733 - Finals of Marble Shooting Contest at Hecksher Playground,
                 Central Park, Thursday, May 26th, at 4 p.m.

5/25/38  - 734 - Reopening of 12 outdoor swimming Pools, Saturday, May 28,
                 at 10 a.m. Manhattan:-Hamilton Fish, Thomas Jefferson,
                 Colonial, and Highbridge - Brooklyn: McCarren, Sunset, Red
                 Hook and Betsy Head - Bronx: Crotona - Queens: Astoria -
                 Richmond: Faber and Tompkinsville. 

5/31/38  - 735 - Board of Estimate at its meeting of May 5th, 1938 made
                 funds available for alteration of 4 Public bath houses
                 transferred from the Boro Pres. of Man. jurisdiction, to
                 the Park Dept. Locations: East 23d St and Ave A; 232
                 W. 60th St; 409 W. 28th St and 342 E. 54th St. Also
                 description of work to be done at each location.

6/1/38   - 736 - Announcement of completion of Animal Naming Contest held in
                 P.S. 6, 59 and 76. Ceremony for officially naming the
                 Animals in Central Park Zoo on Friday, June 3d at 2 p.m. 

6/2/38   - 737 - The discobolus formerly in Central Park northwest of the
                 Metropolitan Museum of Art has been removed to Randall's
                 Island. Description of Monument.

6/2/38   - 738 - Sunday,, June 5th at 2.30 p.m., finals of the one act play
                 Contest will be held on the Mall. Listing of Plays, Boro's
                 and judging.

6/3/38   - 739 - Dept. of Parks is cooperating with the Dept. of Markets in
                 checking violators of peddlers from doing business within
                 500 feet of any park, parkway, beach, boardwalk,
                 playground, swimming pool, recreation center, or other
                 property or facility under jurisdiction of Parks.

6/6/38   - 740 - Bids were received by N.Y.C. Parkway Authority for the
                 demolition of all houses and other structures in the path
                 of the new development along the Rockaway beach front and
                 leading to the Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge. Bidders
                 listed. Work will progress during summer without
                 interfering with the public use of beach or the stairsst
                 detouring of traffic over Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge. 

6/8/38   - 741 - U.S.Senate today passed the Rivers and Harbors bill
                 authorising further channel improvements in Flushing Bay in
                 accordance with Park Dept. plans.

6/8/38   - 742 - Dept. of Parks announces that "The Portable Farm Yard" on
                 wheels will visit playgrounds throughout the Park system
                 starting June 9th. Schedule, dates and locations attached.

6/8/38   - 743 - The Bronx Playgrounds Operetta Club will present "The
                 Mikado" on the Mall, Central Park, Friday, June 10th, at
                 8:30 p.m. Resume of past performances and cast listed.

6/8/38  - 743A - ... competitors ... redesign & reconstruction... Cooper Park

6/10/38  - 744 - An Archery demonstration  and tournament will take place at
                 Alley Pond Park, Queens, Saturday, June 11, at 2
                 p.m. Medals will be awarded.

6/10/38 - 745 - Dept. of Parks announces that the portion of the Motor
                 Parkway from Horace Harding Blvd. to the City line at
                 Nassau County, was officially placed under its Jurisdiction
                 by Board of Estimate on June 9th. Work will start
                 immediately. Resume of work to be done. 

6/10/37  - 746 - Dept. of Parks announces that the Geo. Cromwell Recreation
                 Center, transferred from the Boro Pres. of Richmond to
                 Dept. of Parks on May 1st, will continue to operate as a
                 recreation center. Resume of staff, facilities and program
                 listed.

6/10/38  - 747 - Learn to Swim Campaign will commence Saturday, June 11th at
                 all indoor and outdoor swimming pools. Listing of Pools,
                 addresses and time, also Organizations connected with this
                 campaign.

6/10/38  - 748 - Annual City-wide Athletic Meet for boys and girls of Park
                 Dept. playgrounds will take place at Randall's Island,
                 Saturday, June 11th at 1 p.m.  Events listed.

6/8/38   - 749 - Ceremonies in connection with the completion of the redesign
                 and reconstruction of Cooper Park, 4th ave and S. 7th St.,
                 Man, will be held June 9th, at 2.30 p.m.

6/13/38  - 750 - Announcement of Joyce Kilmer night of the Gaelic Musical
                 Society will be held on the Mall, Central Park, on Tuesday,
                 June 14, at 8.30 p.m. Program attached.

6/15/38  - 751 - "Federal Expenditures For Dredging of Flushing Bay
                 Increased to $699,000.00".

6/10/38  - 752 - Announcement of an Archery demonstration and tournament at
                 Alley Pond Park, Saturday,. June 11th, at 2 p.m.

6/16/38  - 753 - Announcement of the Junior Musical Instrument Contest, on
                 The Mall, Central Park, Sunday, June 19, at 2.30 p.m.

6/17/38  - 754 - Announcement of a number of special festivals in Manhattan
                 Playgrounds, to be held on Saturday, June 18th.

6/17/38  - 755 - Announcement of a statue depicting famed Mother Goose
                 characters has been erected at the entrance of the Mary
                 Harriman. Rumsey playground in Central Park.

6/18/38  - 756 - Announcement that plans for improvements to the Isaac
                 L. Rice Memorial in Pelham Bay Park, were approved by the
                 Board of Estimate, on June 16th. Bidders listed.

6/21/38  - 757 - Announcement of bids taken this a.m., for the construction
                 of a new bathhouse at Betsy Head Pool at Hopkinson ave,
                 between Livonia and Dumont aves., Bklyn. Bidders listed.

6/22/38  - 758 - Announcement that 360 playgroundr girls will participate in
                 the city-wide folk dance contest on the Mall, Central Park,
                 Saturday, June 25th, at 2.30 p.m. List of dances and
                 playgrounds represented.

6/23/38  - 759 - Detailed Announcement that on Sunday, June 26th at 2.30 p.m.
                 the Bronx Recreation Division of the Dept. of Parks will
                 present a dance festival called "The Pageant of Flowers" at
                 Williamsbridge Playground, Bainbridge Ave and 208th St.

6/23/38  - 760 - Regulations announced as to locations, etc., where fishing
                 from Park Shore Fronts in Manhattan will be permitted.

6/26/38  - 761 - Announcement of 140 acres in Central Park, set aside for
                 "passive use" during the summer months.

6/29/38  - 762 - Statement by Robert Moses at the Dinner of Chamber of
                 commerce of the Rockaways.

6/30/38  - 763 - Announcement of a varied program of activities in
                 commemoration of Independence Day in 369 playgrounds and
                 recreational area.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 30, 1938


                 FOURTH OF JULY PARK DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES


               The Department of Parks announces that a varied and
comprehensive program of activities in commemoration of Independence Day has
been prepared for the thousands of children who frequent the 369 playgrounds
and recreational areas under the jurisdiction of the Park Department.

               The activities will include track and field meets, flag
drills, the salute to The Flag, the singing of patriotic songs, plays,
recitations, the reading of the Declaration of Independence and organized
group games. Baseball and soft ball games are scheduled for the older boys.

               At 10 A.M. America's Good Will Union will conduct patriotic
exercises on the Mall, Central Park, and similar exercises will be conducted
there at 2:30 P.M. by the National War Veterans' Association.

               The Naumburg Concert will be given on the evening of July
4th. at 8:15 P.M., on the Fall, Central Park.

               Washington Square Park will be the scene of a patriotic
celebration by the "Friends of Garibaldi" at 2:30 P.M.

               From 7 to 10 P,M., at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, the
University Forum of America will commemorate the Fourth of July by
appropriate exercises.

               At the bandstand in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, the Knights of
Columbus, Long Island General Assembly, are planning a monster July 4th
demonstration at 9:30 A.M.

                                 **********
June 30, 1938.

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                                                                June 29, 1938

                         STATEMENT BY ROBERT MOSES
                                     AT
                            DINNER OF CHAMBER OF
                         COMMERCE OF THE ROCKAWAYS


           Until yesterday, I had every expectation of being present at your
dinner but there was such a flood of oratory and so much time was wasted at
the Constitutional Convention that I was not able to leave Albany until
after midnight last night to drive to New York and in the process I acquired
a cold which has laid me up for a day.  Nothing else would have kept me
away.  I am able to work at home but not to go out this evening.  The result
is that I have had to ask Mr. McNulty to be kind enough to read this
statement to you.

           While we are on the subject of the Constitutional Convention, I
wish to mention briefly the Grade Crossing Amendment which I have sponsored,
and which was unanimously reported by my Committee.  You may have noticed
that Governor Lehman attacked this amendment on various grounds.  It is
difficult for me to believe that the Governor wrote the statement himself or
that he can be so unacquainted with the facts of the situation.  This
amendment is of tremendous importance to the people of the Rockaways.  It
furnishes the only possible means of ridding you of the railroad now running
at grade which chokes up all the traffic on your peninsula.  It constitutes
a hazard to life and limb and prevents the completion of the Rockaway
Improvement program which in other respects is well under way.  Like
Atlantic Avenue and certain other stubborn grade crossing problems, we can
get nowhere as long as we attempt to make the railroads pay 50% of the cost
of crossing eliminations and exclude related public improvements.  For
thirty years committees have been agitating for the depression of the
Atlantic Avenue tracks.  For a very long period the Rockaway elimination has
been discussed, argued and kicked around.  You have been promised over and
over again that this problem will be solved.  One of the big arguments for
the passage of the 1925 grade crossing amendment was that you would be taken
care of.  The sane argument was made in 1927.  Instead, you have been given
the privilege, by your contributions to the State, of paying for upstate
eliminations without getting anything for your own harrassed community.  I
was one of the authors of the 1925 and 1927 amendments which were sponsored
by Governor Smith.  I have an acquaintance with the grade crossing problem
considerably longer than Governor Lehman's.  As a banker, Governor Lehman
knows quite well that the railroads cannot capitalize grade crossing
eliminations.  He knows that in the case of the Rockaway elimination, a
railroad is being asked to improve a section which the city is about to take
over for rapid transit purposes, and that as a practical matter you won't
get to first base excepting through an amendment such as the one I have
proposed which will insure the beginning of work next spring and the rapid
and early completion of this vital improvement.  Governor Lehman says that a
large part of the cost should be borne by the locality.  I ask why this is
so?  By segregating fifty million dollars for the completion of eliminations
in New York City every existing crossing at grade within city limits can be
cleaned up in two years.  The alternative proposed by the Governor is
another thirty years of discussion.  I want to be quite definite about this.
If you expect action on the Rockaway elimination, you had better tell your
local representatives in the Constitutional Convention what you want done
about it.  This will mean a whole lot more to you than endless hot air and
gas about search and seizure.  I assume that your conmunity and the millions
who visit it are more concerned to get the railroad tracks off the ground at
Rockaway than you are to have the time of the Convention eaten up with
Fourth of July orations about the Barons of Runnymede, the soldiers in the
snow at Valley Forge, the Battle of Saratoga and the rights of gangsters to
be free from undue interference from the police.

             I have stressed the importance of the Rockaway grade
elimination because it is right at the head of the calendar at Albany and
because without it the rest of the Rockaway Improvement Plan can never be
wholly successful.

            What's the trouble with Rockaway?  Sometimes an outsider with a
fresh point of view can analyze these things better than the local people
who are too close to the problem to see it in prospective, and who have
become discouraged after years of more or less futile efforts.  This barrier
beach is no different than scores of others in the metropolitan district and
elsewhere.  It is narrow, and in the summer season terribly congested.
Selfishness, bad planning and bad judgment have contributed toward a poor
development which made money for some people for a while, and ended in
trouble for everyone.  The boardwalk, following the pattern of other
American communities was built too close to the water so as to conserve
space for private exploitation back of it.  Expensive jetties became
necessary to prevent erosion.  All sorts of haphazard and undesirable
developments grew up back of the boardwalk.  Some of the frontage developed
into a seaside slum with shacks, tent colonies, and the most flimsy gadgets
and amusements.  Some of it was developed more sensibly, but the good was
corrupted by the bad.  The streets on the peninsula were laid out on the old
gridiron pattern.  There were inadequate east and west arteries.  There were
inadequate approaches from the mainland and to cap the climax the railroad
running at grade, choked up and piled up the traffic crossing from north to
south.  As usual, entirely too much space was zoned for business.
Tremendous fire hazards were created.  Scores of laws and city ordinances
were violated, involving the health and safety of the communities and of
visitors.  No particular conspiracy brought this about.  It happened
gradually like most cases of lowering of standards.  Too many people were
interested in cashing in and getting out, and too many did not look beyond
the day or at most the season.

          What was the answer?  There could be only one - official municipal
intervention to save the peninsula and prevent a collapse.  I am a
conservative in government matters, and I do not believe in extending the
functions of government beyond normal and proper limits.  When however, a
community of such vital interest as this one to the whole city, gets snarled
up and begins to deteriorate, the problem cannot be solved by private
individuals or groups, although their support is necessary to a proper
solution.

          The Park Department analyzed this problem, although it affected
many other agencies of the city government end even the state.  We sought a
practical means of attacking it.  Only limited funds were available and we
therefore had to tap private investment, setting up some sort of tolls to
pay at least part of the bill.  The plan, with which you are all familiar,
and on which we are working, is no complete solution of your problem, but it
will go a long way toward solving it.  We are widening the bottlenecks on
the Cross Bay Boulevard.  We are cleaning up a mile and a half of beach back
of the boardwalk, by tearing down all buildings.  We are furnishing you with
a parkway back of the beach and with play and other facilities there.  We
are financing a large part of the cost by combining the very successful
Henry Hudson Bridge, the Marine Parkway Bridge and the Cross Bay Bridge into
one Authority financed largely by a ten cent toll for pleasure vehicles.
The city is paying for part of the land, but none of the construction.
There are no local assessments.  We are attacking the grade crossing
problem.  We have built a fine new causeway from Marine Park, Brooklyn,
connecting with the completely reconstructed and amplified Jacob Riis Park.
We are about to attack the problem of preserving Jamaica Bay and the
frontage on it for recreation and residence.  We are presenting as
graphically as we can, the destruction which will result from garbage
dumping in the bay, from the pollution of its waters by sewage, and from
stubborn and stupid persistence in the old plan for a tremendous industrial
development in this area.  Don't make any mistake about it!  Your interests
lie not only on the Rockaway Peninsula but in the bay back of it, which
constitutes one of the greatest remaining natural resources of the
metropolis.

             Now, we have had our differences about plan and procedure.
There have no doubt been times when you have thought we were unreasonable
and arbitrary, but I know of no way of accomplishing great improvements of
this kind, in a reasonable time and while we still have the authority, other
than the way we have adopted.  The difficulties of accomplishing anything on
a large scale in New York City are enormous.  The best evidence of this lies
in the number of unsolved problems.  We have always had plenty of people to
think up plans and to put them on paper.  We have always had plenty of
diplomats who believe that it could be done with mirrors, sleight of hands,
and honeyed words.  We have had plenty of politicans to gull the people with
promises.  When however, it comes to action and getting things financed end
accomplished, none of these people are visible.  I know of no way of making
progress without inconveniencing a considerable number of people.  We try to
reduce this inconvenience to a minimum.  We don't look for trouble, but if
it appears we meet it.  At the start, we fix a date for the completion of
our work, and we let nothing interfere with meeting it.  We believe we are
on the right track in this case and that when we have completed the Rockaway
Improvement you will be satisfied that it has been done well.  I hope within
the future it will be carried considerably further.  In the meantime, we
report progress.

                                         ROBERT MOSES,

                                             Commissioner.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 26, 1938


                  Tne Department of Parks announces that in anticipation of
the closing of schools and hotter summer weather, as well as extreme heat
spells which will cause persons to seek relief in parks, forty lawn areas
with shade trees have been set aside in Central Park for passive recreation.

                  These lawn areas comprising 140 acres are located along
the East and West Drives opposite entrances on both Fifth Avenue and Central
Park West, as well as in the section immediately north of the
reservoir. They have been arranged in pairs of approximate equal area and
will be rotated weekly and more often if necessary, so that while one is
closed to recover from usage, the other will be available.

                  Areas open to the public will be properly posted with
signs reading:

                             This Lawn Open For Passive Use
                             Please Place litter In Baskets

and those closed will have signs reading:

                                   This Lawn Closed
                                       Keep Off

                   Passive use includes sitting or lying on the grass.  No
active games such as baseball, or running, jumping, wrestling, etc., will be
permitted on lawn areas.  Those who do not wish to sit on the bare grass,
must bring with them cushions, blankets, or other articles, as nevjspapers
may not be used for this purpose.

                   The police authorities are being furnished with a plan so
that they will be familiar with the location and operation of the areas.

                   The rotation and free use of these areas by the general
public will start immediately.

                                  # ### #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 23, 1938


               The Department of Parks announced this afternoon the
establishment of locations where fishing from park shore fronts in Manhattan
will be permitted.  There are three such locations:

               On the point which juts out into the Hudson River under the
George Washington Bridge; the northerly shore of Inwood Hill Park; and the
outer end of the recreation pier in the Harlem River at 107th Street.

              After consultation with the Department of Health, it was
determined that it is not safe to permit fishing along the shore of
Riverside Park from 72nd to 125th Streets. The waters along this shore
are heavily polluted with sewage and the Department of Health has traced
typhoid fever to the handling of articles coming out of such waters.
The following is quoted from the opinion received from the Department of
Health:

              "The waters of the Hudson River are considered by this
              Department as polluted and in the prohibited area for
              bathing purposes.

              It must be borne in mind that individuals fishing in
              these waters could easily have their hands contaminated
              by handling fish and fishing paraphernalia, and through
              this channel transmit infection from the polluted waters
              to themselves. As you know, typhoid fever may be a
              hand to mouth disease.  We have had at least one case
              in recent years in which all the epidemiological evidence
              pointed to fishing in polluted waters as the most
              likely source of infection."

              Although the waters adjacent to the three fishing areas
designated above are not safe for bathings the Health authorities do not
feel that they are so heavily polluted that fishing in them would be
particular ly dangerous.

              Signs have been erected in Riverside Park prohibiting fishing
along the newly constructed promenades, and the areas where fishing is
permitted in Ft. Washington and Inwood Hill Parks have been designated with
signs.

                                   #####
JUNE 23, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 23, 1938


                               DANCE FESTIVAL

            The Department of Parks announces that on Sunday, June 26 at
2;30 P.M., the Bronx Recreation Division, Department of Parks, will present
a dance festival called "The Pageant of Flowers" at Williamsbridge
Playground, Bainbridge Avenue and 208 Street.  Over four hundred children
representing various park playgrounds throughout the Bronx, will
participate.

            The festival includes nine group dances, namely, a Boys' Dance,
performed by the children from Teasdale, Melrose and Mullaly Playgrounds,
Farmer's Dance from Crotona Playgrounds, Storm and Sun Dance from Fort No, 4
and St.James Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs representing eight playgrounds
and flower dances of Daisies, Roses, Blue Bells, Daffodils and Garlands from
Mullaly, 166th Street, St. Mary's, Echo, Lyons Square, Cauldwell Avenue,
Williamsbridge, Ciccarone and Zimmerman Playgrounds respectively.

            A large dance festival is an annual event in the Bronx
Recreation Division, Department of Parks, and is the result of a cultural
program, including dancing, costuming and flower making, which is conducted
in the playgrounds.

            The pageant is composed mainly of character and aesthetic
dances, and this year the beautiful lawn at Williamsbridge will provide a
perfect background for this large number of children. They will be dressed
in colorful floral costumes, and it is planned to have the pageant more
spectacular and effective than in preceding years

June 23, 1938,

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 22, 1938


                      The Department of parks announces that 360 playground
girls will participate in the city wide folk dance contest on the Mall,
Central Park, Saturday, June 25th at 2:30 P.M.

                      Each borough conducted preliminary contests in which
the children of various playgrounds competed for the honor of representing
their borough in the city wide oxMbition of dancing scheduled for the Mall
this coming Saturday.

                      There will be three different age groups' 10 - 12
years; 12 - 14 years; 14 - 16 years; and each borough will enter its prize
winning folk dancers in each of the age group classifications. With 24 girls
to every folk dance, it is expected that about 360 children, appropriately
costumed, will exhibit the precision and coordination of the gay folk dances
which will include the favorites of many lands.

                      The Park Department Band will render selections during
intervals of the performance. 

                      Judges of the contest will be: Maude Whitehead, Savage
School of Physical Education; Madame serova, Hubbell - Serova Training
School of Dance; Grace J. Hoffman.

                      The list of dances and the playgrounds represented are
as folows:

                                        10 - 12   years

1. Polish Polka                 Chisholm playground                   Queens

2. Spanish Dance                New lots & Riverdale Aves. Plgd.      Brooklyn

3. The Krazy Kat Dance          Roosevelt Playground                  Manhattan

4. Irish Lilt                   Model Playground                      Richmond

5. "Snow White & the            Mullaly, Williamsbridge, St.Mary's
    Seven Dwarfs"               East, St.James, Zimmerman Plgds.      Bronx


                                        12 - 14 years

1. American Country Dance       Jackson Heights                       Queens
    "Pop Goes the Weasel"

2. Lubka - Hungarian Dance      Betsy Head & Clarkson Ave. Plgd,      Brooklyn

3. Nyitra - Hungarian Dance     J. Hood Wright Playground             Manhattan

4. Minuet                       Crescent Avenue Playground            Richmond

5. The Dance of the Daffodils   Williamsbridge playground             Bronx

                                        14 - 16 years

l. "Danish Dance for Four"       O'Connell playground                 Queens

2. Danish Dance                  Kelly Memorial Playground            Brooklyn

3. Hawaiian Dance                Harlem Housing Playground            Manhattan

4. Mexican Hat Dance             McDonald playground                  Richmond

5. The Garland Dance             Zimmerman & Ciccarone Plgds.

                                # # # # # #

JUNE 22, 1928

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 21, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that bids were taken this
morning for the construction of a new bathhouse at the Betsy Head Pool at
Hopkinson Avenue between Livonia and Dumont Avenues, Brooklyn.  This is the
site of one of the modern swimming pools operated by the Department of
Parks, In 1936, the old existing swimming pool was reconstructed and a
diving pool and a filter house constructed, but the bathers were forced to
use an old outmoded bathhouse.  Last year, this old bathhouse was destroyed
by fire, and the new one will replace this.

                The new bathhouse is an entirely new structure with all the
latest facilities for pool patrons and is designed to accommodate 6,000
bathers.  It consists of two wings, one containing dressing rooms, showerss
toilet facilities, etc., for men, and the other containing the same
facilities for women.  The wings are divided by an entrance lobby, which
will contain ticket booths and control stations.  The building is so
constructed that it will be used during the winter months for indoor
recreation and is large enough to permit the layout of a full size
basketball court in each wing.

                The structure is a combination of Colonial white brick piers
with glass brick panels and black serpentine marble trim and was designed by
John Matthews Hatton, Architect, who was a prize winner in the Pittsburgh
Glass Institute competition for the use of glass in the design of the
Astoria Pool.  The roof design is a new departure in that it is a built-up
bleacher section from which spectators can watch the pool activities.  A
decorative canopy, constructed on the cantilever principle, permits a clear
view from all seats.

                The low bidders on the general construction were:

                      1.   Lane Engineering Corporation            $234,682.00

                      2.   Skolnick Building Corporation            240,540.00

                      3.   Albert A. Lutz Company, Inc.             243,450.00

                The low bidders on the heating and ventilating work were:

                      1.   Jacobs Engineering Corporation            24,746.00

                      2.   Daniel J. Rice, Inc.                      25,877,00

                      3.   Soling Heating & Cooling Co., Inc.        25,945.00

                  The lew bidders on the plumbing work were:


                       1. Astroze Plumbing and Heating Corporation  $22,279.00

                       2. Fox Plumbing Company, Inc.                 22,754.00

                       3. Jesse E. Kahn                              23,624.00

                  The low bidders on the electrical work were:

                       1.   J. & N. Hoffman                          13,000.00

                       2a   Arc Electric Construction Co., Inc       14,162.00

                       30   Supremo Electric Equipment, Inc.         14,600.00


                            The total engineer's estimate           300,000.00

                  Awards will be made so that construction of the new
bathhouse will begin early in July.  Construction will be carried on without
hindrance to the use of the pool.

June 21, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS                                        June 18, 1938 
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                      For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         Saturday and Sunday

                   The Department of Parks announces that plans for a
contract for improvements to the dilapidated Isaac L. Rice Memorial in Pelham
Bay Park were approved on Thursday, June 16th by the Board of Estimate. The
following are the three low bidders for the improvements:

               B. J. Kearns, Inc
               2254 Sedgwick Ave, Bronx, N.Y.                 $43,420.70

               Madden & Lane, Inc
               42-16 Vernon Boulevard, L.I.C.                 $46,391.10

              Highbridge Concrete Corp.

               W. 169 St. & Harlem River, N.Y.C.              $49,066,00

                   The Engineer's estimate was $55,000.00.

                   The work provides for the demolition of the existing
swimming pool and the concrete bleachers and steps to the north of the pool;
the construction of walks, one regulation baseball diamond and one soft ball
diamond both with backstops, ten reinforced concrete paved tennis courts and
the grading and topsoiling of a large athletic field and other incidental
work.

                   The Rice development in the southerly section of Pelham
Bay Park was inherited by the present Park Department in 1934 and was
constructed by the Rice family as a gift to the City of New York in memory of
their father. It was inadequately designed and constructed with no regard for
maintenance problems. The swimming pool was never fit for public use and
would not hold water.  The stadium was never satisfactory and the cost of
reconstructing it would be almost as much as the cost of a new structure of
equivalent capacity.

                   Plans are now before the Board of Estimate for the
alteration and renovation of the natatorium building.  The plans call for the
installation of a new heating plant, new ventilators, additional steel
lockers, repairs to electrical and plumbing equipment and painting.  The
Engineer's estimate for this work is $10,000.

                   These improvements will provide much needed adequate
recreation facilities in an outmoded area.

June 18, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 17, 1938


                   The Department of Parks announces that an interesting
statue depicting famed characters of the Mother Goose series of fairy tales,
has been erected in the circle at the entrance to the Mary Harriman Rumsey
children's playground in Central Park, Manhattan, formerly the site of the
old Casino.

                   The statue consists of a large figure of the witch who is
astride the goose's back; then on the east and west sides in bas-relief there
are figures of Humpty Dumpty, Old King Cole, Little Jack Homer, Mother
Hubbard, and Mary and Her Little Lamb.

                   This amusing piece of statuary was carved out of a
thirteen ton piece of Westerly Granite by W. P. A. craftsmen, working under
the jurisdiction of the Park Department. It was conceived and designed by
Frederick G. Roth, who also designed and executed the carved group of "Alice
in Wonderland" characters in the Sophie Irene Loeb Memorial erected in the
Heckscher Playground in 1936.

JUNE 17, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 17, 1938


                The Department of parks announces that on Saturday, June
18, a number of special festivals will be held in several playgrounds in
Manhattan.  One of the special events taking place is a play entitled,
"Princess Tenderheart" which will be held at the Lillian D. Wald playground,
Cherry, Monroe & Gouverneur Streets at 2 P.M.  Other plays entitled, "What
Time Is It?", "Marjorie's Garden", and "The Chinese Nightingale" will be
given at Mount Morris Playground, 120 Street and Madison Avenue; Fort Tryon
Playground, Broadway and Dyckman Street and McCray Playground, 138 Street
between Fifth and Lenox Avenues, at 3 P.M.

                 A children's pet show has been arranged for the
playground located a t Lewis & Rivington Street, and a Chinese festival at
2:30 P.M. at Columbus Park.

                                   ## # ##

JUNE 17, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 16, 1938


                    The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Junior Musical Instrument Contest will be held on The Mall, Central Park,
Sunday, June 19 at 2:30 P. M.

                    Any child living in New York City who was an amateur
musician and had not reached his seventeenth birthday was eligible to compete
in the preliminary playground and district eliminations held prior to the
borough finals.  The contestants were divided according to the following age
groups: Sixth to ninth year; tenth to thirteenth year; fourteenth to
sixteenth year.  From these groups, the seven most talented musicians were
selected to represent the boroughs at the finals. Each contestant will be
permitted one solo to be completed within five minutes. In the eliminations,
500 children competed.

                    The judges of the contest will be Miss Frederique
Petrides, Conductor of the Orchestrette Classique, Mr. Herman Katims, concert
pianist, Mr. Arthur Cremin, Director of the New York School of Music, and
Miss Annette Walker, Director of the Children's Art Theatre.

June 16, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces thet an archery
demonstration and tournament will take place at Alley Pond Park, Queens, on
Saturday, June 11, at 2 P.M.

                In connection with this tournament there will be a
demonstration by Miss Myrtle Miller, International Archery Champion and Carl
Weese, New Jersey State Champion, Other leading archers who vail perform and
take part in the archery demonstration and tournament are Miss Dorothy
Duggan, Metropolitan archery champion and Mr.  William Jackson and Harold
Hill, champions of New Jersey.

                 The New York Archers have been cooperating with the
Department of Parks in staging this archery demonstration and tournament.

                Medals will be awarded by the Park Department to the winners
of this tournament. 

                                  # # # # #

JUNE 10, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 15, 1938

                     "FEDERAL EXPENDITURES TOR DREDGING
                  OF FLUSHING BAY INCREASED TO $699,000.00"


                THE SECOND DEFICIENCY BILL PASSED TODAY BY THE UNITED STATES
SENATE CARRIES AN ITEM FOR FURTHER CHANNEL IMPROVEMENTS IN FLUSHING BAY IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE PLAN SUBMITTED BY THE NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS.
THIS INCREASES TO $699,000, THE FEDERAL EXPENDITURES FOR DREDGING THE BAY.

                UNDER THE NEW APPROPRIATION THE ARMY ENGINEERS WILL DREDGE A
NEW CONNECTING CHANNEL 150 FEET WIDE AND 6 FEET DEEP ALONG THE GRAND CENTRAL
PARKWAY SEA WALL BETWEEN THE MUNICIPAL BOAT BASINS AT JACKSON'S CREEK AND
FLUSHING MEADOW.  THE PROPOSED IMPROVEMENT WILL COST $194,000. AND IS IN
ADDITION TO THE $505,000. FEDERAL PROJECT NOW UNDER WAY WHICH PROVIDSS FOR
DEEPENING THE EXISTING MAIN CHANNEL ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF FLUSHING BAY TO 12
FEET BEIOW MEAN LOW WATER AND DREDGING A TURNING BASIN IN FRONT OF FLUSHING
MEADOW BOAT BASIN.  THIS PART OF THE PROJECT IS SCHEDULED TO BE COMPLETED
THIS SUMMER.

                THE NEW CONNECTING CHANNEL WILL BE CONSTRUCTED THIS FALL AND
WILL COMPLETE THE REHABILITATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF FLUSHING BAY AS AN
OUTSTANDING BOAT HARBOR.  IT WILL FILL THE GAP IN THE PROPOSED CIRCUMFRENTIAL
ROUTE AROUND THE BAY AND AID GREATLY IN THE CIRCULATION OF TRAFFIC IN AND OUT
OF THE BAY.  UNDER THE PLAN, SHALLOW DRAFT BOATS WILL BE DIVERTED TO THE
CONNECTING CHANNEL, RESERVING THE MAIN 12-FOOT CHANNEL FOR COMMERCIAL BOATS,
EXCURSION CRAFT AND OTHER LARGE DRAFT VESSELS DURING PERIODS OF CONGESTION.

                                 ***********

JUNE 15, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 13, 1938


               The Department of Parks announces that Joyce Kilmer night of
the Gaelic Musical Society of America will be held on The Mall, Central Park,
on Tuesday, June 14 at 8:50 P. M.

               The New York State Symphonic Band of the W. P. A. Federal
Music Project conducted by Giuseppe Creatore will play at that time.
The speakers on the program will be Honorable William Griffin, Reverend
John B. Kelly and Commander Paul A. Williams.

               Attached is a copy of the musical program.

Dated: June 13, 1938.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Joyce Kilmer Night
                                    of the
                       GAELIC MUSICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

                                Central Park Mall

                   Flag Day, Tuesday evening, June 14th
                              8:30 o'clock

                   Dr. James J. Walsh          Chairman
                   Edward J. Walsh             Executive Director
                   Judge William O'Dwyer       Festival Director

                       NEW YORK STATE SYMPHONIC BAND
                        Giuseppe Creatore, Conductor

                                     PROGRAM

March        "Stars and Stripes"                  John Philip Sousa

Introductory Remarks                              Hon. William Griffin

Invocation (In Song) "The Prayer Perfect"         Nicholas Farley

PANAMERICANA                                      Victor Herbert

The Poet of the Trees                             Rev. John Bernard Kelly,
                                             Catholic Writers Guild of America

Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest                      Commander Paul A. Williams
                                                  Bozeman Bulger Post,V.F.W.

Vocal   "Sleep Soldier Boy" (Dedicated to Joyce Kilmer)
               Norman J. Carey, Veterans of Foreign Wars of U. S.

Gaelic Fantasie      "Reminiscences of Scotland"      Godfrey
                      Vocal-A Hundred Pipers
                      March Mcdley-CLAN EIREANN PIPERS BAND
                                   Pipe-Major James McHugh

                          I N T E R M I S S I O N

Irish Caprice      "Fond Memories of Innisfail"   Giuseppe Creatore*

Vocal Solo         "Trees"    (Joyce Kilmer)      Nicholas Farley

Tribute to Joyce Kilmer

Festival March                                    Victor Herbert

                    Vocal - The Minstrel Boy

Keltic Lament                                     Foulds

Vocal Solo       "The Trumpeter" Norman J. Carey, V.P.W.

American Fantasi                                  Victor Herbert

                           "Star Spangled Banner"

                                    TAPS

        Bugler John McGrory, Big Six Post, Veterans of Foreign Wers

        Program presented by the Gaelic Musical Society of America in co-
operation with the W.P.A. Federal Music Project end broadcast over Station
WFYC.

                                ************

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 8, 1938


                    The Department of Parks announces that ceremonies in
connection with the completion of the redesign and reconstruction of Cooper
Park, Fourth Avenue and East 7th Street, Manhattan, will be held on Thursday,
June 9th, at 2:30 P.M.

                   Historical significance is given to the area as Abraham
Lincoln made his first political speech here in 1860 after being nominated
for President of the United States.

                    Old type business buildings comprise the immediate
neighborhood and buildings of the Cooper Union Institute lie directly north
and east.  In the reconstruction, the old dilapidated, unsanitary,
underground comfort station has been eliminated; new exterior concrete walks
constructed; 17 new trees planted and the fence enclosing the area repaired
and painted.

                    At the north end on the base of the triangular plot is a
memorial monument, consisting of a bearded figure of Peter Cooper, American
inventor, manufacturer and philanthropist, seated in a massive bronze chair
standing on a white marble pedestal. The statue stands beneath a heavy marble
canopy supported by Ionic granite columns and was erected by the citizens of
New York in grateful remembrance of Peter Cooper, founder of the Cooper Union
for the advancement of science and art.

                   Mr. Gano Dunn, President of Cooper Union, J. Charles
Riedel, Deputy Chief Engineer of the Board of Estimate and a graduate of
Cooper Union, and Stanley H. Howe, Executive Secretary to the Mayor, will
participate in the exercises. Commissioner Robert Moses will preside as
Chairman.

                                     ###

JUNE 8, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938


               PARK DEPARTMENT PLAYGROUND TRACK AND FIELD MEET


                 The Department of Parks announces that the Annual City-Wide
Athletic Meet for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds will take
place at Randall's Island Stadium, Saturday, June 11th, at 1:00 P.M.

                 During the month of May, each playground held preliminary
contests and practice sessions in preparation for the borough-wide meet which
was conducted in each of the five boroughs.  The five who qualified in the
finals of the 18 track and field events of the various borough meets are
eligible to compete at the City-Wide Meet on Saturday.

                 It is expected that about 500 boys and girls of various
classifications, ranging from the 85 lb. class to the unlimited class, will
participate in the meet at Randall's Island.

                 All the competitors have demonstrated their superior
athletic ability by qualifying in the various borough meets.  In addition,
they have been thoroughly trained in the fine points of dashing, long
distance running, baton passing, broad jumping and high jumping.

                 With this background of experience and preparation, the
expected large crowd of spectators, anxious to have their native borough boys
and girls carry off the palm of victory, can look forward to a day full of
surprises and keen competition.

                 Gold, silver and bronze raedals vail be awarded to those who
finish first, second and third in each event.

                 The list of events far the City-Wide Playground Meet on
Saturday, June 11th, at Randall's Island Stadium, is as follows:

                                   EVENTS

BOYS

  85 lb. Class      100 lb. Class           120 lb. Class       Unlimited Class
  50 Yd 0 Dash      60 Yd. Dash             70 Yd. Dash         100 Yd. Dash
  Potato Race       Standing Broad Jump     Running High Jump   Half Mile
                    820 Yd. Relay           440 Yd. Relay       880 Yd. Relay

GIRLS

 85 lb. Class                   110 lb. Class           Unlimited Class
 40 Yd. Dash                    50 Yd. Dash             60 Yd. Dash
 ESS & Spoon Race               Basketball Throw
 Potato Race                      for distance

                     UNLIMITED - OVER 18 YEARS OF AGE

                 Senior Boys & Girls Mixed Relay - 400 Yard
                         2 Girls to run 55 yards each,
                         1 Boy to rurt 110 yards.
                         1 Boy to run 220 yards.


         As an added attraction, three groups of sixty children from
playgrounds in the Boroughs of Bronx, Manhattan and Queens will give dancing
performances during intervals of the meet.

         The Park Department Band will provide music both for the meet and
the dancing.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938


             The Department of Parks announces that the "Learn to Swim"
campaign will commence on Saturday, June 11th at both the outdoor and indoor
swinning pools under its jurisdiction and also at the pools of various
organizations which have expressed intentions of conducting a similar
campaign. This crusade to assist all who are desirous of learning how to swim
will continue until Saturday, June 25th.

             The list of Park Department swinning pools which will be
available for the people of New York City during the "Learn to Swim" Campaign
is as follows:

                   SWIMMING POOS OF THE DEPARMENT OF PARKS

                           OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOLS


MANHATTAN

Hamilton Fish Pool            East Houston & Sheriff 'Streets
Colonial Pool                 Bradhurst Ave., W. 145th to 147th Streets
Highbridge Pool               Amsterdam Ave. & W. 173r.. Street. 
Thomas Jefferson Pool         111th to 114th Streets & First Ave.

BROOKLYN 

Sunset Pool                   7th Ave. & 43rd Street
McCarren Pool                 Nassau Ave. & loriiner Street
Red Hook Pool                 Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets
Betsy Head                    Hopkinson,Dumont & Livonia Avonuos

BRONX

Crotona Pool                  173rd St. & Fulton Avenue

QUEENS  

Astoria Pool                  Barclay Street & 24th Drive

RICHMOND

Faber Pool                    Faber St. bet* Richmond Terrace & Kill Van Kull
Tompkinsville Pool            Arrietta Street at Pier #6

                      INDOOR SWIMMING POOLS
                                      
MANHATTAN

407 West 28th Street           Clarkson & 7th Avenues
5 Rutgers Place                328 Rivington Street
              342 East 54th Street

BROOKLYN

Metropolitan and Bedford Avenues

             Hours of instruction at Park Department Pools during the
campaign areas follows:
                                               OUTDOOR POOLS

                Children                     10:30 - 11*30 A.M. daily
                Children                      2:00 - 3:00 P.M. daily
                Adults                        5:00 - 6:00 P.M. daily

                                                INDOOR POOLS

                Children                      2:00 - 4:00 P.M. daily
                Adults                        7:30 - 8:30 P.M. daily


          The Board of Education will have the swimming pool at Seward Park
High School located at Essex, Grand and Ludlow Streets, available for free
instructions in swimming from 7:30 P.M. to 10:30 P.M. during the entire
campaign.  In the other school swimming pools, the Board of Education will
give instruction to pupils of the respective schools.

          The organizations cooperating with the Department of Parks in the
"Learn to Swim" Campaign are as follows:

Greenwich House, Y.M.C.A. (West Side Branch,) Harlem Branch, 23rd Street
Branch, Gamp Fire Girls, Educational Alliance, Woman's Swimming Association,
Kips Bay Boys Club & Yorkville District , School Health Conmitteo, Y.W.H.A,
Y.M.H.A., Manhattan Council of Girl Scouts, Christodora House, Chelsea
Association for Planning & Action, Boy Scouts of iaccrica, Juvenile Aid
Bureau, Police Department, P.S.A.L. - Board of Education, American Red Cross,
Police Athletic League, Children's Aid Society, Board of Education - Bureau
of Recreation and Community Activities, College of the City of Now York, New
York University, and Catholic Youth Organizations.

June 10th, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938

                  The Department of Parks announces that the George Cromwell
Recreation Center located on Pier 6, Tompkinsville, Staten Island, officially
transferred from the office of the Borough President of Richmond to the Park
Department on May 1st, will continue to operate as a recreation facility for
the general public for which it was originally planned and constructed.

                  The periods of operation will he determined according to
usage and demand. Past experience has proven that it is not economically
worth while for the City to retain an operating staff in an indoor recreation
establishment of this kind during the summer season. Active recreational use
of the pier will be resumed immediately after Labor Day under the supervision
of competent recreation directors. The pier will be available for use under
permit by organizations for dances and other group activities as it has been
during the past two years. Applications for permits for activities of this
kind should be made to the borough office, Field House, Clove Lakes Park,
Victory Boulevard and Clove Road, West Brighton, Staten Island.

                  The main hall in the center of the first floor of the pier
will be arranged for active recreation in the form of basketball, badminton,
volleyball, paddle tennis, shuffleboard, quoits, group games, handball,
indoor tennis, gymnastics and track events, with a small section set aside
for quiet games such as checkers, chess, camelot, psychic baseball, carrom
games, jack stones, lotto and domino. The concession will continue operation
in its present location on the first floor and the Administrative Office of
the Supervisor will also be on this floor.

                  The second floor will be set aside for the accommodation of
the various veterans organizations, some of which are at present on the first
floor. The second floor also will contain a single large room available on
application to the borough headquarters, for general use of any organization
desiring to use it.

                  On Thursday nights, social dancing held during fall, winter
and spring months at Pier 6, will be held during the summer on the Marine
roof of the Tompkinsville Swimming Pool. In case of inclement weather, the
dancing will be held on the lower floor of George Cromwell Recreation Center.

                                 # # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938


         The Department of Parks announces that the portion of the Motor
Parkway from Horace Harding Boulevard to the City line at Nassau County, was
officially placed under its jurisdiction by action of the Board of Estimate
on June 9th.

         Work will start immediately on installing guard rails, directional
signs and a turn-around in Alley Pond Park, to convert this out-moded
vehicular road into a two and onehalf mile bicycle path operating from 8
A. M. until dark.  The new facility will open on July 2nd.

         Racks for parking bicycles will be provided at the Alley Pond
fieldhouse and also at the Alley Pond picnic area.  A shop will be installed
at the fieldhouse so that those not owning bicycles and desirous of using the
facilitys may rent them, and those arriving in cars may park them in the
existing parking space.

         The path will be operated by uniformed park attendants and patroled
by mounted police.

June 10, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 10, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that an archery demonstration
and tournament will take place at Alley Pond Park, Queens, on Saturday, June
11, at 2 P.M.

              In connection with this tournament there will be a
demonstration by Miss Myrtle Miller, International Archery Champion and Carl
Woese, New Jersey State Champion, Other leading archers who will perform and
take part in the archery demonstration and tournament are Miss Dorothy
Duggan, Metropolitan archery champion and Mr.  William Jackson and Harold
Hill, champions of New Jersey.

               The New York Archers have been cooperating
with the Department of Parks in staging this archery demonstration and
tournament. 

              Medals will be awarded by the Park Department to the winners of
this tournament. 

                                  # # # # #

JUNE 10, 1938

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF COOPER PARK ANNOUNCEMENT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 8, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that The Bronx Playgrounds
Operetta Club, composed of a group of ambitious playground youngsters, will
present Gilbert & Sullivan's popular and tuneful operetta "The Mikado", at
The Mall, Central Park, Friday, June 10th, 8:30 P.M.  A capacity audience is
expected to attend this performance to hear these talented youngsters.

              Two performances were given at the Mullaly Recreation Building,
May 20th and 21st.  More than six hundred persons were turned away the first
night.  The youngsters made such an excellent showing it was decided to give
a performance at The Mall, June 10th, at the Music Grove, Forest Park,
Queens, June 25th and there is a possibility of a performance at Randall's
Island.

              Several months ago a group of youngsters from the park
playgrounds started to rehearse for a thirty minute condensed version of the
first act of "The Mikado" to be given over Station WNYC, March 19th. The
youngsters were so enthused over the broadcast that it was decided to
organize the group as an operetta club and give the entire show on two
evenings during May.  This proved to be a very successful affair.  The group
will start rehearsal in the fall to produce two new shows, one during the
winter and the other early in May. The average age of the cast is about 15 to
16 years.  Considering that the entire cast of forty-five have only been
together a few months, great progress has been made.  This is part of the
cultural (arts and crafts, music, dramatics and dancing) program encouraged
and sponsored by the Department of Parks.  The entire production is directed,
staged and costumed by The Bronx Recreation Division.  Those taking the
principal characters are:

              Nanki Pooh                   Andrew Durie
              Pish Tush                    Lawrence Rosenthal
              Pooh Bah                     Morris Gershonzwit
              Koko                         Charles Framed
              Yum Yum                      Lena Rogoff
              Pitti Sing                   Beverly Auerbach
              Peep Bo                      Alice Steigerwald
              Katisha                      Sarah Post
              The Mikado                   Stanley Simons
              Umbrella Carrier             Raymond. Fremed


                           Ensemble

Nobles and Guards:- Richard Anderson; Irving Ehronreich; Myron Gritzhandler;
       George Jower; Marvin Mendelowitz; Mortimer Natkins; Seymour Potolsky;
       Seymour Schlassingcr; Stanley Sherman,

Coolies:- Abe Austrach; Theodore Bartsch; Milton Fagin; Alvin Gomerman;
       Joseph Crmhi ; Charles Pinkham; Louis Polock.

School Girls:- Nita Berkowitz; Valeria Carpi; Evelyn Charles; Stell Camhi;
       Gertrude Crosby; Pearl Gluck; Sandra Gritzhandler; Sylvia Hauser;
       Irene Havas; Frieda Havas; Helen Ifelfakis; Pearl Mondelowitz;
       Sara Spiro ; Florence Tumarkin; Harriet Wox and Madeline Zetena.

                                   # ### #

JUNE 8, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 8, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that "The Portable Farm Yard"
on wheels towed by a Park Department truck will again visit many playgrounds
throughout the Park system starting June 9th.

              This model farm exhibit will remain in each play area for a
period of three days during the course of the summer.

              No longer do City dwellers and especially the underprivileged
children of the congested districts have to travel to the country to see and
enjoy real domestic animals which are common to the children of rural
districts.

              This miniature farm yard will contain a barn for housing
animals and an adjacent area enclosed with a white wooden farm fence where
the animals can move around.

              Through the courtesy of Bordens Milk Company, a cow and a calf
will again be a featured attraction.  In addition, there will be pigs, ducks,
chickens, chicks, turkeys and pigeons.

              The first showing of "The Portable Farm Yard" will be at the
Roosevelt Playground, Chrystie & Forsythe Streets, on Thursday, June
9th. Aftor two days it will move to Corlears Hook Park, South Street, foot of
Jackson Street.

              The playground children will be informed by their directors of
the time the farm yard will visit the respective playgrounds.

              Attached is a schedule of June and July dates and locations of
stops.

                                    #####

JUNE 8, 1938

(ATTACH.)

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                         PORTABLE FARMYARD SCHEDULE

MANHATTAN:

     June 9    Roosevelt Playground    - Canal to Houston St. & Chrystie St.

     June 11   Corlear's Hook Playgd   - Jackson & Cherry Streets

     June 14   Battery Park            - Ft. of Broadway & Battery Place-

BRONX:

     June 17   Claremont Park          - East 170th St. & Clay Avenue

     June 20   St. Mary's Park         - 149til St. & St. Ann's Avenue

     June 23   Crotona Park            - Crotona Park East & 173rd Street
     
BROOKLYN:

     June 27   Red Hook Park             Richard & Pioneer Streets

     June 30   Dyker Beach Park          86th Street & 14th Avenue

     July  6   Kelly Memorial Plgd.      Avenue S & East 14th Street

     July  9   Lincoln Terrace           Rochester & Buffalo Avenue

     July 12   Bushwick Playground       Putnam & Knickerbocker Avenues

     July 15   Cooper Park               Maspoth Avenue & Sharon Street

QUEENS:

     July 18    Anawanda Park           - Fairview Avenue & Stanhope Avenue

     July  21   Liberty and 173d St. Playground

     July  25   Liberty & 102nd St. Playground

     July  28   Highland Park           - Jamaica Ave. & Elton Street

     July 30    Greenhouse              - Forest Park

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 8, 1938


                                FLUSHING BAY

                   The United states Senate today passed the Rivers and
Harbors authorizing further channel improvements in Flushing Bay in
accordance with the plan recently submitted' by the New York City Department
of Parks.

                   The bill provides for the dredging of a new connecting
channel 150 feet wide and 6 feet deep along the Grand Central Parkway sea
wall between the municipal boat basins at Jackson's Creek and Flushing
Meadow.  The proposed improvement is in addition to the federal project now
under way which provides for deepening the existing channel to 12 feet below
mean low water and dredging a turning basin in front of the Flushing Meadow
boat basin. This work is scheduled to be completed this summer.

                   The new connecting channel will help materially in the
rehabilitation and development of Flushing Bay as an outstanding boat harbor.
It will fill the gap in the proposed circumferential route around the bay and
aid greatly in the circulation of traffic in and out of the bay. Under the
plan, shallow draft boats will be diverted to the connecting channel,
reserving the main 12-foot channel for commercial boats, excursion craft and
other large draft vessels during periods of congestion.

June 8, 1938.

                                 # # # # # #

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF BRONX PLAYGROUND OPERETTA CLUB PERFORMANCE OF THE MIKADO]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 6, 1938


                 The New York City Parkway Authority received bids today for
the demolition of all houses and other structures in the path of the new
development along the Rockaway beach front and leading to the Gross Bay
Boulevard Bridge. The low bidders were as follows:

           Section A   Arthur A. Parker & Harry Barr,
                       City                               $14,980.00

           Section B   Cleveland Wrecking Company,
                       Cincinnati, Ohio                    12,465.00

           Section C   Same Company                         6,250.00

           Section D   George Forman Demolition Corp.,
                       City                                 9,990,00

                 The New York City Parkway Authority and the Department of
Parks wish to announce that while construction will be steadily progressed
throughout the summer, it will not interfere with access to the beach or with
the use by the public of the boardwalk and beach areas. Furthermore, the
reconstruction of the present Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge will be carried on
in such a way that it will not be closed to traffic at any time.

                                # # # # # # #

JUNE 6, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 3, 1938


                                The Department of parks announces that it is
cooperating with the Department of Markets in checking up on violators of the
regulation of the latter Department prohibiting licensed itinerant peddlers
from doing business within 500 feet of any park or parkway, beach, boardwalk,
playground, swimming pool, recreation center, or other property or facility
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks.

                                This regulation had been agreed upon by large
licensed operators and the Department of Markets, and is stamped on the back
of each license.

                                Of eight violators reported to the
Commissioner of Markets earlier in May, all have had their licenses revoked.
Over the Memorial Day weekend, approximately 172 itinerant peddlers - all
violators of the stipulated regulation and many of which had no licenses in
their possession, were reported by park Department employees. The disposition
of the cases of these violators is still pending.

                                The Department of Parks is determined to aid
Commissioner Morgan of the Department of Markets, in ridding the city of
irresponsible licensed itinerant peddlers who frequently violate the
regulation affecting park property.  These peddlers make unfair competition
and take business away from legitimate Park Department licensed
concessionaires who provide a revenue to the city.

                                They are also mainly responsible for much of
the unsightly litter at entrances to city parks and in the case of parkways
heavily traveled on weekends, peddlers vending their ware slow up traffic,
cause congestion and sometimes serious rear end collisions.

                                    #####

JUNE 3, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 2, 1938


                    On Sunday, June 5th at 2;30 P0M., the Department of parks
will conduct the finals of the One Act Play Contest on the Mall, Central Park.

                    As a result of the tournament held in each borough the
following plays have been selected to represent the boroughs in the finals:

                        Brooklyn     -   Lindsay Playground
                                         "The Wicked Witch"

                        Manhattan -      Lewis and Rivington St. Playground
                                         "The Stolen Prince"

                        Bronx        -   Gauldwell Avenue Playground
                                         "The Brownie Bush" by Marjorie
                                         Barrows from the book "The Pirate
                                         of Pooh and other Plays for Children
                                         published by Rand McNally & Co.

                        Queens       -   Upper Highland Park Playground
                                         "The Clock Shop"

                        Richmond     -   Model Playground
                                         "The silver slipper"

                    The casts consisting of boys and girls 10 - 16 years of
ago have been coached by the playground directors.

                    Mrs. Lionel Sutro, Commissioner Paul Moss, Mr. Frank
Francis of the little Theatre Players and Miss Dorothy Gordon will act as
judges of the contest. In judging the plays the following items will be taken
into consideration:

                                   Acting       -   60%

                                   Delivery     -   20%

                                   Type of Play -   10%

                                   Costumes     -   10%

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 2, 1938


                    The Department of IParks announces that the discobolus,
formerly located in Central lark northwest of the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
at Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street, Manhattans has been removed to Randall's
Island.

                    Relocated as it is now facing the entrance to the
Municipal stadium, the scene of the last Olympic tryouts and other athletic
contests as well as the coming I. C. 4 A games June 3 and 4, it has a more
fitting and appropriate setting.

                    Tiiis bronze monumental and heroic figure of a
discus-thrower is 7 ft. 4 in. high set on a 4 ft, 5 in.  polished granite
base. It was acquired by the city in 1926 as a gift from Mr. and Mrs. Ery
Kehaya and was sculpted by Costos Dimitriadis.

                                 # # # # # #

June 2, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              June 1, 1938


           The Park Department announces that the Animal Naming Contest
conducted in Public Schools No. 6, 59 and 76 during the past three weeks has
been completed.

           Seventeen unnamed animals in the Central Park Zoo were closely
observed by hundreds of children as they, accompanied by their teachers, made
tours of inspection in preparation for the contest.

           Judging by the multiplicity and variety of suggested names that
were submitted to the Department of Parks, the contest evoked great
enthusiasm and interest among the students.

           Some of the names indicated concentrated study of the animals'
habits, actions, attitudes, color and form; others, consisted of first names
usually given to human beings.

           The final tabulation of suggested names submitted by the children
of the three schools entered in the contest, resulted in the selection of the
following names for the particular animals listed:

ANIMAL                         WINNING NAME               SCHOOL REPRESENTED

2 Ocelots          (Male)         Oscar                         P. S. 59
                                                                P. S.  6
1 Zebra            (Female)       Dotty
                   (Male)         Stripey                       P. S. 76

2 Giant Anteaters- (Females)      Anty                          P. S.  6
                                  Snoopy                        P. S. 59

1 Baboon           (Male)         Sleepy                        P. S. 76

2 Arabian Goats -  (Male)         Arabo                         P. S. 59
                   (Female)       Arabette                      P. S. 59

3 Red Deer         (Male)         Rusty                         P. S. 76
                   (Female)       Queeny                        P. S. 76
                   (Female)       Rose                          P. S.  6

4 Sea Lions        (Male)         Flappy                        P. S.  6
                   (Female)       Barker                        P. S. 59
                   (Female)       Water-Lily                    P. S.  6
                   (Female)       Splashy                       P. S. 76

2 Baby Buffaloes - (Male)         Bill                          P. S.  6
                   (Female)       Nickelo                       P. S. 76

            The ceremony, at which the animals will officially receive the
names chosen for them, will take place at Central Park Zoo, Friday, June 3 at
2 P. M.

           Each of the schools which participated in the contest, will be
represented by the children who selected the winning names.

June 1, 1938.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 31, 1938


           Earlier this spring the Department of Parks announced that plans
were being prepared for the renovation of nine public bath houses transferred
to them from the jurisdiction of the Borough President of Manhattan. Some of
these structures - relics of earlier days - date back to times when tenements
were cold-water flats, many with no bathtubs.

          At its meeting of May 5th, 1938, the Board of Estimate made funds
available for the purchase of materials and rental of construction equipment
for the alterations on four of these - namely, East 23rd Street and Avenue A;
232 West 60th Street; 409 West 28th Street; and 342 East 54th Street.  The
improvements will be done with relief labor under the supervision of the
Works Progress Administration and inspected by the Department of Parks.

          Renovation of the first two will start immediately; while work on
West 28th Street is tentatively scheduled to start on June 6th, and 54th
Street on June 13th.  At 23rd Street and Avenue A where there is adequate
vacant city-owned land available, a new outdoor swimming pool, 125 ft. long x
50 ft. wide and 4 ft. 6 inches deep, will be provided, as well as a separate
diving pool approximately 30 ft. x 60 ft. and 9 ft. deep.  These pools will
supplement the present indoor one which will remain in use and provide an
essential facility for summer bathing in the midtown East Side congested
district.

          At 60th Street the bath will be altered so that a much-needed
gymnasium will be provided on the top floor and will be connected to the
present inadequate recreation building at 59th Street, which will be
renovated so that locker and shower accommodations for the users of both pool
and gymnasium can be installed.

           The building at 28th Street, opposite Chelsea Park, which already
includes a gymnasium, will be changed so that the second floor, now used for
public baths, will be made into a recreation room provided with a removable
stage.

            The alterations to the 54th Street building which now has two
separate pools - one for women and one for men - will have one
large pool sufficiently deep to permit diving at one end.

            In each of these four structures the plumbing, electrical, heating
and ventilating systems will be thoroughly overhauled and cleansing baths
for itinerants or those still residing in cold-water flats, will be provided
separately from the pools and showers serving the pools.

            Those improvements, when completed, will not only provide the
advantages of modern bathing and swimming, but also recreational facilities
that have lone been denied and for which there has been an increasing demand.

                                       (END)

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 25, 1938


                 The Department of Parks announces the reopening of the 12
outdoor swimming pools on Saturday morning, May 28th at 10 A. M.  They are
located as follows:

Manhattan:        Hamilton Fish      E. Houston & Sheriff Streets
                  Thomas Jefferson   111th to 114th St. & First Avenue
                  Colonial           Bradhurst Aver W. 145th to 147th St.
                  Highbridge         Amsterdam Ave. & 173rd Street

Brooklyn:         McCarren           Nassau Ave. & Lorimer Street
                  Sunset             7th Ave. & 43rd Street
                  Red Hook           Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets
                  Betsy Head         Hopkinson, Dumont & Livonia Avenues

Bronx:            Crotona            173rd Street and Fulton Avenue

Queens:           Astoria            Barclay Street and 24th Avenue

Richmond:         Faber              Faber St. bet. Richmond Terrace &
                                     Kill Van Kull
                  Tompkinsville      Arrietta Street at Pier No. 6


                 During the Fall, Winter and Spring these pools have been
operating as free play centers. Various facilities such as handball,
volleyball, paddle tennis, etc., were provided and used by approximately one
and one-half million children and adults. For the past month they have been
closed to the public in order to do the necessary cleaning and repairing and
painting to put them in readiness for summer operations.

                From May 28th to June 25th the pools will open at 10 A.M.
and close at 6 P.M.  From June 26th until the termination of the season they
will open at 10 A.M. and close at 10 P.M. when the heat is oppressive the
pools will remain open later than 10 P.M., and if the evening hours are cold,
or there is rain, they will be closed at 6 P.M.

                 On weekdays from 10 A.M. until 12:30 noon there will be a
free period for children under 14 years of age, during which hours, no adults
can be admitted to the pool areas. After 1 P.M. on weekdays and all day on
Saturdays, Sundays end holidays there is a 10¢ charge for children under
14 years of age and a 20¢ charge for older children and adults.

                Group swimming and diving instructions, intra-pool and inter-
pool contests, water shows, water polo tournaments, life saving and first aid
classes will be part of the aquatic program.  A "Learn-To-Swim" campaign has
been scheduled for the period beginning June 11th to June 25th.  As a
highlight of this campaign, a novice swimming meet, open to Municipal
employees, will be held at Crotona Pool, Wednesday afternoon, June 22nd at 5
o'clock.  The swimming season will be climaxed with the annual-five-borough
swimming and diving championship, the date to be announced in the future.

                   Orchard Beach at Pelham Bay Park in The Bronx: Jacob Riis
Park and Rockaway Beach in the Rockaway peninsula, Queens; Coney Island; and
South Beach in Staten Island will also open on Saturday, May 83th, There are
bath house accommodations at Jacob Riis, Orchard Beach and Coney Island. At
Jacob Riis Park there will be accommodations for approximately 14,000 cars
and the bath house has been enlarged to acconmodate 10,000 patrons.  At
Orchard Beach the new parking field is nearing completion and there will be
parking facilities for approximately 5000 cars.  The interior of the bath
house at Coney Island has been entirely redecorated, and this bath house will
accommodate 10,000 patrons.

                  At Jacob Riis and Orchard Beach there will be a 25¢
parking fee for automobiles, a charge of 15¢ for child lockers, 25¢ for
adult lockers, and 50¢ for a dressing room per person, Beach shops are
also provided whore bathing accessories may be purchased and beach umbrellas
and chairs may be rented at a nominal charge. At Coney Island there is a
charge of 15¢ for a child locker and 25¢ for an adult locker.

                  Recreation areas will be available to the public at Jacob
Riis, Orchard Beach and Coney Island which will provide shuffleboard, paddle
tennis and handball. The charge for the use of these facilities will be
100 per person per half hour.  Besides these game areas at Jacob Riis Park,
there is also an 18 hole pitch and putt golf course, A charge of 50¢ is
made for each round of golf played, which includes golf clubs and balls.

                                * * * * * * *


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[DUPLICATE COPY OF REOPENING OF SWIMMING POOLS ANNOUNCEMENT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 24, 1938


           The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the Marble
Shooting Contest will be held at Heckscher Playground, Central Park,
Thursday, May 26th, at 4 P. M.

           Boys and girls, 12 years of age and under, who have survived the
keen competition always present in the borough eliminations, will be eligible
to play at the City-Wide finals on Thursday afternoon.

           Prizes will consist of gold, silver and bronze medals which will
be awarded to the first, second and third place winners respectively.

                                   * * * *

May 24, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 24, 1938


                    The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Harmonica Contest for boys and girls will take place on the Mall, Central
park, Wednesday, May 25 at 8:30 P.M.

                    Eligible contestants have been placed in three different
age groups; Group "A" - 15 years and under; Group "B" - 16 through 18 years
of age; Group "C" - unlimited - over 18 years of age.

                    Two winners from each group in the borough eliminations
will be eligible to compete at the City finals on Wednesday night.

                    Immediately following the contest for individual
harmonica players, there will be a contest for "Harmonica Bands". Each band
shall consist of not less than four (4) nor more than twelve (12) mem- bers.
The winning band in each of the borough elimination contests will be
permitted to participate in the city-wide finals.

                    Competitors of both contests will be limited to the
rendition of two selections of their own choice not longer than 4 minutes
each.

                    The winners will be rated on a basis of 50% for execution
and interpretation; 50% for selection, tone rhythm, and harmony.

                    Mr. Rudolph Wurlitzer, Miss Lee Edwards, Editor of the
"Accordian World" and Mr. Harold Leighton of the Harmonica Institute of
America have consented to act as judges.

                    Gold medals will be awarded to the winners of the final
contest, silver medals to the borough placing second and bronze medals to the
remaining borough finalists.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 19, 1938


                         HORSESHOE PITCHING CONTEST


                The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the
Horseshoe Pitching Contest will be held at the Circle Lawn, Central Park and
106 Street, Saturday May 21, at 1:00 P. M.

                Boys and young men over sixteen years of age of the Park
Department playgrounds will vie for the city championship in both singles and
doubles matches.

                Playground and district eliminations were conducted in the
various boroughs during the past four weeks at 279 horseshoe pitching courts
under the jurisdiction of the Park Department.

                The finals on Saturday will be restricted to the winner and
runner-up of each borough tournament.

                Prizes will consist of gold and silver medals for the winner
and runner-up respectively; bronze medals will be awarded to the other
contestants.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 18, 1938


          The Department of Parks announces that the Bronx Playgrounds Operetta
Club, a group of ambitious youngsters, sponsored by the Department of Parks,
will present Gilbert and Sullivan's popular operetta, "The Mikado", at Mullaly
Park Recreation Building, East 165 Street and Jerome Avenue, The Bronx, on
Friday and Saturday, May 20 and 21, at 8:15 P. M.

          Less than three months ago this group of children started to
rehearse for a thirty-minute condensed version of the first act of "The
Mikado" to be given over Station WNYC on March 19, The youngsters were so
enthused over the broadcast that it was decided to organize the group as an
operetta club and to give the entire performance on two evenings during May.

          Considering that the entire cast of forty-five are sixteen years of
age and under, it has made great strides in the short time they have been
together.  The entire production is being trained, staged and costumed by the
Bronx Recreation Division of the Department of Parks. Those taking the
principal characters are:

                  Nanki Pooh        *Andrew Durie
                  Pish Tush          Lawrence Rosenthal
                  Pooh Bah           Morris Gershenzwit
                  Koko               Charles Fremed
                  Yum Yum           *Margaret Donaghy
                  Pitti Sing        *Adelin e Zetena
                  Peep Bo            Alice Steigerwald
                  Katisha            Sarah Post
                  The Mikado         Stanley Simons
                  Umbrella Carrier   Robert Fremed

               *0n May 21, these parts will be played by Seymour Weinstein,
                Lena Rbgoff and Beverly Auerbach, respectively.

                                      ENSEMBLE

                Nobles and Guards: - Richard Anderson, Irving Ehrenreich,
                Myron Gritzhandler, George Jower, Melvin Mendelowitz,
                Mortimer Natkins, Seymour Schlessinger, Stanley Sherman,
                Seymour Schulman, Frank Vascellaro.
                Coolies: - Abe Austrach, Theodore Bartsch, Miltin Fagin,
                Alvin Gomerman, Joseph Cambi, Charles Pinkham, Louis Polack,
                School Girls: - Nita Berkowitz, Valeria Carpi, Gertrude
                Crosby, Evelyn Charles, Stella Cambi> Pearl Gluck, Lillian
                Gluck, Sylvia Hauser, Irene Havas, Frieda Havas, Helen
                Kalfakis, Perl Mendelowitz, Sara Spiro, Florence Tumarkin,
                Harriet Wox.

          Since the original broadcast the group repeated over Station WBNX
and on May 8 appeared on the Mutual Broadcasting network, over Station WOR as
part of the Rainbow House program,

                                    -END-
May 18, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 18, 1938


               The Department of Parks announces that the Fourth Annual Baby
Parade of the Fort Tryon Playground at Dyckman Street and Broadway,
Manhattan, will be held on Saturday, May 21.

               At 11 A. M. the entries will parade from P. S. No. 52, Academy
Street and Vermilyea Avenue to 207th Street; then, to Sherman Avenue; and
then, to the playground.  The procession will reach the playground at 
11:30 A.M.

               Music for the occasion will be provided by the American Legion
and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, representing Inwood.

               Over 100 entries have been received including the following
divisions:

               1st - Babies in carriages accompanied by mothers;

               2nd - Floats;

               3rd - Costumes;

               4th - Twins.

               The Inwood Chamber of Commerce has provided, through the
interest of local social and civic agencies, ten silver loving cups.

               This program is being conducted by the Playground Directors
cooperating with the Mothers' Club of Fort Tryon Playground, and the Inwood
Chamber of Commerce.

                                     END

May 18, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 18, 1938


                      ERADICATION OF TENT CATERPILLARS

        EASTERN TENT CATERPILLAR (Malocosoma americana) -

        This is one of our easily recognized common insect pests which feeds
upon several of our fruit and shade trees. Wild cherry and apple trees are
their favorite foods. The caterpillars occur in colonies and spin tent-like
nests in the forks of limbs close to where they feed.  The insects pass the
winter in egg masses upon the smaller twigs of the favorite food
plants. These eggs hatch early in the spring, about the time the first leaves
appear the young caterpillars feed, spin their tents, and grow to full size
in five or six weeks. The egg mass is from one-half to three-fourths of an
inch long and forms a grayish brown, knotlike band around the twig, closely
resembling the bark in color. Each mass contains from one hundred and fifty
to two hundred and fifty eggs, placed on end, packed closely together, and
covered with a layer of light brown, frothy glue, which gives a tough,
smooth, glistening surface to the whole mass. The eggs are deposited by the
female moths by early mid-summer; when fresh, the egg mass is white, but in a
few days the color darkens.

         They pupate in protected places above ground, the moths emerge in
midsummer and lay their eggs.  There is only one brood per year.

         During late summer the little caterpillars are formed within the
eggs, but do not hatch until the next spring.

         The family instinct is very strong with the young caterpillars and
all from one egg mass cooperate in spinning the tent which furnishes them
shelter at night and during cold or wet weather.

          They commence feeding soon after sunrise, but often retire to the
nest during the heat of the day, and always seek its shelter during cold days
or when the sky becomes clouded and rain threatens. When full grown they
become extremely restless, wander away from the nest, and are frequently
encountered on walks and roadsides, and feed on almost any plant found. At
this stage they are about two inches in length, deep black in color, thinly
covered with yellowish hairs, with a white stripe down the middle of the
back. At the middle of the side of each segment is an oval, pale blue spot
with a broader, velvety black spot adjoining it in front, giving somewhat the
effect of an eyespot.

          Having found a suitable place under loose bark, in a fence, in the
grass or rubbish beneath a tree, or in the shelter of some neighboring
building, the caterpillar settles down and proceeds to encase itself in a
thin cocoon of tough white silk.

          Like all moths, the adults are night flyers and are frequently
attracted to lights.

          Tent caterpillars can be best controlled by spraying with lead
arsenate mixed with water at the rate of four to six pounds to one hundred
gallons of water, thoroughly spraying all of the foliage, both on the upper
and under sides of the leaves.

          Eradication by contact spraying is also a vary good method of
control. Of course, if the caterpillars are not thoroughly wetted, the spray
is not effective. Contact sprays do not prevent reinfestation.  This spray is
composed of sodium oleate and an alcoholic extract of pyrethoum flowers
diluted with water. Nicotine and soap solution mixed with water, is also an
excellent contact spray. Both these contact sprays should be used according
to instructions found on the containers in which the insecticides are
contained.  These insecticides can be purchased at any reliable seed store.

           It is recommended that residents of neighborhoods where attacks
occur club together and enter into a contract with a reliable tree expert
company to eradicate the tent caterpillar and any other insect pest
present. This arrangement is less expensive and more efficient than if
individual sprayings were requested.

                                    (END)

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 13, 1938


            The Department of Parks announces that the pitch and putt golf
course at Jacob Riis Park will open for play Saturday, May 14th.  This course
was first opened to the public last August and in the short season it was
open, it was used by 3,369 players. The course has been thoroughly groomed
and is now in first class condition.  A charge of 50¢ made for each round
of golf played also entitles the golfer to the use of clubs and balls.

             The bath houses at Jacob Riis Park, Orchard Beach and Coney
Island will be opened to the public on May 28th. At the same time the game
areas at these locations which include shuffloboard, paddle tennis and
handball will be opened to the public at a charge of 10¢ per person per
half hour. Since last October these areas have been free to the public and
many people have taken advantage of the handball courts during this period.

             Such attractions as fireworks and outdoor dancing which were
held at Jacob Riis and Orchard Beach last year, will be scheduled again this
year beginning with the first week in July.

             Parking is provided at Jacob Riis in the large parking field
which accommodates 14,000 cars. At Orchard Beach a large portion of the new
parking field will be ready and there will be accommodations for 4,000
cars. A charge of 25¢ will be made for parking at both these fields
beginning May 28th.

             Last year Jacob Riis was visited by 1,725,000 and Orchard Beach
by 2,100,000.

                                 # # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 14, 1938


                      The Department of Parks announces the opening today of
two new playgrounds and a comfort station.

                      In Richmond at Midland and Lincoln Avenue near 10th
Street, the playground is equipped for both kindergarten and older children.
The kindergarten section has swings, see-saws, garden swings, jungle gym,
shower basin, and an open play area for group games.  The older children's
area is equipped with a ping pong table, a soft ball diamond, horizontal bar
and ladder, parallel bar and shuffleboard, horseshoe pitching, basketball and
volleyball courts.

                     The perimeter of the playground is landscaped with
shade trees and permanent concrete benches are also provided.

                      The building is of brick construction with slate
roof and houses comfort facilities for boys and girls.

                      In The Bronx at Stebbins Avenue north of East 167th
Street the playground has swings, see-saws, jungle gym, slides, garden
swings, playhouses and sand table. Handball courts and a rectangular wading
pool which can be used for basketball and volleyball in spring and fall are
also included in the design.

                      Here, also, the perimeter of the playground is
landscaped with shade trees and permanent concrete benches have been
installed.

                      These two playgrounds make a total of 258 which have
been added to the Park Department's recreational system since January, 1934,
The total number available today is 366.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 13, 1938


                               "LEARN TO SWIM" CAMPAIGN


            The Department of Parks announces that a "Learn to Swim" Campaign
will commence in Park Department indoor and outdoor swimming pools on
Saturday, June 11th and tennin?te on Saturday, June 24th.

            A meeting of 16 various recreational organizations including the
Board of Education was held on Tuesday, May 10th at 2 P.M. at the Arsenal
Building, Central Park, for the purpose of enlisting their aid in the
promotion of this campaign.

            The representative of each agency who attended the conference
pledged his wholehearted support and cooperation towards the "Learn to Swim"
crusade by conducting similar campaigns in their own pools simultaneously
with the Department of Parks.

            According to available statistics, about 6000 persons are drowned
annually in the United States and approximately 400 in New York
City. Drownings occupy the very prominent position of third place in the
accidental death toll of the nation.

            During July and August when the peak of the swimming season is
reached, drownings and automobile accidents are about on a par in the number
of fatalities due to accidental means. It has been estimated that 50% of the
drownings occur in rivers and that half of all drowning victims were unable
to swim.

          Adequate opportunities for summer bathing constitute a vital
recreational need of the City. Most of the boundary waters of New York City
unfortunately are polluted. With the launching of this "Learn to Swim"
campaign and the opening of the Park Department swimming pools together with
those of the cooperating organizations, it is anticipated that a marked
decrease in drownings will be realized as well as a boon ti City health,
happiness and general welfare.

            The public should take advantage of this opportunity to learn to

swim.

            The list of Park Department swimming pools which will be
available for the people of New York City during the "Learn to Swim"
campaign is as follows:


                               SWIMMING POOLS
                                   OF THE
                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS


                                   OUTDOOR
MANHATTAN

Hamilton Fish Pool            East Houston & Sheriff 'Streets
Colonial Pool                 Bradhurst Ave., W. 145th to 147th Streets
Highbridge Pool               Amsterdam Ave. & W. 173r.. Street. 
Thomas Jefferson Pool         111th to 114th Streets & First Ave.

BROOKLYN 

Sunset Pool                   7th Ave. & 43rd Street
McCarren Pool                 Nassau Ave. & loriiner Street
Red Hook Pool                 Clinton, Bay & Henry Streets
Betsy Head                    Hopkinson,Dumont & Livonia Avonuos

BRONX

Crotona Pool                  173rd St. & Fulton Avenue

QUEENS  

Astoria Pool                  Barclay Street & 24th Drive

RICHMOND

Faber Pool                    Faber St. bet* Richmond Terrace & Kill Van Kull
Tompkinsville Pool            Arrietta Street at Pier #6

                                   INDOOR


MANHATTAN     35 West 134th Street,Manhattan.
              Clarkson and 7th Avenues, Manhattan.
              5 Rutgers Place, Manhattan.
              328 Rivington Street,Manhattan.

BROOKLYN      Metropolitan and Bedford Avenues, Brooklyn

         A list of swimming facilities to be provided by organizations
cooperating in this "Learn to Swim" campaign will be announced later.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 13, 1938

         The Department of Parks announces that the Annual Manhattan Borough
Horseshoe Pitching Contest will take place at the Circle Lawn, West 106
Street near Central Park West in Central Park, at 2 P.M., on Saturday, May
14.

         This Contest is open t o young men and boys over sixteen and will
consist of singles and doubles.

         The winners will represent Manhattan in the Inter-Borough Contest to
be held at the Circle Lawn on Saturday, May 21, at 1:30 P.M.

                                  # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                              May 6, 1938


                             HANDBALL TOURNAMENT


        The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the handball
tournament, both singles and doubles for boys and young men, will take place
on Saturday, May 7th at 2:00 P.M., at Houston and First Street Playground,
Manhattan.

        The interborough games for the purpose of determining the boroughs
that will be eligible to play the final game for the city championship, are
being played off during this week.  Prior to the interborough competition,
playground and district eliminations were held. At present there are 525
handball courts in the various playgrounds throughout the city.

        In the event of rain, the games will be played off on the following
day, Sunday, May 8th. Medals will be awarded to the winners of the
tournament.

May 6, 1938

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                                                  May 6, 1938.


TO THE CITY EDITOR:

            Attached is a booklet and photographs on the completion of the
Henry Hudson Bridge and approaches and the Henry Hudson Memorial Park, as
well as a program of exercises to be held in connection with the opening of
the upper level of the bridge on Saturday, May 7.

            These ceremonies will also signalize the completion a year ahead
of schedule, of the new Spuyten Duyvil channel for the Harlem River ship
canal directly East and in the shadow of the bridge.  The undertaking,
accomplished through the cooperation of the War Department, eliminated an
awkward natural bend in the river and involved 213,615 cubic yards of rock
ledge removal and 271,000 cubic yards of other material.  This improvement is
another indication of the quick tempo in which the water boundaries of land
under the jurisdiction of the Park Department are changing. Later, the bed of
the old channel will be filled in and the reclaimed land added to the park
system.

            The ceremonies will be broadcast over stations WHN and WMCA.

                                ************

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR RELEASE ON SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1938.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            Program of Exercises
           COMPLETION OF THE UPPER DECK OF THE HENRY HUDSON BRIDGE
              AND APPROACHES AND THE HENRY HUDSON MEMORIAL PARK
                                MAY 7, 1938.


11:00 A.M.--Motor inspection of Henry Hudson Parkway, 79th Street to Henry
            Hudson Memorial Bridge.

            Cars will form in line on north side of 79th Street, headed west.

11:45 A.M.--Opening of the ceremonies at the Henry Hudson Bridge toll gates,
            northbound parkway drive.

                                  Speakers
             MRS. ROBERT H. FIFE, President
                 The Garden Club of America, introducing

             COMMISSIONER ROBERT MOSES, Chairman

             HONORABLE JAMES J. LYONS, President of the Borough of the
                 Bronx

             HONORABLE STANLEY M. ISAACS,   President of the Borough of
                 Manhattan

             LIEUTENANT COLONEL DAVID MCCOACH, JR., District Engineer,
                 United States War Department

             HONORABLE A. NEWBOLD MORRIS, President of the Council

             HENRY HUDSON WHITING, Direct Descendant of Henry Hudson

             HONORABLE FIORELLO H. LAGUARDIA, Mayor of the City of
                 New York

             Opening of the bridge will be signalized by the opening of the
                 toll gates.

                       Music by PARK DEPARTMENT BAND.


12:15 P.M.--Conclusion of exercises and inspection of the parkway.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 28, 1938


                      MODEL SAIL AND MOTOR BOAT REGATTA


            On Saturday April 30, 1938 at 1:30 P.M. the Department of Parks
will conduct Model Sail and Motor Boat races at Conservatory Lake, 72nd
Street and 5th Avenue, Central Park, New York.

            Any boy or girl eighteen years of age or younger may enter a
sail or motor boat in any of the following classes, provided he owns the
boat and sails it himself.


     Sail Boats                                       Motor Boats

Class (a) from 12" - 18"            Class (g) Electric and spring powered
      (b) "    18" - 25"                  (h) Steam and gasoline driven
      (c) "    25" - 32"
      (d) "    32" - 40"
      (o) "    40" - 50"
      (f) Constructed models to 30"

NOTE:- All boats to be measured for overall length from stern to bow, but not
       including bowspirt. 


            A contestant may enter Class (f} in addition to the other classes
if his boat is a home built model.

            Boats are to sail along a pre-detormined course and instructions
sill be given to contestants on the day of the races. Contestants must apply
at the judges' booth not later than 12 noon on Saturday for measuring in of
bonts and assigning of race numbers.

            Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded to the winners of
each event.

            Each of the remaining boroughs will hold its own model yacht and
motor boat races on the following dates: -

         May 14   -   Richmond   -   Mart lings Pond - Clove Lakes
             14   -   Queens     -   Bowne Park
             21   -   Bronx      -   Van Cortlandt Park
             28   -   Brooklyn   -   Prospect Park Lake

            Entry blanks for the above events may be secured et the borough
offices of the Department of Parks.

April 28, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 27, 1938

                         Boys' Basketball Tournament


                 The Department of Parks announces that the final game of the
City-Wide Basketball Tournament for boys 16 years of age and under, who are
regular attendants of the Park playgrounds, will take place on Saturday,
April 30th, at 2:00 P. M. at Roosevelt Playground, between the boroughs of
Manhattan and Queens.

                 During the month of April, this tournament has proceeded
through the progressive stages of elimination in inter-playground,
inter-district and inter-borough games.

                 In the inter-borough games, the scores are as follows:

                          Manhattan 31   vs. Bronx 19
                          Queens 30      vs. Richmond 24
                          Manhattan 42   vs. Brooklyn 18

                 The championship game on Saturday between Manhattan and
Queens is expected to be closely contested, since each team not only has
vanquished opponents in inter-playground and inter-district contests within
their own borough but each team has an inter-borough victory to its credit.

                 The Department of Parks has 187 basketball courts under its
jurisdiction. Eight are located indoors in the vorious gymnasia operated and
supervised by the Department, and the remaining 179 are located outdoors in
the various playgrounds in the five boroughs. Now the outdoor courts are
constantly being used by teams of boys and young men who are anxious to play
outdoor basketball after the long indoor season of the winter months

APRIL 27, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 28, 1938


                           CONCERT ON MALL - MAY 1


               The Department of Parks announces that on Sunday, May 1st a
concert will be given on the Hall, Central Park, at 5:00 P.M.  The Brooklyn
Civic Orchestra sponsored by Long Island University and directed by Dr. Paul
Kosek will play.

               This concert is being given in conjunction with the plans of
the New York Music Week Committee and the Municipal Art Committee t o promote
the observance of Ilusic Week locally and to stimulate interest in a variety
of activities which will increase the public's enjoyment of music.

               The training offered by the 3rooklyn Civic Orchestra, which
was formed five years ago, aims to prepare qualified musicians for employment
in professional orchestras.

               The following program willll be heard Sunday.

                                   PROGRAM

1 - Overture in D Major                                 Handel

2 - Suite from "Sigurd Jorsalfar"                       Grieg
               (a) Prelude
               (b) Trumphal March

3 - Capriccio Italian                                   Tschaikowsky

4 - Symphony No. 6 (Pathetique)                         Tschaikowsky


April 28, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 27, 1938


                   The Department of Parks announces the finals of a
roller-skating hockey tournament which has been conducted in the playgrounds
and parks of New York City during the months of March and April.  These
finals will take place at Roosevelt Playground on Sunday, May 1, at 2:00
P. M.  The semifinals will take place on Saturday, April 30 at 1:30 P.M. at
the same location.

                   There has been an unusually large attendance of
enthusiastic hockey fans at the various tournament games. The Borough of
Queens has vanquished the team of the Bronx with a score of 8 to 3$ and also
Brooklyn with a score of 6-0. The championship game, therefore, will be
between the winner of the semi-finals and Queens.

                   Manhattan and Richmond will play off on Saturday, April
30, and the winner of this game will compete against the Borough of Queens
for the city-wide championship on Sunday, May 1 at the Roosevelt Playground.

                   The Park Department has under its jurisdiction 41
roller-skating areas and there appears to be a greater interest in
roller-skating hockey this year than in previous years.

April 27, 1938.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 23, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces the opening today of a new
playground and comfort station at Lee Street between Lynch and Middleton
Streets, Brooklyn.

              The playground is equipped with swings, see-saws, jungle gym,
garden swings, slides, play houses, sand tables and a rectangular-shaped
wading pool which can be used for basketball and volley ball in spring and
fall. Handball courts and a large open play area for group games are also
included in the facilities.

              The perimeter of the playground is landscaped with shade trees
and permanent concrete benches.

              This is the last of the 24 sites selected by the Commissioner
of Parks and acquired by condemnation after authorization by the Board of
Estimate and Apportionment in 1936, to take care of the recreational needs of
neglected neighborhoods. It makes a total of 256 playgrounds which have been
added to the Park Department's recreational system since January, 1934. The
total number available today is 364.

              The building is of brick construction with slate roof and houses
comfort facilities for boys and girls.

                                 **********

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 27, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that the winter and spring
use of the play centers inaugurated September 18 last year, will terminate
Saturday, April 23, so that the areas can be cleaned, painted and generally
prepared for the coming swimming season. The swimming pools will re-open to
the public 10:00 A.M. Saturday, May 28.  Children under 14 years of age will
be admitted free from 10:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. every day except Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays. After 1:00 P.M, on weekdays and all day on Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays, children under 14 years of age will be admitted for ten
cents and all others for twenty cents.

                1,310,100 children and adults have made use of the facilities
offered since the close of last year's swimming season. In the pool areas
handball, shuffleboard, paddle tennis, basket ball, volley ball and various
group games were provided for. During the winter when the weather was too
cold, the activities were moved into the buildings where social dancing and
calisthenics were conducted besides ping pong, checkers, quoits and similar
games.  These games were at all times under the competent supervision of men
trained to instruct in and conduct the activities.

                The City-wide table tennis championships were held at Astoria
Pool to climax the play center season, the team championship going to Astoria
Pool with Hamilton Fish Play Center and Highbridge Play Center tying for
second place.

                                *************

April 21, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 22, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that it has erected signs
numbering all exits from parkways in the city.

                The numbering is consecutive, running outward towards the
city boundaries. All exits for a given crossing or locality are designated
with the same number, so that a person in giving directions to a friend using
a parkway, can tell him to get off at, say, Exit No. 6, to reach the address
he is headed for.

                In Queens, the Kew Gardens loop connection between Grand
Central Parkway, Grand Central Parkway Extension, and Interborough Parkway is
numbered 11.  Grand Central Parkway Extension exits start with 1 at the
Triborough Bridge, and the numbers run out to number 11 at the loop. The
Interborough Parkway starts with exit number 4 at Pennsylvania Avenue, in
Brooklyn, and the numbers run outward to number 11 at the loop.

                From the Kew Gardens loop to the City Line the numbers run up
to 23 at Little Neck Parkway. Number 24 is the last exit eastbound, leading
off the parkway on to Marcus Avenue.

                In Nassau County the Long Island State Park Commission will
continue with number 25 at Lakeville Road, etc., to the end of the parkway.

                The some system will be adopted on the Laurelton Parkway in
Queens, and the numbers will continue on the Southern Parkway in Nassau
County, out to Amityville and Jones Beach.

                The Henry Hudson Parkway is numbered from 1, at 72nd Street,
northerly to number 19 at Mosholu Parkway in Van Cortlandt Park; and the
Hutchinson River Parkway now starts with number 7 in Pelham Bay P«rk and
connects into the Hutchinson River Parkway in Westchester County whose
numbers start with 1 at Sandford Boulevard in Pelham. Eventually the
Hutchinson Rivor Parkway Extension will be continued southerly to the
Whitestone Bridge at Old Ferry Point, and the numbering will be carried in
order to the bridge.

                As additional parkways are developed in the city, the same
system of numbering will be carried out so that as far as possible, one
consecutive system will continue for the full length of any given route.

                The numbers are placed on 6" x 8" wood panels, aluminum
figures on jet black background, and, in general, are located on the same
post immediately under the present signs giving the names of streets and
localities served by the respective exits.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 20, 1938


             The Department of Parks announces that on Thursday afternoon,
April 21, at 2:00 P. M., the children of the playgrounds will begin planting
the 2,000 individual small garden plots throughout the five boroughs. Not
only are the children admitted to the garden but their families as well.  The
first crop will be radishes, lettuce, seallions and kohl-rabi which will be
ready for harvest before the summer crops are planted. The seeds, tools and
the instructor are provided by the Park Department. After the spring harvest,
an entirely new group of children, as well as vegetables, will take
possession of the garden plots.  As the season advances, plots along the
border of the garden are planted by the children with flowers, and
interesting economic crops like peanuts, tobacco, cotton, wheat, rye, seeds
of various trees, etc., to show the products of the 48 states of the Union.

             The following are the largest gardens under the jurisdiction of
the Department of Parks: Thomas Jefferson Park Garden, Manhattan; Fort Greene
Park Garden and Betsy Head Park Garden, Brooklyn; Highland Park Garden,
Queens; and Crotona Park Garden, The Bronx, All of 1xhe gardens are listed
below, by boroughs:

                               MANHATTAN

          St. Gabriel's Garden            35th Street and First Avenue
          Seward Garden                   Jefferson and Canal Streets
          St. Nicholas Garden             130th St. and St.Nicholas Terrace
          189th Street & Amsterdam Ave. Garden
          Thomas Jefferson Garden         114th Street and Pleasant Avenue

                                BROOKLYN
          Betsy Head Garden               Hopkinson and Blake Avenues
          Fort Greene Garden              Myrtle and North Portland Avenues

                                 QUEENS
          Highland Garden                 Jamaica Avenue and Cleveland Street

                                 RICHMOND
          DeMatti Garden                  Rosebank, Staten Island
                                  BRONX
          Crotona Garden                  St.Paul's Place and Fulton Avenue

                                 ***********

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 20, 1938


               The Department of Parks announces that children's pet shows
will be conducted in designated playgrounds of the five boroughs on two
successive Saturdays, April 23 and April 30 at 2:00 P.M. and on Friday, April
22 at 4:00 P.M.

               These annual pet shows are very popular with the "younger set"
of the park playgrounds since they are afforded an opportunity to exhibit
publicly the animals of their particular affections* It is expected that
domestic pets of an amazing variety including small dogs, cats, gold fish,
turtles, lizards, parrots and white mice will be paraded before the judges.

               Entry classifications wfll range from the "Handsomest Cat" to
the "Dog with the longest Tail." The awards will be based on the general
beauty and attractiveness of the pets and the care which has been given them
by their youthful guardians and will consist of ribbons for first, second and
third place winners in each classification.

               Children desiring to enter their pets in this competitive show
can secure entry blanks from the playground director in any of the park
playgrounds.

               The pet shows will be held at the following locations:

               APRIL 22 ·* 4:00 P.M. - BROOKLYN - New Lots Playground
               APRIL 23 - 2:00 P.M. -   "         McKinley Park
                                        "         New Utrecht Playground
                                        "         James J. Byrne Memorial
                                        "         McCarren Park
                                        "         McKibben Playground
                                        "         Kelly Memorial Playground

                                      QUEENS    - Anawanda Park
                                        "         Broadway and 78th Street
                                         
                                   RICHMOND     - Crescent Avenue Playground

               APRIL 30 - 2:00 P.M. - BRONX     - Mullaly Playground
                                        "         St. Mary's East Playground
                                        "         Williamsbridge Playground
                                        "         Charlotte Street

                                   MANHATTAN -     Columbus Playground
                                        "          West 17th Street
                                        "          Inwood Hill Playground
                                        "          83 Roosevelt St. Playground

                                   *******


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 16, 1938


                     The Department of Parks announces the opening today of a
new playground and comfort station at Lafayette and Marcy Avenues, Brooklyn.
The plot is approximately 1.7 acres and was acquired by permit from the Board
of Transportation in 1936.

                     The playground is equipped for youngsters of preschool
age and older children. In the kindergarten section there are swings,
see-saws, slides, garden swings, playhouses, sand tables and an open play
area for group games. The older children's area has handball and shuffleboard
courts and an oval-shaped roller skating track encircling an open play area
which can be used for basketball, volleyball and similar games.

                     The perimeter of the playground is landscaped with shade
trees. Permanent concrete benches are also provided.

                     This playground makes a total of 255 which have been
added to the Park Department's recreational system since January, 1934.  The
total number available today is 36S.

                     The building is of brick construction with slate roof
and houses comfort facilities for boys and girls.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 14, 1938


       The Department of Parks announces the opening of the ten golf courses
under its jurisdiction on Saturday morning, April 16th at 6 A. M.

       Club houses are completed on all courses with restaurants, locker and
shower accommodations and these facilities will be open for use of the public
at all of the golf courses.

       Fees for permits will be the same as last year, $10. for an unlimited
season permit, $5. for a limited season permit good from Monday to Friday,
exclusive of holidays, and $3. for a junior limited permit good from Monday
to Friday, exclusive of holidays. Daily fees are $.75 from Monday to Friday
and $1.00 on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

       The cost of a season locker permit is $5. and the daily locker fee is
$.25.

       Reservations may be made for $1.00 per foursome, at the following
borough offices, for starting time on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

Bronx    - Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue, Bronx Park   Westchester 7-5200

Brooklyn - Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park                 South 8-2300

Queens   - Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens                Cleveland 3-4600

Richmond - Field House, Clove Lakes Park                     Gibralter 2-7640

       The Department of Parks also announces the opening of the clay tennis
courts under its jurisdiction on Saturday morning, April 16th. Hard surface
courts have been open for play since March 1st. Batteries of courts are
located in the five boroughs at convenient locations and aro accessible by
street car, bus and subway.

       Season permits, entitling the holders to play on any of the Department
of Parks tennis courts, cost $3.00.

       Permits may be obtained either by mail or in person from any of the
borough offices which are located as follows:


Manhattan - Arsenal Building, 64th Street and Fifth Avenue, Central Park

Brooklyn  - Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park

Bronx     - Bronx Park East and Birehall Avenue, Bronx Park

Queens    - Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens

Richmond  - Field House, Clove Lakes Park

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 13, 1938


                        The Department of Parks announces that children up to
16 years of age, daily users of the playground at 74th Street and Henry
Hudson Parkway, will participate in a "Big Apple" contest at the playground
on Thursday, April 14th at 4 P.M.

                        Over fifty of the children will participate and a
tremendous amount of enthusiasm and interest is being displayed by the
children in the neighborhood.

                        All contestants will receive apples donated by the
New York State Department of Agriculture, which will be represented by W. J.
Birdsall, State Director of Markets and Henry S. Ortega, Trade Relation
Council to the State Department of Agriculture.

                       Miss Mathilda Fraga, the Vassar College girl, who, as
"Apple Annie", represents the country folk in the apple region will be
present to distribute prizes.

                        The winning couple wiil receive gold medals and a
basket of apples will be given to the runners-up.

                        Music for this contest will be furnished by a
harmonica swing band comprised of youngsters from the playground and Park
Department playground directors will officiate as judges.

                              *****************

APRIL 13, 1938

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------



W. H. Latham
                                                          April 13, 1938
R. C. Jenkins
                    Prospect Park Oreenhouse - Easter Flower Show


   Tb« following is material for a press release regardisg the Annual Easter
flower Show in the Prospect Park Greenhouse.

   The Park Department aanounces the opening of the Annual Easter Flower Show
at the Prospectt Park greenhouse on Good Friday, April I5th.

   Over 300 varieties of flowers are represented by approximately 10,000
specimen plants.

   The major feature of the Show is a large cross, neasuring I4'x27' which is
made up of 4000 Easter lilies edged with light blue hydrangeas. The cross
rises above grass steps over a rectangular area in which is a colorful
display of zsaleas. Treating the cross are unusual specimens of beautiful
pink rhododendrons.

   Flanked along the sides of the exhibit house is a colorful display of
flowers in great variety which include cinerarias, calceolarias, sweet peas,
snap-dragons, lilacs and flowering crab-apples, peaches and cherries.

   Doors will be opened to the Show at 10:00 A..J4. Jriday, April 15th, aad
will be open each day thereafter from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.It. the exhibit
w i l l last for abo«t two weeks dependent on leather conditions.

   The greenhouse Is located near 7th Street and Prospect Park West. It may
be reached by automobile by way of the Main Drive in Prospect Park, by street
car via Vanderbilt Avenue, Smith Street, Union street and 7th avenue trolleys,
and by subway from the 7th Avenue station of the Independent subway; the Grand
Army Plaza station of the 7th Avanue I.R.T. subway.

                                                   H. G. Jenkins
                                                  Borough Director
cc: Logue
    Sherry
    Heaslip 

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[DUPLICATE GOLF COURSES OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT]

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[ANOTHER DUPLICATE GOLF COURSES OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 13, 1938

            The Department of Parks announces that while it has jurisdiction
over all street trees it has no funds with which to plant them except on
parkways. However, it is not only anxious and willing to encourage
civic-minded individuals and groups to improve and beautify their
neighborhoods, but has for the past four years been successful in doing so
particularly in the Borough of Manhattan.

            To assist and protect the property owner, the Department of
Parks, upon request makes a survey and reports to citizens the type and size
of trees best suited to the locality, the number of trees needed, and where
they should be located, after taking into consideration the existing trees,
lighting fixtures and other obstructions.

            The Park Department cooperates further with the property owner to
the extent of securing the necessary permits, furnishing a standard contract
and specifications, supervising the work and maintaining the trees after they
are planted, free of charge. The original costs, however, have to be borne by
the property owner.

                 The cost depending on the type and size of trees includes
not only the tree, but the cost of excavating the hole in which the trees are
to be planted and also the incidental topsoil, fertilizer and other
materials.

                 Attached is a standard form of contract and specifications
used for the planting of 19 trees on East 64th Street between Lexington and
Third Avenues, Manhattan. This work was started on April 4th, 1938,

Attachs.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                  O F F E R

                                                    Date


        The undersigned hereby offers to furnish and plant the trees, listed
in the following "Schedule", at the locations shown upon the annexed diagram,
and to excavate Tree Pits, furnish Top Soil and Manure, furnish and lay
Granite Blocks, and all other work incidental thereto in accordance with the
terms of the Specifications attached hereto. Said Specifications are hereby
made a part of this offer.

        It is understood that the word "Engineer" occurring in the aforesaid
Specifications designates a duly authorized representative of the Department
of Parks, City of New York. It is further understood that said "Engineer"
shall designate the exact locations of trees to be planted; inspect and
approve, or reject, any and all materials furnished and work executed under
this Contract; obtain and furnish the necessary permits from the proper
authorities for the execution of the work, including the use of water from
fire hydrants at no expense to the Contractor.

        Payment hereunder shall be made by you within ton (10) days following
the acceptance of the completed work by the Engineer.

        The undersigned agrees to complete the work within fifteen (15)
working days after the signing of this Contract.

SCHEDULE : Nineteen (19) Platanus orientalis, 3 to 3-1/2" caliper, balled and
platformed, as per Specifications.

PRICE BID: The price for furnishing and planting the trees which includes the
excavation of Tree Pits, furnishing Top Soil and Manure, Staking of Trees,
furnishing and laying Granite Blocks, including the cost of all labor,
materials and equipment necessary or required to complete the work, and all
other work incidental thereto, all in accordance with the Specifications, is
the sum of ______________________________ Dollars ($ ) per tree so planted.


                                        Very truly yours,


                                       (Contractor)


I accept the above offer and         By:
agree to pay, in accordance
with the foregoing terms.
                                                    (Title)
(Signed)

       Property Ovmors1 Committee


              Address
                                           Date:

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                               SPECIFICATIONS

                             SPECIAL PROVISIONS
                                    FOR
                           STREET TREE PLANTING
                                    IN
                              EAST 64TH STREET
                     BETWEEN LEXINGTON AND THIRD AVENUES
                            BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN




        The work to be done under the annexed agreement will consist of
removing existing sidewalk slabs, excavation of all kinds for tree pits;
furnishing, mixing and depositing topsoil in backfill; furnishing, mixing and
incorporating manure in backfill; furnishing and planting the trees;
furnishing and installing tree stakes; furnishing and laying granite block
pavement in tree pits; together with all work incidental thereto, and in
accordance with these specifications and to the satisfaction of the Engineer.

EXCAVATION FOR TREE PITS
        The Contractor shall excavate all tree pits not less than 3 feet by 5
feet and to a depth of 3'-6", and remove the existing sidewalk slab, as
directed by the Engineer.

        Where the sidewalk slab is to be removed, the slab shall be removed
to the nearest dividing joints outside of the proposed tree pits. The edges
of the slab forming the pit shall be finished in a manner satisfactory to the
Engineer.  Any damage to the adjacent slabs or curbing by the Contractor
shall be replaced by him at no extra cost. All excavated materials shall bo
removed from the property and disposed of by the Contractor.

        The soil shall be made loose and friable to a depth of one (1) foot
below the bottom of the tree pit to the satisfaction of the Engineer.

TOPSOIL FOR BACKFILL
        Topsoil for backfill in tree pits shall be furnished and placed in tree
pits to the satisfaction of the Engineer

        Topsoil for backfilling shall be mixed with well-rotted manure and
humus or sedge peat. Approximately one and three-fourths (1-3/4) cubic yards
of topsoil, one-fourth (1/4) cubic yard of manure, and one-fourth (1/4) cubic
yard of humus or sedge peat shall be incorporated and deposited in each tree
pit, unless otherwise directed by the Engineer.

TOPSOIL
        Topsoil shall consist of fertile agriculture soil capable of
sustaining vigorous plant growth. All topsoil shall be free of Japanese
beetle, white pine weevil and other dangerous wild larvae, stones, roots,
rubbish and other objectionable materials.

MANURE
         The manure shall be well-decayed horse or cow manure, or a
combination of both; free from saw dust, wood chips, tanbark, stones, or
other foreign matter, and at least twelve months old. It shall be free from
chemicals used to hasten decomposition artificially and any other injurious
substances.

HUMUS
         The humus shall be a natural humus or finely granulated sedge peat
entirely free from coarse roots, stones, or other foreign matter objectionable
to the Engineer.

TREE PLANTING
         The Contractor shall furnish and plant Platanus orientalis, 3 to
3-1/2" caliper, balled and platformed - caliper for all trees shall be
measured at a point one (1) foot from the ground. Minimum diameter of ball 30
inches.  Branched 6'-8' from ground, straight trunks with single leaders
intact, no abrasions on the bark, no fresh cuts of limbs over 3/4 of an inch
may show, which have not completely calloused over. Trees with broken or
loose balls, or trees with branches broken in shipment, or trees imperfectly
proportioned will be rejected.

         Trees shall be vigorous and free from insect posts, diseases, gypsy
moth, Japanese beetle, frost, sun-scale, winter injuries, serious abrasions
of the bark or other objectionable blemishes. All stock shall be well
developed nursery stock and freshly dug.

         The trunks of all trees shall be wrapped with burlap strips in a neat
manner immediately after planting, to the height of the first branches or as
directed or approved by the Engineer,

         The pruning of the trees shall conform to the best horticultural
practice. Care shall be taken in pruning to preserve the natural character of
the tree. Broken or badly bruised branches shall be removed with a clean
cut. All cut surfaces over one (1) inch in diameter shall be painted over
with an approved tree paint.

         The soil around each tree shall be thoroughly saturated with water at
the time of planting, and as many times later as seasonal conditions require,
or as the Engineer may direct, until acceptance of the work.

STAKING
         Immediately after planting, each tree shall be supported with two
(2) chestnut, oak, cypress, cedar or other stakes, 2-1/2" square by 8f long,
acceptable to the Engineer. The stakes are to be driven firmly into the
ground and wired to the tree, using strips of rubber hose to keep the wires
from coming in contoct with the tree. The stakes shall be placed about one
foot away on both sides of the tree trunk and shall stand in a uniform line
parallel to the curb,

GRANITE BLOCKS
         The Contractor shall furnish and lay granite blocks around each tree.
Granite blocks are to be cut whore necessary, to meet the specifications for
minimum and maximum width of joints.

         Granite Blocks shall be reclaimed and recleaned granite paving blocks
approximately 4" x 8" x 12". The blocks shall be carefully cleaned, to the
satisfaction of the Engineer, of all tar, asphalt or other objectionable
material.

         The soil bed for the granite blocks shall be compacted to the
satisfaction of the Enginoer, before the laying is begun. The blocks shall be
laid to an even surface and shall be laid with the worn surface exposed. The
minimum width of joints shall be one (1) inch and the maximum xvidth two and
one-half (2-1/2) inches. The joints shall be filled with clean, sharp sand,
acceptable to and as directed by the Engineer.

            The blocks shall be laid according to the pattern shown on detail
plan attached hereto.

                             *******************

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 12, 1938


                I have been asked by the Press to comment on a statement by
Philip N. Youtz, Director, contained in his annual report to the Board of
Trustees of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, that the Brooklyn
Central Museum and the Children's Museum are in a bad state of disrepair.

                The Director has considerable zeal and energy which often
outweigh his judgment. Ever since I became Park Commissioner, high pressure
methods have been brought to bear on me to sponsor sums entirely out of
proportion to the requirements of other parts of the park system for various
items in these two Museum Buildings. Two of these requests were for
grotesquely unsuitable architecture; one for a new building for the
Children's Museum and the other for a new wing in ultra modern style to be
tacked on to the classical Central Museum.  Last year the Director campaigned
for the Children's Museum by declaring that the present building is a
fire-trap and dangerous. I promptly advised him to close it. Subsequently, he
decided that his fears were almost wholly groundless and were completely
dissipated by minor fire-escape additions.

                The Brooklyn Central Museum has not fared badly during the
last four years, even if only $37,907. were appropriated in the regular
budget for repairs and replacements. Every year since 1934 we have sponsored
requests for capital outlay and other expenditures which the budget making
authorities refused to consider. However, this year's Capital Outlay Budget
includes items already approved in the sum of $241,580. and Mr. Youtz fails
to mention that bids were opened only last Friday and that a contract will be
awarded shortly for the reconstruction of roofs on three wings of this
building.  The amount made available for this contract out of Capital Outlay
funds was $100,500.

                I have no way of estimating the cost of the Brooklyn Museum
work done by relief agencies during the last four years, but it would have
been a very considerable sum even if it had been performed by contract, which
is admittedly cheaper than by relief labor. An entirely new entrance was
constructed for the larger Museum Building on Eastern Parkway.  This included
elaborate landscaping, granite retaining walls, complicated pavements, new
bronze doors and entire relocation of the service road.  In addition to this,
the Washington Avenue frontage was entirely done over and relandscaped in
accordance with, the new Eastern Parkway treatment.

          Inside the building the old auditorium was remodeled; the gallery
was fixed up; plumbing and heating lines were repaired and the basement was
altered to make more storage space available. Also, there was a large amount
of repair work done on the roofs.

          The old reservoir back of the new Library Building adjacent to the
Museum, and Botanic Garden is now being leveled and the grounds are being
landscaped - another project of considerable magnitude.

          I have elaborated on the work done and contemplated for the
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences so as to demonstrate that this group
is scarcely the step-child of the Park Department but on the contrary has
fared very well since I became Commissioner.

                                  - E N D -

April 12, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             April 11, 1938


             The Department of Parks announces that while much publicity has
been given the flowering Japanese cherry trees in Washington, D.C., New
Yorkers who have neither the time nor means to go to the National Capital to
see the floral display, need not forego that pleasure. On the slope at the
south end of the Old Reservoir site in Central Park, between the lake and the
79th Street transverse road, is a great mass planting of beautiful and
striking Japanese cherry trees which offer a floral attraction of great
beauty and unusual interest.

             The trees in this group came from two sources: Eighty-five were
a gift, in 1934, from the Japanese Chamber of Commerce of New York to the
City of New York, in commemoration of the Eightieth Anniversary of Peace and
Amity with Japan.  These trees, quite small when received, were set out in a
Park Department nursery at 79th Street and Central Park West, where they
remained until construction work on the Great Lawn was completed in 1936, at
which time they were transplanted in their present location.  They have grown
considerably and will bear a great profusion of flowers this spring.

             The backbone of the planting consists of a group of trees given
to the city by a philanthropic citizen in 1920, and planted at that time in
Pelham Bay Park in a garden arrangement. When moved down to Central Park in
1936, they were well grown beautiful specimens.

              To see these trees at their best advantage it is advisable to
enter the Old Reservoir from the North at 86th Street and walk down one of
the long paths on either side of the oval-shaped Great Lawn towards the
display at the south end, casting its reflection in the water of the lake
beneath the Belvedere Rock, the highest elevation in Central Park.

              To the East towards the Obelisk, better known as Cleopatra's
Needle, which stands behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Fifth Avenue at
82nd Street, one will find a striking display of various species of magnolia
trees in full bloom, as well as Forsythia (Golden bell), Cornus Mas
(Cornelian Cherry) and Cercis Canadensis (the Judas tree).  Along Fifth
Avenue in the vicinity of 75th Street there are also many old established
Japanese cherry trees scattered through the shrubbery.

                                  ********

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 30, 1938


               Another active step in the project for the rehabilitation of
Bockaway Beach was taken today with the successful completion by the New York
City Parkway Authority of the issuance of 118,000,000. in new 3§$ revenue
bonds for the refunding and financing of the new work.  Low bidder was:

                   Lehman Brothers
                   Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co.
                   Istabrook & Co.
                   Phelps, Fenn & Co.
                   Stone, Webster & Blodget, Inc.
                   Kean, Taylor & Co.
                   Roosevelt & Weigold, Inc.
                   Paine, Webber & Co.
                   Schoellkopf, Hutton & Pomeroy, Inc. and Associates.

                The New York City Parkway Authority was created on March 11th
of this year under Chapter 90 of the Laws of 1938, for the purpose of
combining the Marine Parkway and Henry Hudson Parkway Authorities and, in
addition, to carry forward the Rockaway Beach improvement project as proposed
by the Department of Parks in its report of December 1, 1937. A construction
contract will be let immediately for the widening and improvement of Cross
Bay Boulevard as a parkway from Big Egg Marsh across Beach Channel to the
Rockaway Peninsula.  Under this contract the present inadequate width of
roadway will be doubled to a six-lane roadway and a new draw bridge will be
constructed to replace the present insecure structure.

                The bridge contract will be succeeded by a demolition
contract to be let within the next sixty days, for the razing and removal of
the present dilapidated and unsightly buildings back of the boardwalk, for a
distance of about a mile and a half between Beach 73rd and Beach 109th
Streets, and for a width of 200 feet.  A connecting cross plaza will also be
constructed between the south end of the new bridge and a new boulevard which
will be built back of the boardwalk.

                Another improvement included in the plan consists of the
installation of a circular grade separation structure at the intersection of
Beach Channel Drive and the new Cross Bay Parkway Bridge, which will
facilitate traffic movement at this important intersection.

          Proceedings are already under way for the acquisition of the land
adjacent to the boardwalk for the mile and a half long distance, 200 feet
wide.  This area will be converted into a narrow park and marginal
boulevard. One hundred feet will be used for the boulevard which will have
two roadways separated by a landscaped center mall.  The other 100 feet
adjoining the boardwalk will be utilized for play areas, parking facilities,
landscaping and for the protection of the boardwalk.

          The New York City Parkway Authority will also be responsible for
the successful operation of the former Henry Hudson Parkway Authority and
Marine Parkway Authority improvements.

          As to the Marine Parkway Authority project, preparations are now
under way in expectation of a large increase in usage of Jacob Riis Park this
season, The present 15¢ toll per passenger vehicle will be reduced to
10¢ upon completion of the widening of the Cross Bay Parkway bridge, at
which time a 10¢ toll will go into effect on the latter bridge also.

          As to the Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge over the Hnrlem River, also
absorbed by the new Authority, rapid progress is being made on the
installation of the upper deck to take care of the tremendously increased
usage of this bridge.  The new deck, which will increase the capacity of the
bridge from four traffic lanes to six, will be completed and opened to
traffic in May of this year.

                    (Explanatory illustrations attached.)


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 26, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that applications for
permits to play on the Department of Parks golf courses and tennis courts
will be received at the follovdng offices:

    THE BRONX    -   Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue
    BROOKLYN     -   Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park
    MANHATTAN    -   The Arsenal, Fifth Avenue at 64th St., Central Park
    QUEENS       -   The Overlook, Forest Park, Kew Gardens, L.I., N.Y.
    RICHMOND     -   Clove Lakes Park, Victory Blvd. and Clove Road, S.I.

                Permits will be issued as follows:

GOLF:

Season Permit         - $10.00 - Good for any day that course is opened.
Limited Season Permit - $ 5.00 - Good for play Monday to Friday inclusive,
                                excepting holidays.
Junior Permit         - $ 3.00 - Issued to players up to and including 16
                                years of age. Good for play week-days,
                                Monday to Friday inclusive,excepting holidays.
Daily Fee - Monday to Friday inclusive, excepting hplidays - $.75;
           Saturday, Sunday and holidays - $1.00.
Season Locker - $5.00
Daily Locker -    .25

        Courses under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks are:

THE BRONX:     Van Cortlandt; Mosholu; Split Rock; Pelham;
BROOKLYN:      Dyker Beach
QUEENS:        Clearview; Kissena; Forest Park;
RICHMOND:      Silver Lake; LaTourette.

                Applicants are required to submit with application, a
photograph of themselves, size 1-3/4" x 1-3/4".

                Courses will be opened for play April 16th, weather and
ground conditions permitting.

TENNIS:

Season Permit - $3.00
Season Locker Permit - $2.00
Daily Locker Permit (for one day only) - $.25
Courts may be used for a period not exceeding one hour.

                Applicants are required to submit with application, a
photograph of themselves, size 1-1/2" x 1/1/2".

                Hard surface courts are open for play at the present time.
Clay courts will open for play, weather permitting, April 16th.

                Tennis courts under the jurisdiction of the Department of
Parks are:

                                         MANHATTAN

Name                Location                               Clay    Hard Surface

Central Park        93rd Street & West Drive                 13         17
                    63rd Street & York Avenue                 4

                                         BROOKLYN

Fort Greene         DeKalb Ave. & Washington Park                        6
Gravesend           56th Street & 18th Avenue                            9
Kelly Memorial      Avenue S & East 14th Street               7
Leiv Eiriksson      66th Street & 7th Avenue                            10
M&C-.rron           Lorimer Street & Driggs Avenue                      21
Lincoln Terrace     Eastern Parkway & Buffalo Avenue          8          3
McKinley            75th Street &, 7th Avenue                 5          4
Prospect Park       Prospect Park W. & 9th Street            25
Sunset              Fifth Avenue & 41st Street                           3
Dreamland           Sea Breeze Avenue & W. 5th St.                       8


                                     BRONX

Bronx Park          Brady Avenue & Bronx Park East                       6
Crotona Park        East 173rd S t . & Crotona Avenue        20
Mullaly Park        East 164th Street & Jerome Avenue        15
S t . James Park    East 193rd Street & Jerome Avenue         8          4
St.Mary's Park      East 146th Street & Trinity Avenue        3          3
Van Cort.Pk.East    233rd Street & Jerome Avenue              8
Williamsbridge Oval Bainbridge Avenue & 208th Street                     8


                                    QUEENS

Alley Pond           Grand Central Parkway, No.Blvd.         10          6
Anawanda             Grandview Ave. & Stanhope Street         3
Brookville           Brookville Blvd. & South Conduit                    6
                                 Highway, Rosedale
Crocheron            East of 215th Pl.,S.of 33d Ave.,Bayside            10
Cunningham           Union Turnpike, North of 193rd Street              15
Flushing Memorial    150th St. & Bayside Ave., Flushing       8
Forest Park          Park Lane So. & 89th St.,Woodhaven       7          7
Highland             Jamaica Avenue & Cleveland Street       13         13
Howard Beach         Nolan & Flynn Avenues, Howard Beach      3
Kissena              Rose Street & Oak Ave., Flushing        12
Triborough Bridge
   Approach          Hoyt Ave.,So. & 21st Street                        14
Wayanda              Hollis Ave., Springfield Blvd.,
                                   Queens Village             2
Playground           48th Street & 30th Ave., Astoria         2
                     89th Ave. & 90th Street, Woodhaven       8


                                    RICHMOND

Walker Park          Bard Avenue, Delafield Place &
                                    Davis Avenue              6         3
Silver Lake          Hart Boulevard, Silver Lake Park         4

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 24, 1938


                  The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announces that the
eight-millionth car passed over the Henry Hudson Bridge spanning the Harlem
River at 11:56 A.M., Wednesday,. March 23, 1938. The car, a Ford Sedan,
License No. 2V1581 owned by Mrs. William Boyce Thompson, 1061 North Broadway,
Yomcers, New York, was going northward and driven by William Schledel, 7
Clark Street, Yonkers, New York. Mr. Schledel is a chauffeur in the employ of
Mrs. Thompson and was alone in the car.

                  The volume of traffic over this bridge since it opened
December IS, 1936, necessitated the Authority to issue a new $2,000,000.
bond issue last July and award contracts for the erection of an upper deck
for the bridge, additional connecting roadways and landscaping through Inwood
Hill Paric from the bridge to Dyckman Street, and also the widening of the
parkway to three lanes each in each direction from Kappock to 259th Streets.

                  This work, which is already under way, will be completed
this spring and ready to meet the; demands of the increased traffic pace.

                  In accordance with the custom previously established,
the Authority donated a fifty-trip booklet of tickets to William Schedel.

March 24, 1938

PHONE TO CITY NEWS

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 22, 1938


                      FLOWERING TREES AND SHRUBS ALONG
                           NEW YORK CITY PARKWAYS


                The Park Department announces that, at this time of the year,
the new and firmly established border plantations of the parkway system,
which, year after year, have increased in development and beauty, will offer
to the motorist successive floral displays of attractive blooms, rich in
enjoyment and unusual interest.

                Because these lands bordering the parkways are not accessible
to the public or encroached upon, it has been possible, without danger of
vandal ism, to group azaleas, mountain laurel, roses and dozens of other
flowering plants in bays and undulating borders for mass color effects, with
taller subjects and hardy flowering trees such as crab-apple, dogwood, beach
plum and Japanese cherry in the rear.

                Starting North from the city at 72nd Street on the Henry
Hudson Parkway to 200th Street arc thousands of flowering crab-apple trees,
many of which are scented, which will bloom in early May.  At 200th Street
there are wooded sections in which pink and white dogwood has been planted to
cover and enliven the slopes with color.  Roses on the guard-rails along the
parkway will continue to bloom through June. At the northern end in Van
Cortlandt Park are acres of wild flowers such as daisy, black-eyed Susan,
goldenrod, butterfly and native aster which will carry the blooming period
through the remainder of the growing year.

                Leaving the city by the Triborough Bridge to go East on Long
Island, the flowers of the dogwood and the shapely, sturdy hawthorns with
their clus- tered white blossoms lying along dark branches like fresh snow,
will be shown to advantage by the dark green pine background.  Other floral
high spots in this section consist of red maple and white shadblow early in
the season. Later, azaleas, laurel and rhododendrons will add their color
interest to particular locations.

                In Flushing Moadow Park, Queens, the area around the boat
basin on Flushing Bay will feature flowering crab-apple trees, while the
Grand Central Parkway Extension through the park will feature dogwoods,
hawthorns and roses.

                Early in April, masses of yellow forsythia and white shadblow
will reach their fullest development along Grand Central Parkway between
188th Street and Utopia Parkway, closely followed by the white blossoms of
beach plum near the latter artery, Japanese cherry blossoms, the first pink
signal of spring bloom, follow the beach plum in the same vicinity. At this
time also, the native chokeberry near Parsons Boulevard will show a white
background against which may be seen the deep red buds of the azalea
preparing to burst into bloom with a riot of color.

             The most brilliant display of the season along the entire
parkway will occur during the latter part of April and early in May, when the
pink and white dogwoods, the azaleas - pink, red and white - and mountain
laurel and early rhododendron reach their fullest bloom with the greatest
concentration in color furnished by the massed azaleas near Parsons and
Springfield Boulevards between the 188th Street bridge and Cunningham Park,
and by the mountain laurels and early rhododendrons near Hollis Court
Boulevard.

             Flowering crab-apples, particularly near the Little Neck Pnrkway
Bridge, will carry the pink and white color display through the middle of
May, while the native and English hawthorns from Union Turnpike to 168th
Street will arrive at their zenith during the latter part of tiry.  The red
and lavender catawba rhododendrons will be in bloom at the same time from
188th Street to Cunningham Park.  Ir. June, bush roses and climbing roses on
guard-rails, along with the native white rhododendrons, show a scattered
bloom through the heavy, rich, green foliage background.

             In early fall, the floral display will be replaced by the
pageant of changing color in leaf and bark which makes native plants so
distinctive from many gardenesque types which have their period of bloom and
are, thereafter, increasingly less attractive as the season continues.

             Those border plantations serve a triple purpose in that they
provide a screen for the protection of adjoining residential property, and
embellishment for the parkways, and because their berry-bearing qualities
provide a much needed and greatly relished variety of suitable and desirable
food for interesting, attractive and hungry birds which return year after
year on their migratory flights.

             To the alert observer, the first signs of harvest will be seen
in June when the blue-black berries of the shadblow will furnish a banquet
for thrushes, flickers, robins and bluebirds, while in July, the red, black
and purple berries of the chokeberry continue to furnish the birds with an
abundant supply of food.

             The following description of birds seen near the Grand Central
Parkway in Queens was received by the Park Department from a long Island
resident who is interested in bird lore:

               "The bittersweet, dogwood, viburnum, red cedar, bayberry
                   and sumac play host to multitudes of birds that brave
                   our northern winters. It is thrilling to see the flash
                   of the bluejays in the junipers. The nuthatches, juncoes
                   and chick-a-dees make merry in the woods even during the
                   heaviest snows. The flickers, song sparrows, robins and
                   catbirds arrive from the South in March and April and 
                   delight in the wooded regions along the parkways. In May,
                   the redheaded woodpeckers begin their cheery tapping. At
                   the sane time, many brown thrashers are seen and they find
                   the shrubbery and vines, such as shadbush, Virginia creeper
                   chokeberry and spice bush, an ideal place for a summer
                   home. With the spring, cherry and plum-blossoms come the
                   sweet singing warblers, thrushes, bluebirds, orioles and
                   swallows.   Then the parkway is truly alive with the song
                   and color of thousands of birds."

                                ************

March 22, 1938,

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 21, 1938


          1938 Spring and Summer Program of Recreational Activities
           Conducted by the Department of Parks, City of New York.



The Department of Parks announces the schedule of various tournaments,
contests, festivals and special events that will be conducted in the parks,
playgrounds and swimming pools operated by the Department of Parks during the
spring and summer seasons of the year 1938.

In preparing this recreation program, the Department of Parks has endeavored,
both by variance of activities and their extension to all age groups, to
present every child, adolescent and adult with ample opportunity to
participate in that sport, contest or activity which realizes for him or her
the fullest measure of enjoyment and satisfaction.

There will be city-wide tournaments in the following activities:-

                                                           APPROXIMATE DATE
ACTIVITY            AGE GROUP                                   OF FINALS 

Holler Hockey       Boys - 19 years and under                   March 29th

Basketball          Boys - 16 years and under                   April 19th

Baseball            Boys - 16 years and under                   August 16th

Softball            Boys - 16 to 19 years
                    Men - 19 years and over                     August

Punchball           Girls - 17 years and under                  August 22nd

Field Hockey        Girls - 17 years and under           Boro-wide-April & May

Twilight Baseball   Boys and Young Men 16 years
                                     and over         Boro-wide-May, June, July

Handball            Boys - 15 years and under) Singles
                    Boys - 16 t o 21 years   ) and              April 30th
                    Men - 21 years and over  ) Doubles

Horseshoe           Boys and Young Men past  ) Singles and
   Pitching               17 years of age    ) Doubles           May 14th

Marble Shooting     Boys and Girls 12 years
                          and under                              May 26th

Paddle Tennis       Boys and Girls 13 t o 15 yrs,) Singles and
                    Boys and Girls 16 t o 19 yrs.)Doubles        July 27th

Ping Pong           Boys and Girls 10 to 14 yrs, )
                    Boys and Girls 14 t o 17 yrs.                August 9th

Checkers            Boys and Girls 15 yrs. and under             July 21st

Chess               Boys - 14 to 17 years                        July 21st

Jacks               Girls - 16 years and under                   August 22nd

During the months of May and June, athletic meets will be held in the various
boroughs for boys and girls between the ages of 12 and 19 years. A city-wide
athletic meet will take place at Randall's Island Stadium in the early part
of June.

Swimming meets will be conducted during the summer months, in the various
swimming pools operated by the Department of Parks. These meets will be both
intra and inter-pool in scope and will consist of individual events, fancy
diving and relays. A "Learn to Swim" campaign will be inaugurated in all the
swimming pools on or about June 1st.

Latent dramatic talent, vocal, musical and dancing capabilities of playground
children are fostered, encourage, and developed in the following special
contests which terminate in finals for the city championship.


CONTEST         AGE GROUP                          FINALS - APPROXIMATE DATE

One-act Plays   Boys and Girls - 10 to 16 years                 June 5th

Harmonica       Boys and Girls - 15 yrs. & under                May 25th
                                     - 16 yrs. to 18 yrs.
                                     - Over 18 years

      (There will be a special division for Harmonica Band.)

Musical Instruments - Boys and Girls - Juniors and Seniors     June 16th (Srs.
                                                               June 19th (Jrs.

      (This contest will include all types of musical instruments.)

Amateur Singing   Boys and Girls - 8 to 12 years
                                 -13 to 16 years                August 19th
Folk Dancing      Girls - Under 12 years
                        - 12 to 14 years                         June 25th
                        - 14 to 16 years

Children's pet shows will be held in all boroughs on Saturday, April
23rd. Ribbons will be awarded to the winners. These pet shows are a source of
real pleasure and delight to both the children and spectators, parents and
friends alike.  Cats, small dogs and birds are paraded before the judges who
determine the winners on the basis of Nature's contribution to their general
beauty and attractiveness and the care which has been given them by their
youthful owners.

For the last five weeks on Saturday mornings between 10:30 and 11:00, the
children of Park Department playgrounds have presented dramatic programs over
the air through the radio facilities of the Municipal Broadcasting Station,
WNYC. These broadcasts will continue each Saturday morning for a period of
three weeks more.

Other enjoyable and educational activities for children in the Park
Department's recreational program are the portable farmyard and the
horticultural exhibit which are transported from one playground to another in
the densely populated sections of the city during the months of Juno, July
and August.

With adequate explanations and appropriate stories by the Department
employees in charge, the children of the pavement world will actually see,
through the portable farmyard, the cows, chickens, goats, pigs, etc., which,
until then, were figments of their imaginations; and will become better
informed on the importance and significance of these domestic animals in
their daily lives. By means of the horticultural exhibit, the youngsters will
learn visually the different common types of plr.nts, flowers and vegetables
and thereby obtain a deeper appreciation and understanding of vegetable and
plant life in its relation to mankind.

Children's festivals and pageants will be conducted in all boroughs on or about
August 20th.

Model yacht and motorboat races will be held for boys unfier 16 years of age in
each of the boroughs at convenient lakes on the following dates:

                QUEENS      -   May 14th            BROOKLYN    -   May 28 th
                MANHATTAN   -   April 23rd          RICHMOND    -   May 14th
                                   BRONX   -   May 28 th

Wading pools also are used for the sailing of children's boats.

A model airplane contest for boys 18 years of age and under xvill take place
in the various boroughs during the month of July. In the model yacht and
airplane contests, it is not unusual for the home-made yacht or airplane to
be declared the winner. Men interested in model sail boating will have a
regatta on the lake in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, on June 4th.

There will be a city-wide Hill Billy contest which will consist of Hill-Billy
songs, dances and music. The contest will be open to all persons 18 years of
age and over. Each borough will hold its own eliminations and the finals for
the city championship will be held about August 30th.

About September 8th, the famous "Barber Shop Quartet Contest" will be
hold. This contest will include the rendition of songs that were popular
among the habitues of the old, celebrated barber shops in the early part of
the present century.  Each quartet will be groomed and dressed in some
particular dress befitting the barber shop era. Appropriate prizes, will be
awarded to the first, second and third place winners of the finals, as well
as to the representative quartets from each borough.

Thousands of persons attend the city-wide finals of the various contests and
activities . Last year, for example, i t was estimated that over 10,000 people,
young and old, from New York City and its vicinity, were present at the Hill
Billy Finals.

Special programs will be prepared by each playground director in celebration of
the following holidays:

                  April 27th        -      Easter Week
                  May 30th          -      Memorial Day
                  June 14th         -      Flag Day
                  July 4th          -      Independence Day

There are various rules and regulations regarding Park Department tournaments
and contests, some of which are:

        Only competitors who are amateurs shall be eligible to compete in any
of the recreational activities , tournaments and contests conducted by the
Department of Parks.

         The winning of a city championship in any contest or tournament will
be determined only after intra-playground; inter-playground; inter-district and
inter-borough eliminations.

        Prizes will consist of a gold medal, Park insignia and sweatshirt for
the winners of the city championships. Those winning second place will be
awarded silver medals and the borough winners will be awarded bronze medals.

        A new type playground plaque will be made on which to inscribe the name
of the team winning the championship in any particular game.

        Certificates of award will be presented to winners of intra-playground
contests and tournaments.

While latitude has been given to all age groups in this recreation program
from the standpoint of active participation in sports and contests, the
Department of Parks is fully cognizant that there are thousands of citizens,
young and old, who desire periods of passive recreation such as concerts and
drama. Therefore, arrangements have been made by the Department for a number
of concerts and theatrical performances which will take place during the
months of June, July and August.

The concert and drama schedules are as follows:

                                       CONCERTS

         The Daniel Guggenheim Memorial Concerts given by the Goldman Band
                            June 15th - to August 15th

                  Mall - Central Park:          Sunday, Monday, Tuesday,
                                                Wednesday, Friday

                  Music Grove - Prospect Park:  Tuesday, Thursday,
                                                Saturday

                  Naumburg Concerts given by the Naumburg Orchestra

                  Mall - Central Park: Kay 50, July 4, July 31,
                                          September 5th.
   
               Judge Prince Concerts given by the City Amateur Symphony
                                     Orchestra

                     Mall - Central Park:        June 28, July 2, July 16,
                                                 July 23, July 30.

                   Music Grove - Prospect Park:  July 3, 10, 17, 24.

                                      W. P. A. CONCERTS

                   Mall - Central Park: After August 15th - Fridays and Sundays

                   Music Grove - Prospect Park: During Summer - Wednesdays;
                                After August 15th - Sundays and Saturdays.

                   Forest Park - Queens: All Summer: Tuesday, Friday, Sundays.

                   King Park   - Queens: All Summer: Wednesdays.

                   Poe Park    - Bronx:  All Summer: Mondays

All concerts, with the exception of Naumburg concerts, begin  t 8:30 P. M. -
Naumburg concerts at 8:15 P. M.

                                    DRAMA

                  Manhattan                               Brooklyn

   Mall, Central Park (After 8/15)            Owl's Head Park - Tuesdays
   Corlears Hook - Thursdays                  Gravesend Park - Wednesdays
   Washington Square Park - Fridays           Kelly Park - Thursdays
   Roosevelt Park - Saturdays                 Prospect Park - Fridays
                                              Thos.Jefferson Field - Saturdays

           Bronx                                   Queens

   S t . Mary's Park - Tuesdays               Highland Park - Tuesdays
   Crotona Park - Wednesdays                  Forest Park - Wednesdays ·
                                              King Park - Thursdays

                             Richmond

                   Silver Lake Park   -   Tuesdays
                   Robin Hood Field   -   Wednesdays
                   Semler's Field     -   Thursdays
                   Fitzgerald Field   -   Fridays
                   Wolf Pond Park     -   Saturdays

   Theatrical performances at each of the above locations sre staged by
   means of a portable theatre. They are produced by the Federal Theatre
   Project of the W. P. A. under the supervision of the Department of
   Parks and will commence sometime in June and continue throughoiit the
   summer*

   Outdoor social dancing will also take place in the parks and playgrounds
   of the Department of Parks during the summer months. The dancing will
   start at 8:30 P. M. and end at 10:30 P. M.

The scheduled dancing locations are:

                                  SOCIAL DANCING

           Mall - Central Park            Tuesdays and Thursdays
           Prospect Park Picnic Grounds
                               Brooklyn   Mondays
           Mullaly Recreation Center
                               Bronx      Wednesdays
           Jackson Hgts. Playground
                               Queens     Mondays
           McDonald Playground-Richmond   Wednesdays
           Roosevelt Playground-Manhattan Fridays
           Colonial Playground -      "   Tuesdays
           Astoria Pool - Queens          Every second Friday

March 21, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 20, 1938


         The Department of Parks announces that a floating bath will be
placed in operation this summer in the Hudson River, at 96th Street, adjacent
to the Henry Hudson Parkway.

         Floating baths date back in this city to 1889, when fifteen were
con- structed at a cost of $12,000. each along the natural boundary
waters. The pollution of the rivers by sewage and waste from haphazard,
commercial developments soon contaminated the water so that they lost their
usefulness and only six of the fifteen original baths remained in operation.
In 1915, these six baths were altered and changed to floating tanks and
provided with showers.

         Under the provisions of the new City Charter, six baths, all in
various stages of disrepair, were inherited from the Borough President of
Manhattan by the Park Department.  However, to provide relief from discomfort
during hot summer days, as well as being a potential asset in community
health, three of the barges will be reconstructed, reconditioned, appointed
in a nautical manner, and installed in the Hudson, at 96th Street, to form a
large, modernized floating bath unit that will accommodate 280 persons at one
time. Each of the three barges have an overall length of 62 feet by 92 feet,
and the two to be used for bathing will have tanks 40 feet by 68 feet and 4
feet, 6 inches deep. The third barge will have dressing, checking, shower and
toilet facilities, as well as a first-aid station.

         Arrangements are being made so that men, women and children may use
the facility at the same time, with separate tanks for children and
adults. Instead of lockers and dressing room accommodations, a basket system
of checking wearing apparel, similar to that used at the twelve Park
Department swimming pools, will be provided, thereby permitting a greater use
of dressing facilities.

         The bath will be open during daylight hours and operated in the same
manner as the swimming pools have been for the past two years.

         This new facility in Riverside Park will be another stop in the
progress of the West Side Improvement, expertly designed to provide adequate
passive and active roireation of all kinds for all age groups.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 14, 1938


                           Close coordination of the planning of recreational
areas with the plans for the new Queensbridge Housing development is
reflected by an announcement of the Park Department.  Since the early part of
the year, Park Department designers and. executives have been conferring with
the New York City Housing Authority in order to insure the provision of
adequate recreational facilities for the residents of the new project.  The
development of the housing scheme makes it imperative to provide these park
spaces simultaneously with the completion of the housing units, as the number
of people--12,000---- eventually to be cared for in the Queensbridge project
is equal to the population of a small city.

                           The Housing Authority has agreed to reserve for
park purposes, fourteen acres lying between Vernon Boulevard and the East
River, and five arid three-quarter acres between the housing development and
the Queensborough Bridge. Negotiations are now under way with Governor Lehman
to turn over the two-and-one-half acre parcel, formerly used as a State Barge
Canal Terminal, to the City, so that the park development can be rounded out
to the water's edge. This terminal is of no further value to the State,
according to Col. Frederick Stuart Greene, Superintendent of Public Works. He
has recommended to Governor Lehman that the land be transferred to the City
for $1.00.

                           The Authority plans provide for the elimination of
Queens Plaza North, immediately adjacent to Queensborough Bridge, which
borders the southerly side of the project. This street is of no importance
either as a traffic artery or for local service.  The street area will add
one and three-quarter acres to the playgrounds, and the City-owned areas
under the Queens- borough Bridge will add three more, making a total of
twenty-seven acres in the L-shaped park.

                           The waterfront park, which includes the former
barge canal terminal will be developed with a broad promenade along the
bulkhead which will be shaded by trees and provided with a number of benches,
arranged to form gossip-centers in which groups of visitors to the park can
hold informal discussions on matters of timely interest. Back of this
promenade, there will be provisions for baseball, football and other large
group games, a com pletely equipped children's playground, an area for active
adult games under the Queensborough Bridge, and an area for passive
recreation opposite 41st Street which, while not planned to extend through
the housing development, will be clear of structures and thus form a long
open axis.

                            The Park area, along the southerly side of the
development, will be devoted to active recreation, with playgrounds for boys
and girls of all age-groups, as well as handball courts, tennis courts, etc.
These playgrounds will extend under the Queensborough Bridge on City-owned
property under the present jurisdiction of the Department of Public Works,
and will be separated from the housing development by a landscaped mall of
limited width which will afford a tree-shaded means of access to the larger
park area with its waterfront promenade.

                            The waterfront park will mark one more step in
the development of the Queens margin of the East River for recreational
purposes.  Two-thirds of a mile above is the eight-acre Rainey Park, while an
equal distance above the latter is the fifty-six-acre Intensively developed
Astoria Park, with its large swimming pool and complete recreational
facilities.

               Queensbridge will be the fifth housing development to reflect
the close cooperation of the Park Department with the Housing Authority.
Playgrounds have been constructed and are operating in First Houses and the
Harlem Housing development in Manhattan, and the Williamsburgh Housing
project in Brooklyn.  In the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, a large swimming
pool, athletic fields and playgrounds have already been constructed and are
under operation awaiting the housing units which will flank them.

               It was learned at the offices of the New York City Housing
Authority that a statement on the Queensbridge Housing development will be
issued on Wednesday, March 16th.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS                             For Release:   EVENING PAPERS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           MARCH 11, and
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             MORNING PAPERS
                                                               March 12, 1938

                 The Department of Parks announces that ceremonies will be
held at Randall's Island on Saturday morning, March 12, marking the
unveiling of a plaque in memory of children who died while inmates of the
House of Refuge, which was formerly located on the Island.

                 The plaque, erected on the southwest face of Randall's
Island Stadium, now the site of the old cemetery where the children were
buried, reads -

                                ON THIS SITE
                            FROM 1852 UNTIL 1935
                             STOOD THE NEW YORK
                              HOUSE OF REFUGE
                     ESTABLISHED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE
                    REFORMATION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENTS
                          IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                             AND NEAR THIS SPOT
                              WAS THE CEMETERY
                         WHERE THERE WERE INTERRED
                         THE REMAINS OF 60 INMATES
                         WHO DIED BETWEEN THE YEARS
                               1878 AND 1932.


                IN THE FEAR OF THE LORD IS STRONG CONFIDENCE
               AND HIS CHILDREN SHALL HAVE A PLACE OF REFUGE

                                              PROV. 14 - 26.


                 The ceremonies will commence a t 10:30 A. M, and the
speakers will include Allyn R. Jennings, General Superintendent of Parks,
who will act as Chairman, Mr. Gordon Knox Bell, member of the Board of
Governors of the former House of Refuge, Honorable Byrnes KacDonald, First
Deputy Commissioner of Public Welfare, and Mrs. Gordon Knox Bell, who will
present the plaque to the Park Department.

                                 ( E N D )

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS                             For Release:   EVENING PAPERS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                          MARCH 9TH, &
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             MORNING PAPERS
                                                               March 10, 1938

            The Department of Parks announces that plans are being prepared
for the renovation of the nine bathhouses that have been transferred to
them from the jurisdiction of the Borough President of Manhattan.  The
baths are located at:

                        81-85 Carmine Street
                        384 Rivington Street
                        Cherry and Oliver Streets 
                        5 Rutgers Place
                        East 23rd Street and Avenue A
                        409 West 28th Street
                        342 East 54th Street
                        232 West 60th Street
                        35 West 134th Street

            These buildings, originally designed for the use of the people
living in cold water flats, whose bathing facilities were non-existent, will
continue to function as public baths, but in a more sanitary, efficient, and
useful manner.

            The redesign and reconstruction as planned by the Department of
Parks will increase the play and swimming pool facilities by modernizing the
present antiquated fixtures and layout. Seven of these structures were built
between 189V and 1907, and the building at 134th Street in 1922. The one at
Carmine Street, although built in 1906 was remodeled in 1929.

            Because of the availability of adequate vacant, city-owned land
adjacent to the 23rd Street and Avenue A building, it is planned to
construct an outdoor swimming and diving pool to supplement the indoor
one. The outdoor pool will be 125 feet long by 50 feet wide by 4' 6" deep,
and the diving pool which will be irregular in outline to fit the plot
conditions will be nine feet deep. This improvement will produce a much
needed facility for summer bathing in the midtown East Side congested
districts.

            At 60th Street, the bath will be renovated so that a gymnasium
will be added to the top floor, and will be connected to the present
inadequate recreation building at 59th Street, which will be renovated so
that locker and shower facilities for the users of both the pool and
gymnasium can be accommodated.

            The building at 28th Street, where there already is a gymnasium,
will be changed so that the second floor, now used for public baths, will be
made into a game room.

            The alterations of the 54th Street building will include the
addition of a play area on the roof, and the Rutgers Place building will be
changed so that an additional gymnasium can be added.  Also, the roof will
be remodeled for use as a playground, and it is planned to connect this
playground with the Madison House settlement, so that a greater use may be
made of the City's facilities.

             The Rivington Street building will be remodeled to provide roof
for a new gymnasium, and at Cherry and Oliver Streets, the roof altered for
use as a playground, while the alterations at the 134th Street building will
consist of modernizing the present bathing facilities.

             There will be a considerable amount of work on all these
facilities in modernizing and repairing the mechanical, purification and
filtration equipment, and repairing and installing piping, heating and
ventilating equipment, all of which will be done by W. P. A. forces.

            Upon completion of the work at these various buildings, the
neighborhoods being served will have the advantage of modern bathing,
swimming and recreation facilities that hrs long been denied them, and for
which there has been a tremendous demand.

                                 - E N D -

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[DUPLICATE ANNOUNCEMENT OF PLANNED BATHHOUSE RENOVATION]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 4, 1938


                  The Department of Parks announces that pernits will no
longer be required for surf fishing at the beaches in Rockaway recently
transferred from the jurisdiction of the Borough President's office in
Queens to this Department.

                  Over a thousand applications for permits were received
last year for this popular sport.

                  Fishing will be confined to the locations listed
below and will be permitted only between the hours of 8:00
P. M. and 8:00 A. M.:

             From Beach 126th Street to Beach 149th Street

             From Beach 19th Street to Beach 73rd Street

                  The Department of Parks does, however, reserve the right
to restrict fishing during these hours if it interferes with bathing.

                                 - E N D -

March 4th, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 4, 1938


              The Department of Parks will open up the track at the Rice
Memorial Stadium in Pelham Bay, The Bronx, for bicycling, as soon as weather
conditions permit, in order to meet the increasing demand for cycling
facilities.

              The present four-laps-to-the-mile cinder track will be
reconditioned and maintained suitably to accommodate track and cycling
organizations. However, bicycling organizations desiring to use this
facility must make application to Mr. George L. Quigley, Park Director, New
Administration Building, Bronx Park East and Birchall Avenue, The Bronx.

                                  - END -

March 4th, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                           For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             March 4, 1938


          The Intercollegiate A.A.A.A. Track and Field Chaapionships will be
held at the Randall's Island Stadium on June 3rd and 4th according to an
announcement made by the Department of Parks. Final arrangements for this
most colorful of the outdoor track meets were consummated at a conference
attended by Asa S. Bushnell, Executive Director of Eastern Intercollegiate
Athletics and Allyn R. Jennings, General Superintendent of Parks, and other
park officials at the Department Headquarters in Central Park.

          A number of improvements have been made at Randall's Island since
the Intercollegiate Championships were held there last year. Practically all
construction work on the island will be completed before the games are to be
held.  A number of new walks and lawn areas have been built outside the
stadium and the entire area reserved for the parking of automobiles has been
concreted.

          To eliminate the possibility of accidents, the discus and hammer
throwing events will be held on one of the new lawn areas outside the
stadium, the same as is done at Cambridge and Princeton.

          According to sports officials the facilities for track and field
events at Randall's Island Stadium are on a par with the best in this
country.  At the final Olympic Tryouts held on July 11th and 12th, 1936,
when the stadium was first opened, Olympic standards were beaten in seven
events. Cornelius Johnson and David Albritton created a new world's record
for the high jump by doing 6'9 3/4"; Jesse Owens established a world's
record of 21 seconds for two hundred meters around a turn; Harold Manning
ran the fastest three thousand meter steeplechase on record in 9 minutes 8.2
seconds; Glenn Hardin raced to a new American record of 51.4 seconds in the
four hundred meter hurdles; Glenn Cunningham ran fifteen hundred meters in 3
minutes and 49.9 seconds; Forest Towns ran a one hundred and ten meter high
hurdles race in 14.3 seconds, and three University of Southern California
pole vaulters went over the cross bar at 14 feet and 3 inches. At the
A.A.U. Sports Carnival held last June, Glenn Cunningham of the New York Curb
Exchange hung up a new world's record of 6 minutes 34 seconds for the
1-½r mile, while at the World Labor Meet, held last July, Elroy Robinson
of the Olympic Club, San Francisco, made a new world's record of 1 minute
49.6 seconds for the ½ mile.

         The Park Department officials have assured Mr. Bushnell that the
track, runways and jumping pits at Randall's Island will be in first class
condition for another assault on the records at the Intercollegiate Games.

                                 - E N D -

MARCH 4th, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          February 25, 1938

                  The Brooklyn Library, which has presented such an eyesore
for so many years at the corner of Flatbush Avenue and Eastern Parkway, in
the Borough of Brooklyn, is not only going to be completed and put in use
but arrangements have been made to provide an adequate setting for the
structure. More than a year ago Borough President Ingersoll urged the Mayor
to complete the library.  The Mayor submitted the problem to the Park
Department and as a result a plan was worked out with the Borough President
of Brooklyn for both the reconstruction of the library and the development
of a park in the rear of the library on the site of the present Mt. Prospect
Reservoir. At the present time, this reservoir is a barrier between the
library and Institute Park.

                   The completion of the new water tunnel in Brooklyn more
than a year ago made it possible for the Department of Water Supply, Gas and
Electricity to abandon this reservoir and arrangements were made at that
time for the transfer of this property to the Department of Parks. The plans
as developed by the Park Department will tie in with the Botanical Garden
and, in effect, will provide a sitting park and passive recreation area at
the Garden and also a setting for the new library. As is customary in parks
of this kind, a marginal playground for small children will be built in one
corner of the area. The Works Progress Administration has already started to
grade this area.

                   One of the problems encountered in building this park was
the relocation of the Water Supply Laboratory, now perched on the Flatbush
Avenue bank of the reservoir. All of the City's water supply is tested in
this small building, the inadequacy of which has been recognized for
years. Arrangements have now been made to construct a new laboratory at Park
Place and Underhill Avenue, using a portion of the site of an abandoned
pumping station. Plans for the structure were prepared by the Park
Department upon information furnished by Commissioner Goodman and Dr. Hale
of the Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity.  The remainder of
the property at Park Place and Underhill Avenue will be used as a site for a
small children's playground.

                                   -END-

February 25th, 1938

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                                                            February 23, 1938

                              RIVERSIDE DRIVE

Compiled by Clarence True, Arohitect,
                459 Boulevard, New York.


     In 1792, a small estate near the present site of Grant's Tomb, was
owned by Carlisle Pollock, the grave of whose little boy, with its
headstone: "To the memory of an amiable child", still exists in the shadow
of that greater mausoleum toward which the eyes of the world so often turn.

     The following is taken from the Seventeenth Annual Report of the
American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, page 123, 129 and 130; 1913.

                      The grave of "An Amiable Child."

     In December, 1911, we received an inquiry from the Department of Parks
as to whether any condition was imposed upon the City when it acquired
Riverside Park requiring it to preserve and care for the grave, known as
"the grave of an amiable child," which is in the park nearly opposite
Grant's Tomb. We informed the Commissioner that so far as we could learn no
such specific condition was made although there is definite evidence that
the parent of the Child desired that the grave should be cared for after he
parted with the property. We also represented to the Commiasioner that the
propinquity of the imposing monument of one of our great National Heroes to
that of an amiable child appealed so strongly to popular sentiment that it
was to be hoped nothing would be done to disturb their relation. So little
is known in regard to this touching little manorial which excites the
Interest of many visitors that we give herewith a few historical facts
concerning the grave and the property.

     The Inscription upon the monument reads as follows:

                                  Erected
                                     to
                                 the Memory
                              an Amiable Child,
                             St. Claire Pollock,
                       died 15 July, 1797, in the 5th
                              Year of his age.

     On the opposite side is the following quotation from Job XIT, 1-2;

             "Man that Is born of woman is of few days and full
          of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower and Is cut
          down; he fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not."

     The child was the son of George Pollock, a merchant of New York City, who
once owned the property. Pollock acquired that property and adjacent land by
three different deeds.

     One of the more northerly parcels he acquired from Nicholas De Peyster
and Francis, his wife, by deed dated August 4, 1796. (Liber 57 of Conveyances,
page 266, Hall of Records.)

     The second parcel he obtained from the same grantor April 25, 1798.
(Liber 64, page 265.}

     The third he acquired from William Moleneor and Mercy his wife April
17, 1798 (Liber 57, page 273.)

     On October 21, 1799, George Pollock sad Catherine his wife conveyed
part of the property to Julian Verplanck, excepting the burial plot.

     Soon thereafter Verplanck died, his will being probated November 30, 1799,
whereupon Pollock wrote the following letter to Mrs. Oullan Verplanek, widows
(See N. Y, EVENING POST, April 30, 1895).

     "There is a small enclosure near your boundary fence (and which can be
extended to join it) within which lie the remains of a favorite child, covered
by a marble monument. I had intended that space as the future cemetery of my
family. The surrounding grounds will fall into the hands of I know not who,
whose better taste or prejudice might remove the monument and lay the enclosure
open.

     "You will confer a peculiar and interesting favor upon me, by allowing
me to convey the enclosure to you and that you will consider it a part of
your own estate.  There is a white marble funeral urn--prepared some time
past to place on the monument, which Mr. Darley will put up and which will
not lessen its beauty.

     "I pray you, Madame, to pardon the seeming officiousness of opinions. I
have so long considered all the grounds as my own creation, having selected
it when wild and brought it to its present form--having so long and so
delightfully resided on it, that I feel an interest in it that I cnnnot get
rid of, but thro time.

     "I have the honor to be very respectfully, Madame, your obliged snd
obedient servant,
                                             "GEORGE POLLOCK"

     With a view to carrying out the foregoing wish, on January 24,
1800, George Pollock conveyed to Cornelia Verplanck a small parcel of land
"beginning at the division line of the land of (Julian Verplanck and the
said George Pollock," in- cluding the burial plot. The burial plot so
conveyed was two chains and sixteen links (143.56 feet) deep and
seventy-eight links (51.48 feet) wide, situated very near the Hudson
river. The deed in which the conveyance of this plot to John Bartow Prevost
(Recorder of the City of Kew York), is recited is dated May 10, 1803, and
recorded in the Secretary of State's office at Albany June 13, 1803, in
Liber M. 71. of Conveyances, page 169.

     The records do not disclose that this burial plot was ever conveyed by
Cornelia Verplanck, but the whole parcel was taken under condemnation
proceedings by the City of New York for Riverside Park.

     In the partition of the Terplanck estate in 1806, Michael Hogan, a
wealthy and important citizen of New York, became owner of the surrounding
property on the west side of the Bloomingdale Road from One Hundred and
Twenty-first street to one Hundred and Twenty-seventh street by deeds from
John Marsden Pintard and wife and from Joseph Alston and Theodosia Burr
Alston, his wife. (Liber 81, pages 403, 404.) He built the house on the
premises, calling the northerly part of his property Claremont and the
southerly part Monte Alta. The name Claremont was given to the place in
memory of the royal residence of Prince William, the Duke of Clarence
(afterwards King William IV), who had been a midshipman with Hogan and who
visited him when in this country.

     In 1811, Hogan conveyed the southern part of the property called Monte
Alta through an intermediate conveyance to Jacob Mark, and in 1821 Hogan's
assignees conveyed the northern part called Claremont to Joel Post.

     Prior to the War of 1812, the property was occupied for several years by
Lord Courtenay. The Claremont property belonged to the Post heirs-at-law when
it was taken for Riverside Park.

     Riverside Park was acquired pursuant to Chapter 697 of the laws of
1867, the City obtaining possesion of the lands in August, 1872. tinder
Chapter 447 of the laws of 1876 Riverside Park was placed under the control
of the Park Department.

                                   * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          February 12, 1938


                 The Department of Parks announces the opening today of the
last two sections of the large recreation center on the site of the old
Williamsbridge Reservoir, located at 208th Street and Bainbridge Avenue, The
Bronx.

                 One section is a small children's playground equipped with
slides, see-saws, swings, play houses, sand pits and a jungle gym. The other
is a game area for elderly men and has backgammon, checkers, chess and
combination tables. Concrete ping-pong tables, horseshoe pitching and
shuffleboard courts are also provided.

                 This 19.7 acre oval-shaped depressed area, formerly the
Williamsbridge Reservoir, was acquired by transfer from the Department of
Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, through the Commissioners of the Sinking
Fund on June 27, 1934, for recreation purposes.  The new development started
in 1935 with relief forces and funds and was formally opened to the public
on September 11th, 1937. Besides these two new sections the area includes a
four-laps-to-the-mile cinder running track, a ball diamond, a football
field, 16 hard-surfaced tennis courts, 2 large completely equipped
playgrounds, a wading pool and a granite faced reinforced concrete
recreation building and field house. The building is constructed from stone
taken out of the old reservoir.  Leading up from the active play area to the
street level are ramps and walks with ample benches under shade trees for
those seeking passive recreation as well as a one-half mile promenade for
pedestrians.

                                   -END-

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Text of 1938 Construction Program. Arterial Parkways in the Metropolitan Area.

                                                            February 10, 1938

                                      
           STATEMENT WITH REFERENCE TO THE PROPOSED 1938 PARKWAY
               CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA


              The bill now before the Legislature (Assembly Print No. 527,
Senate Print No. 384), requesting an appropriation of $2,700,000 for
arterial construction within the City of New York, provides for the
beginning of construction of the Marine Parkway Spur in Brooklyn ($750,000);
the continuation of construction of the Southern Parkway in Queens
($900,000); and the continuation of construction of the Hutchinson River
Parkway Extension in the Bronx ($1,050,000).

              Another bill now before the Legislature (Assembly Print
No. 843, Senate Print No. 603) requests the sum of $875,000 for the
elimination of two serious bottlenecks along the Cross County Parkway in
Westchester County.  This appropriation is necessary to start work from the
temporary terminus of Valentine Avenue, Dunwoodie, to a connection with the
Saw Mill River Parkway ($345,000); and to construct a new viaduct at
Fleetwood, to relieve present traffic congestion over the existing
inadequate structure ($530,000).

              The need for providing funds for the construction of these
important arterial parkway connections can hardly be overestimated.
Landscaped parkways with restricted frontage, and without crossings at
grade, or traffic lights, confined to pleasure vehicles, have proven to be
the most efficient way of providing for a smooth flow of traffic.
Unfortunately, most of the new parkways, excepting in the Borough of Queens,
do not penetrate the city much beyond its border. It is now proposed to
extend them into the heart of the city and to eliminate the bottlenecks in
the Cross County Parkway just north of the city limits so that the whole
network of parkways in the metropolitan area can be tied together into one
unified system.

              The metropolitan area is entitled to a considerably larger
share of the proceeds of the gasoline and license plate taxes than it now
receives toward the construction of modern arteries of travel.  The
metropolitan district should not be required to support a substantial part
of
upstate highway construction, and receive no part of those funds towards
the solution of the most serious arterial problems in the state.

                           *         *         *

                       MARINE PARKWAY SPUR, BROOKLYN

              The appropriation provides for the beginning of construction
of the Marine Parkway Spur connecting the east end of Eramons Avenue,
Brooklyn, with Flatbush Avenue at Floyd Bennett Field and the completed
Marine Parkway bridge over Rockaway Inlet to Jacob Riis Park and the
Rockaways. This is a vital link in the comprehensive Brooklyn
Circumforcntial Drive which will ultimately completely encircle Brooklyn
from the proposed Manhattan - Governors Island Tunnel entrance at Red Hook,
by way of the completed Shore Parkway, Guider and Emmons Avenues to and
through Marine Park to Flatbush Avenue and along Canarsie to a connection
with Southern Parkway (Sunrise Highway reconstruction).  The amount
requested, $750,000, will provide for the construction of the Plum Beach
channel bridge substructure and the completion of all dredging and filling
necessary for the road bed foundation.  A further appropriation of $850,000
in 1939 will be necessary to complete and open to the public this section of
parkway.

              Rapid strides have been taken in carrying forward the Brooklyn
Circumferential Drive project to its ultimate objective since serious
consideration was first given to it ton years ago. The Long Island parkways
have been constructed from the east and have created a demand for their
continued extension. On the west, the Shore Parkway Extension in front of
Fort Hamilton has been completed, Guider and Emmons Avenues have been
widened and reconstructed, and the Sheepshead Bay frontage has been
reclaimed. Finally, plans have been adopted for the construction of the
Manhattan-Governors Island Tunnel to Red Hook, connecting the west side
improvement in Manhattan with the arterial system in Brooklyn.

              The next logical and important step in the furtherance of the
Circumferential Drive is the construction of the Marine Parkway Spur which
will close the gap between Eramons Avenue and the Flatbush Avenue-Marine
Parkway bridge route to Jacob Riis Park and the Rockaways. The comprehensive
reconstruction and expansion progran of Jacob Riis Park by the City Park
Department and the Marine Parkway Authority has provided the residents of
the city and visitors from outside with an attractive ocean resort.

                           *         *         *

                          SOUTHERN PARKWAY, QUEENS

             The reconstruction of Sunrise Highway between Laurelton Parkway
and Linden Boulevard as a genuine parkway, free of all crossings at grade,
has become one of the most pressing needs for traffic relief in the
metropolitan area. This highway was the first arterial project constructed by
the state with state funds in New York City. Instead of constructing a
genuine parkway with service roads, all that was done was to pile sand on top
of the city's water supply conduits and pave a 40-foot wide road.  Several
bridges were built by the city, the most important of which is a temporary
wooden trestle.  As access was left everywhere, adjacent properties were
filled and streets constructed through all of them at grade, traffic lights
had to be installed and the net result of the whole development was a
tremendously used, over-crowded highway choked with traffic and useful only
because there is no other. In spite of the bad planning this is today one of
the most heavily traveled highways in the entire state, carrying
approximately ten million cars annually.

             The completion of Laurelton Parkway connecting Sunrise Highway
with the Southern State Parkway has induced a considerable increase in
traffic on Sunrise Highway and has emphasized the need of reconstructing
Sunrise Highway as a genuine parkway into Brooklyn as part of the ultimate
Circumferential Boulevard.

             The state has already contributed funds for the completion of
the north service road between Laurelton Parkway and Rockaway Boulevard as
part of this project. The $900,000 appropriation requested for 1938 provides
for the continuation of construction. This appropriation will permit the
construction of all grade eliminations required for this parkway on the
section between Laurelton Parkway and Rockaway Boulevard. A further
appropriation of $900,000 will be necessary in 1939 to complete and open
this section of parkway to the public.

                 HUTCHINSON RIVER PARKWAY EXTENSION, BRONX

                The continuation of the extension of the Hutchinson River
Parkway from Goose Creek near the present southerly terminus of the parkway
in Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx to Eastern Boulevard at Ferris Avenue where
it will connect with the approach to the Whitestone Bridge, now under
construction, is another important link in the city parkway system.

                Tying in on the north with the Hutchinson River Parkway in
Westchester County and the Merritt Parkway in Connecticut and on the south
with, the Whitestone bridge connecting the Borough of the Bronx with the
completed parkway system in Queens and Long Island, the construction of
this missing link is a logical and necessary step.

                The appropriation of $1,050,000 requested in the New York
City arterial parkway bill now before the Legislature, provides for the
beginning of construction of the bridges, grading and drainage between the
Hutchinson River Parkway Extension at Goose Creek in Pelham Bay Park and the
Bronx-Pelham Parkway. Additional appropriations totaling $1,900,000 will be
necessary to complete the bridges, grading, drainage, pavement and
landscaping end open to the public this new section of parkway.

                  CROSS COUNTY PARKWAY, WESTCHESTER COUNTY

                The Cross Comity Parkway in Westch©ster County is an east-west
express parkway near the New York City line designed as a traffic distributor
for the Saw Mill River, Bronx River and Hutchinson River Parkways. With
the Henry Hudson Parkway in New York City now open to traffic, the Cross
County Parkway will serve as a vital link in the through-traffic route from
New York City and New Jersey (by way of the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels
and the George Washington Bridge) to points in Hew England.

                The opening of the Henry Hudson Parkway and its connection
with the West Side Express Highway has thrown an increased volume of traffic
on the main arteries in Westchester County. The full effect of the increase
is now being felt acutely and the bottleneck conditions over the present
Broad Street viaduct at Fleetwood and along the mixed traffic detour
necessitated by the gap in the Cross County Parkway at Dunwoodie have become
intolorable.

            The amount requested this year, $545,000, for the extension of
the Cross County Parkway at Dunwoodie will provide for construction of the
railroad bridge, and for all bridges, aqueduct protection, culverts and
drainage structures to the east. A further appropriation of #305,000 will
be necessary in 1939 to complete the project and open it to traffic.

            The $530,000 requested for viaduct construction at Fleetwood
will provide for the completion of the main viaduct structure, opening to
traffic the through parkway route, and relieving the traffic congestion at
this location.  A further appropriation of $350,000 will be required in 1939
for the construction of the necessary ramps, structures, accesses and
lateral connections to the Bronx River Paxkway.

                                          / s / Robert Moses

                                                Commissioner.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 28, 1938


                  A combination tide gate, dam and bridge, one of the major
features in the permanent development of Flushing Meadow Park, has just been
completed at a cost of $586,000.

                  This structure is essential to the use of the Flushing
Meadow area as a park. The dam retains the water which is fed into the lakes
from the large area, of which the Flushing Meadows have always been the
drainage basin.  The tide gate feature permits an over-flow when the lake
level rises above that required, but stops the in-flow of salt water from
the Flushing River and Flushing Bay.  This latter function is of extreme
importance for the protection of plant life from the action of salt water.
The bridge is a connecting link between the park areas east and west of the
Flushing Paver.

                  The structure is built on a series of steel-sheet-piling
cells driven to the sand strata that underlies the area. Timber piles within
the cells support the superstructure. The superstructure, made up of a
series of concrete arches, forms the bridge and tide gate.

                  The tide gate consists of a series of flap doors, so
hinged that when the pressure on the up-stream side exceeds that on the
down-stream, which condition occurs when the lakes are above normal level,
the water may flow out; the pressure due to high tide on the dorai-stream
side, however, will not neve the gates, and so no water can flow in.

                  Additional gates, actuated mechanically, are installed at
a lower level, so that the lakes may, if necessary, be drained.

JANUARY 28, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 28, 1938


           The Park Department announces that it has been granted permission
by the Board of Education to use the site and building of Public School #28,
Queens, for playground purposes.

           The permit for this property approximately one-third acre in area
and located on 115th Street between 14th Avenue and 14th Road, in College
Point, will become effective for an indefinite period starting February 1st,
1938.

           While the Park Department will prepare the plans for a completely
equipped play area and inspect the work, the actual construction will be
performed by the Works Progress Administration. Upon conpletion the Park
Department will operate and maintain the facility in accordance with Park
Department standards.
                                 - E N D -

JANUARY 28, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 28, 1938



                   The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority has prepared plans and
has taken bids on the construction of a pedestrian bridge over the New York
Central Railroad tracks in Inwood Hill Park so as to provide access between
the two portions of the park.  Comeau, Kenney & Finnerty, Inc., of 9
Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, was the low bidder with a figure of
$31,786.50. Heretofore, the only way that this isolated area could be
reached was from Dyckman Street, which is located at the southerly end of
this long narrow strip of property.

                   The present location of the railroad tracks was
originally the shore line of the river. This was true up until ten years
ago, at which time the contractors working on the Municipal Subway were
given permission to deposit excavated rock and soil out in the river, west
of the tracks. The established bulkhead line was located some two hundred
feet outshore of the westerly line of the 1 railroad, but the City did not
avail itself of the opportunity to increase the area of the park by filling
in this land under water. By 1929, nearly two-thirds of the entire area had
been filled and since that date filling has continued in a desultory manner
by small contractors v?ho received permission from the Park Department to
fill in the area with material excavated from nearby building operations.
The filling operations were completed about a year ago but nothing has been
done to improve the condition of the area since the fill was placed.

                   The parkway connections to the Henry Hudson Bridge have
taken considerable area out of Inwood Hill Park and the Henry Hudson Parkway
Authority is replacing this area by tying the newly made property into the
older park area by the construction of this bridge. The topography of the
major portion of Inwood Hill Park will not permit construction of large play
fields and recreation areas, but the fifteen acres which have been filled in
west of the tracks present a flat area which will be developed for the use
of the people of the community.  This development will include the
construction of a small boat basin and boat house at the southerly end next
to Dycknan Street. Just north of this the plan calls for the construction of
four baseball diamonds. These recreation features will use more than half of
the area and the balance will be landscaped and improved with paths and
benches. A promenade will be constructed along the entire shore front,
approximately half a mile in length.

                 The Authority also announces that the seven millionth car
passed over the Henry Hudson Bridge spanning the Harlem River at 9:50 A.M.,
Wednesday, January 26th, 1938. It was driven by Harry E. Butcher of 2054
Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn, a chauffeur for the Safety Fire Extinguisher Co.

                 In accordance with the custom previously established, the
Authority donated a fifty-trip booklet of tickets to Mr. Butcher.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                        January 30, 1938

                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
                                  Arsenal
                                Central Park

                       STATE BUILDING AT WORLD'S FAIR

           The press has asked for a comment on stories from the Capitol at
Albany indicating that the City Park Department is responsible for the fact
that the lowest bid on the permanent State Water Amphitheatre at the World's
Fair is one million dollars over the funds made available by the
legislature.  Several specific instances were cited of alleged insistence by
us on extravagant additions to the plans of Sloan and Robertson employed by
the Dunnigan Commission to design this work.

            Not only are these statements unqualifiedly false as evidenced
by complete and conclusive records, but it is quite clear that Sloan, who
seems to have been chiefly responsible for the statements, is simply trying
to cover up his persistent failure to cooperate with both City and Fair
officials, and his indifference to repeated warnings as to high costs.

           Ever since the Fair program was agreed upon I have been
responsible for all basic permanent improvements and have been advised and
guided by a committee of thoroughly competent City and State officials who
have met every other week to check production, expedite construction and
coordinate the work of the Fair and the City and State governments.  Every
month we have printed a bulletin which has been distributed to the press,
the public and all inter- ested parties.  This bulletin will be printed
quarterly throughout the remainder of this year.

           The only undertaking on which we have had no cooperation has been
the State Water Amphitheatre.  This permanent structure was recommended by
the City and the Fair to the Stato and agreed to by the State authorities.
The money made available by the legislature and Governor was and is adequate
to accomplish the purpose.  We went further.  We actually made sketches of
the plans and turned them over to Sloan and Robertson, architects for the
State Commission.  These architects elaborated the plans. They added to the
ground space without even consulting the City and Fair authorities.  They
refused to give us a construction schedule.  Letters and telephone calls on
vitally important matters addressed to them were ignored for weeks at a
time, and our progress schedules will show that this is the only permanent
undertaking which we were never able to keep track of.

        The evidence is incontrovertible that these architects were making
an unnecessarily expensive plan so as to increase their fees.  An elaborate
marble auditorium was added which we have repeatedly stated is not needed by
the City when the Fair is over. Does Sloan claim that it was the idea of the
Park Department not only to build an entire unnecessary building of marble,
but also to put in it a special suite for the Governor, another special
suite for the Dunnigan commission with a private kitchen, and two elevators
to carry people up eighteen and one-half feet?  Does Sloan think we sat up
at night figuring out how to put marble doors on the fire hose cabinets, or
does he concede this and other enormously expensive gadgets were his own
idea?

        These architects refused for many weeks to make necessary borings,
persisting in an effort to get this work done for them free by the City or
the Fair. Today they are at least six months behind in their construction
schedule, and one of the important reasons for high bids is that double and
triple shifts will be required to get the building done on time, and they
have not even driven a test pile.  In the meantime, the City building, which
is the only other large permanent building on Flushing Meadow, has reached
the stage of laying the second floor, the foundations and steel having been
entirely completed.

       As to the specific statements made at Albany, it is stated that the
Park Department asked for opera seata, and it is implied that these are some
kind of expensive plush chairs such as are found in the Metropolitan Opera
House. This is sheer unadulterated bunk.  The Park Department recommended
that seats be of the kind that can be raised and lowered so as permit people
to go in and out easily and to provide reasonable comfort.  The seats we
recommended are precisely like those built in the center section of the
Randall's Island stadium and in other similar stadiums throughout the
country.  They are economical and serviceable. Plain wooden, backless
benches would not be a satisfactory solution of this problem.

         It was further stated, presumably by Sloan, that ninety thousand
dollars was added to his cost because the Park Department insisted upon
elaborate food bars.  This is a grotesque misstatement.  A total of only
three food bars was asked for and it was not required that they be equipped.
In other words, what the Park Department asked for was space for three food
bars.  The elaborate stone facing and other trimmings added by the
architects around the food bar space was their own idea and represents
nothing which the City wants, much less insists upon.

          The statement that the City or the Fair agreed to build the stage
and to relieve the architects of this expense is too foolish for serious
comment.  What good would a water amphitheatre be, or any other theatre,
without a stage?  It is true that the Fair corporation agreed to contribute
one hundred thousand dollars toward the cost of the stage or any other
over-run, but this is a matter over which I have no control, and which no
doubt Mr. Whalen can explain.  The fact is that the architects made the
stage just about twice as elaborate as it needed to be and in the face of
warnings that they should not do so.

          At the recent meeting of the State Commission in Albany there were
a lot of recriminations.  From what I can learn they were due primarily to
the fact that most of the members of the State Commission had not paid the
slightest attention to the work of the commission and left the whole matter
to the chairman who in turn left it to the architects.

          There is to be a meeting this afternoon of engineers and
architects representing the City and the Fair with a committee of the State
Commission and their architects.  If Sloan will stop his childish antics,
our technical men and those of the Fair can tell him in a couple of hours
how to cut down his plans so that they will come within the State
appropriation and be entirely satisfactory to both the City and the Fair.

             The whole question of adjustments can be settled this
afternoon.  If, however, there are any responsible people who want to pursue
this question further, the entire records of the Park Department and I
assume those of the Fair, will be made available.  In a recent personal
memorandum to the Governor on this subject, I suggested a means by which he
could acquaint himself with all the facts, and offered the fullest
cooperation.  I do not see any particular benefit to be derived from wasting
further time on this subject, but I do not intend that the City Park
Department shall be made the goat in the matter and would suggest to Sloan
and Robertson that they watch their step very carefully before they pursue
this subject any further.

                                              ROBERT MOSES
                                                   Commissioner.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 19, 1938


        The Department of Parks announces an Ice Skating Carnival for Friday
evening, January 21st, starting at 8: 00 P. d., on Conservatory Lake opposite
74th Street and 5th Avenue, in Central Park.

        Entries for the events listed below will be received by mail or
telephone, Regent 4-1000 - Extension 89, up to 4:00 P.M., Friday, January
21st.

 BOYS & MEN                            GIRLS & WOMEN

100 yd. dash - Junior              100 yd. dash - Junior
220 yd. dash - Junior              220 yd. dash - Junior
220 yd. dash - Intermediate        220 yd. dash - Intermediate
440 yd. dash - Intermediate        440 yd. dash - Intermediate
220 yd. dash - Senior              220 yd. dash - Senior
880 yd. dash - Senior              880 yd. dash - Senior
880 yd. dash - Open                220 yd. dash - Open
Mile race    - Open

        No post entries will be considered.

        The first three (3) winners in the above events will be awarded
appropriate medals and will be eligible to compete in the Final Events in a
Borough ride Ice Carnival to be held at a later date.

        During the racing events, there will be in the center of the arena a
special Figure and Fancy Skating Contest.  Prizes will be awarded for these
events also.

        Accommodations v/ill be provided for spectators on park bleachers
erected around the Lake.

JANUARY 19TH, 1938               - E N D -

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                MEMORANDUM ACCOMPANYING NEW YORK CITY PARKWAY
                               AUTHORITY BILL


         This bill is designed to provide a method of financing the cost of
widening Beach Channel Bridge on Cross Bay Boulevard in the Borough of Queens
and of constructing a parkway between Cross Bay Boulevard and the boardwalk
on Rockaway Beach and an ocean parkway parallel to the boardwalk with
incidental beach and park improvements.

         By the provisions of the new City Charter, Rockaway Beach is placed
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks.

         The Commissioner of Parks had a survey made of the condition of this
beach which indicated it was too narrow, overcrowded, commercially exploited,
and that there were insufficient traffic approaches to take care of present
needs, and. that traffic was bound to increase.

         The Commissioner recommended to the Mayor that certain improvements
should be made at once and suggested that the main Cross Bay Boulevard bridge
be widened and made a toll structure.

         The most serious problems on the Rockaway Peninsula are lack of
sufficient traffic arteries, lack of parking spaces, the narrowness of the
beach area and the danger from erosion.  The present dilapidated buildings
adjoining the boardwalk and the crowded old frame tenements and rooming
houses on the streets leading to the boardwalk, are a fire and health menace.
Street congestion is so bad at times that fire apparatus answering alarms is
brought to a standstill.

         On many occasions during the summer, thousands of cars are backed up
for miles because of the bottleneck on the Cross Bay Boulevard and the lack
of east and west highway arteries.

         At the request of the Borough President of Queens, funds were made
available to the former Department of Plant and Structures for the making of
plans for the widening of Beach Channel bridge on Cross Bay Boulevard, but
no-ordinary city funds were made available or are in sight for actual
construction.

         To the west of Cross Bay Boulevard is Marine Parkway Bridge under
the jurisdiction of Marine Parkway Authority, on which a charge of fifteen
cents is made for each pleasure car and higher rates for each truck crossing
the bridge.  It is proposed to combine these two arteries under one Authority
and charge a toll of ten cents per passenger car on Cross Bay Boulevard and
reduce the Marine Parkway Bridge toll to ten cents. Trucks will continue to
pay a somewhat higher charge.  It is further proposed to combine with these
two projects the Henry Hudson Parkway now under the Jurisdiction of the Henry
Hudson Parkway Authority.  This will centralize in one administration all the
authorities in New York City which are under the control of the Commissioner
of Parks, resulting in increased administrative efficiency and economy.
Furthermore, the Income from Henry Hudson parkway has exceeded all
expectations and by combining it with the other projects, the amount of money
necessary for the additional improvements can be borrowed at advantageous
interest rates. The Marine Parkway Authority is authorized to issue bonds to
the total amount of #10,600,000, of which $6,000,000 are outstanding, and the
Henry Hudson Parkway Authority is authorized to issue bonds to the total
amount of $8,000,000,. of which $5,100,000 are outstanding.  It is proposed
to authorize the new authority to issue bonds to the total amount of
$18,000,000 authorized by the present two authorities and for no more, and
from the proceeds of sale of $18,000,000.  bonds to retire the outstanding
bonds of Marine Parkway Authority and Henry Hudson Parkway Authority and use-
the balance for widening of Beach Channel Bridge, and for parkway and beach
improvements.  The City of New York will also be required to make a
contribution for additional land.  The completion of these improvements on
the Rockaway peninsula, besides relieving the traffic problem and providing
greatly increased and improved public usage of the beach, will eliminate the
most undesirable developments along the- boardwalk and increase the value of
property throughout the whole Rockaway Peninsula.

         Mayor LaGuardia is requesting Governor Lehman to send to the
Legislature an emergency message under the home rule section of the
constitution.

         The arrangements for the necessary financing have already been
discussed with investment banking firms and will proceed promptly on the
passage of this act so that actual construction of improvements can begin in
the spring.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 16, 1938


               The United States Navy has authorized the expenditure of funds
for the improvement of the surroundings of the Dover Patrol Memorial in Fort
Hamilton Park, Brooklyn.  Contract plans have been prepared by the Navy from
a landscape design made by the Department of Parks.

               A formal plaza, paved with asphalt blocks and bordered with a
panel of bluestone flagging, will be constructed around the memorial
shaft. New benches, backed by low evergreen planting outlining the shape of
the pla2a will be installed.

               The 81-foot pyramidal shaft, built of grey granite, stands on
a commanding site near the shore of the Narrows where one may obtain
unobstructed views of Lower New York Bay and the ocean beyond. Existing large
trees on the north side of the shaft form a solid green bank against which
the monument is clearly outlined, making it visible far at sea.

               In the design for the extension of the Brooklyn Shore Parkway,
a new bridge will provide access from the Shore Road and Fourth Avenue to the
parkway.  In connection with this work, the existing roads will be rearranged
to permit the construction of a large open lawn area formally bordered with
shade trees, with the memorial as a focal point at the end of the mall.  This
mall will terminate in an overlook at the brow of the hill, immediately
adjacent to the parkway, where extensive views may be obtained of the parkway
around the half moon of Gravesend Bay.

               The monument was designed by Sir Astor Webb & Sonf Architects,
and erected in 1931, from funds provided by public subscription in Great
Britain.  Identical monuments have been erected at Dover, England, and Cap
Blanc Nez, France, as British tributes to the American Navy's part in
patrolling the Eng- lish Channel during the World War.

                                    -END-

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 14, 1938


                     The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority announces that the
lower level drive of the parkway between Dyckman Street and the George
Washington Bridge will be opened to the public at noon on Saturday, January
15th.  This additional link in the Henry Hudson Parkway system is a one-way
southbound artery.

                     Concurrent with the opening of this new lower level road
through Fort Washington Park, Riverside Drive from the George Washington
Bridge to Dyckman Street will become one-way, northbound, for motorists
proceeding to the Henry Hudson Bridge, Dyckaan Street, Broadway and points
north.

                     From Tuesday, February 1st, to Tuesday, March 1st
inclusive, while the new upper deck of the Henry Hudson Bridge is being
erected to care for increased traffic, the bridge will be closed on weekdays
from 10 A.M.  to 4 P.M.  At all other hours, as well as on Saturdays, Sundays
and Holidays, the bridge will be open to traffic.

                     The upper bridge decking, the widening of the existing
parkway north of the bridge and the nev; approach through Inv/ood Hill Park
will be completed and opened to the public in May of this year.

                     When completed, the present level of the bridge and the
present parkway drive through Inwood Hill will be used for southbound traffic
only, and the new upper deck and the new roadway through Inwood will be used
for traffic in the opposite direction.  Pedestrian underpasses are provided
under the parkway drives in Inwood Hill so that they do not split the park in
half. The toll gates at the bridge will be increased in number from the
present total of eight to eight in each direction. This work will mark the
completion of the Henry Hudson Parkway, one of the most important urban
express arteries in the country, which permits free flowing traffic to
proceed from Canal Street in Manhattan to the city line at Westchester
County.

                                   - END -

ATTACH.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 10, 1938


      Governor Lehman recently instructed Dr. William J. Tiffany,
Commissioner of Mental Hygiene in the State, and Mr. William E. Haugaard,
State Architect, to meet with representatives of Park Commissioner Moses to
prepare a preliminary plan for the evacuation of Ward's Island which in
accordance with State law must be entirely vacated by 1943.

      As a result of the conference held on November 20th, a tentative
agreement was made which will permit the Department of Parks to proceed with
construction in the southeasterly corner of the Island, between Hell Gate
Bridge and the Triborough Bridge. This section is now the site of a group of
old buildings, erected as temporary structures during the war, which for the
most part have been vacant for some time. This area will be vacated by the
first of the year and the Park Department will proceed to fence it and
demolish the buildings.  This plot, which contains 37 acres, will be
completed and opened to the public in 1939. It was also tentatively agreed
that, prior to the complete evacuation of the Island, the Park Department
would be allowed to supplement the existing fine growth on the Island with
additional trees so that when the work was completed and the entire Island
opened to the public, these trees would be well established and have the
advantage of the growth of the intervening years.

      Plans are now being formulated by the Department of Mental Hygiene and
by the State Architect to provide accommodations in other institutions for
the patients, employees and staff now occupying the other areas of the
Island.  These plans contemplate the progressive elimination of existing
buildings by the Park Department as the State withdraws, starting in the area
east of the Triborough Bridge and gradually extending into areas to the west
until all are finally removed in 1943. This will permit a program of park
development starting now and progressing systematically to its completion
with gradually increasing recreational facilities for the public.

      When completed, the entire Island south and west of the Hell Gate
Bridge structure, a tract of 177 acres, will be devoted to a carefully
balanced combination of active and passive recreation areas. A new foot
bridge will provide access from 103rd Street in Manhattan.  Three large play
fields will provide needed baseball facilities for the children of the upper
east side, while a picnic grove and large landscaped lawn in the southeastern
corner will afford a place for quiet recreation for older people. For
pedestrians from the Bronx and Queens, a ramp will be constructed from the
Triborough Bridge structure which will land visitors alongside of a bus
station, serving those who come to the Island in that type of
conveyance. When the intensive development of the Island is complete, it will
offer an area equal in size to that portion of Central Park between Fifth
Avenue and Central Park West running from 99th Street to 110th Street.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            January 6, 1938


            The Park Department announces that a bronze statue of Henry
Hudson was erected today on top of the Henry Hudson Memorial column which
stands as a landmarker at Spuyten Duyvil opposite 227th Street, and which was
dedicated by Governor Charles Evans Hughes during the Hudson-Fulton
celebration in 1909. The statue was furnished by the Henry Hudson Parkway
Authority, which retained Earl H. Gruppe as sculptor, to model the statue
from a photograph of an original plaster model.  The original modeled by Karl
Bitter, N.A., the eminent sculptor who died in 1915, disappeared after being
placed on exhibition in an endeavor to raise funds for the statue. Mr. Gruppe
was associated for years with Mr. Bitter.

             The statue, 16 feet in height, represents the famous navigator
and explorer clad in rough sea-faring garments, standing erect with one hand
near the hilt of his sword, gazing out on the river named in his memory.

             As soon as the workmen complete anchoring the statue in place,
the sectional steel tubing scaffolding used in erection will be removed and
work in connection with the base of the 100 foot fluted column of doric
design will progress so that it will be completed by the time the upper level
of the Henry Hudson Bridge and its approaches are opened to the public this
spring.

             The north and south faces of the base of the monument will
contain bronze bas-reliefs, each 7 feet 2 inches by 9 feet six inches. These
will also be executed by Mr. Gruppe. The front bronze bas-relief of Henry
Hudson Monument shows Henry Hudson receiving his commission from the Dutch
East India Co., and the rear bas-relief shows the first fur trading post
established on Manhattan Island.

             Henry Hudson Memorial Park in which the statue is located is
being redesigned and reconstructed to make a fitting setting for the monument
and to provide needed recreation for the public.  The entire park will be
fenced in; broad colprovia walks will be constructed; a small children's play
area equipped with apparatus will be provided, as well as permanent concrete
benches. The plaza around the base of the monument will be paved with
bluestone; lawn areas will be regraded and seeded, and planting areas
generously provided with small and large trees. This work will also be
completed for the opening of the uniner level of the bridge.

JANUARY 6, 1938


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            January 4, 1938


                        The Department of Parks announces the opening today
of two new playgrounds.

                        In the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn at the Old
Broadway Ferry Terminal, at the foot of Broadway and Kent Avenue, which was
acquired from the Department of Plant and Structures through the Sinking Fund
Commission on October 20, 1934, there is a new playground equipped with
swings, see-saws and slides for small children, and shuffleboard, handball,
horseshoe pitching, basketball and volleyball courts for older children and
adults. Permanent concrete benches under shade trees are provided for those
seeking passive recreation.

                        In Queens, at 34th Avenue between 96th Street and
Junction Boulevard, the new playground has slides, swings, see-saws, sand
table, shuffleboard and handball courts. A rectangular wading pool which can
be used for basketball and volleyball in spring and fall is also provided.
Shade trees and permanent concrete benches are included in the landscape
treatment. In this playground there is also a new building of brick
construction, with comfort facilities for boys and girls.

                        These two playgrounds make a total of 253 which have
been added to the Park Department's recreational system since January, 1934.
Fifty-eight of these were opened to the public during the year 1937, The
total number available today is 361.

NOTE: Phoned to City News Association as per A. R. Jennings' instructions.

JANUARY 4, 1938

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 
7/2/38   - 764 - Announcementof 5 new playgrounds and one redesigned and
                 enlarged playground. Queens: 14th St., south pf 31st ave.,
                 adjacent to the Astoria Health Center. Brooklyn: New York
                 and Clarkson Aves. 23rd St., between 4th and 5th aves. Ave
                 P. and S. 4th St. Total of 261 additional playgrounds to the
                 Park System. Total available today is 369. 

7/1/38   - 765 - Announcement by the New York City Parkway Authority that
                 wrecking contractors are demolishing structures within area
                 of proposed ocean front parkway between Beach 73d and Beach
                 109th Sts and within area of approaches to Cross Bay Parkway
                 Bridge over Beach Channel.  

7/1/38   - 766 - Announcement of 369 playgrounds open during the summer from
                 9 a.m., to 9 p.m. Also listing of Pools for the summer
                 months.

7/5/38   - 767 - Details of the entourage of the Crown Prince of Sweden to
                 take place Tuesday, July 5th by motor. 

7/8/38   - 768 - Announcement of a 2-1/2 mile stretch of Long Island Motor
                 Parkway extending from Horace Harding B oulevard to Alley
                 Pond Park will be opened Saturday, July 9th, at kk a.m.,
                 for the exclusive use of bicyclists.

7/8/38   - 769 - Announcement of gift of white albino turtle for the Central
                 Park Zoo from Mr. Louis Kasin, an importer.

7/8/38   - 770 - Listing of tournaments and schedules conducted by the Park
                 Department Playgrounds during the months of July and
                 August.

7/8/38   - 771 - Detailed announcement of the Community Singing at Washington
                 Square Park.

7/12/38  - 772 - Announcement of another new baseball diamond at Randall's
                 Island, to be opened for play July 15th. 

7/13/38  - 773 - Announcement of bids opened on July 11th for installation of
                 an 8 ft. chain link fence along the westerly boundary of
                 Flushing Meadow Park. 

7/13/38  - 774 - Announcement and listing of locations throughout the city
                 where community singing will be conducted.

7/13/38  - 775 - Announcement of the termination of the present week's
                 production of operettas at Jones Beach and Randall's Island,
                 July 16th and 17th, due to Labor trouble.  Other activities
                 at Jones Beach and Randall's Island listed.

7/13/38  - 776 - Rules and regulations relative to amateur photographic
                 contest, depicting "Youth and Age in our City Parks and
                 Playgrounds" to take place in all the parks and park
                 playgrounds in the City 

7/13/38  - 777 - Bids opened on July 11th for the repaving of Grand Central
                 Pkwy between St.Michael's Cemetery and Union Turnpike.
                 Resume of work to be done.

7/24/38  - 778 - Announcement of the closing of golf courses in Queens and
                 Bronx one day each week, due to tremendous overplay on
                 links.  Days and Courses listed. 

7/27/38  - 779 - Announcement of Checker and Chess tournaments during the
                 month of August. Resume of activities in Parks and
                 Playgrounds and details of tournaments.

7/27/38  - 780 - Solicitation of funds by Park Employees in Rockaway Beach
                 are prohibited.

7/27/38  - 781 - Announcement of girls of Park Dept. playgrounds in
                 Bklyn. are attending practice sessions for the Annual Dance
                 Festival, to take place on Long Meadow, Prospect Park,
                 Saturday, August 20, at 2:30 p.m. Details given.

7/27/38  - 782 - Copy of letter from Mr. Moses to Deputy Mayor, Henry
                 H. Curran relative to Monuments in the city.

7/28/38  - 783 - Bids will be taken on August 12th, for reconstruction of
                 St. Mary's Park, Bronx, for which the Board of Estimate
                 appropriated $138,000, today. Details of work listed.  

7/28/38  - 784 - A sequel to the Traveling Farm Yard, which has completed its
                 tour of city playgrounds, a "Bit of Country" on wheels will
                 begin its tour of siitjc city playgrounds August 1st, at 10
                 a.m. A description. of same with playgrounds and dates listed.

8/4/38   - 785 - Opening of Floating Baths at Hudson River & 96th St.

8/8/38  - 785A - Bicycle plans for all boroughs. (Booklet)

8/10/38  - 786 - Demolition of Post Office in City Hall Park

8/11/30  - 787 - Life Guard Meet to be held at Jacob Riis Park on. August 24th.

8/15/38  - 788 - Statement of Park Commissioner on Board of Education
                 Recreational Facilities now shut up, which should be open to
                 the public and on lack of cooperation with_the Park Dept.

8/15/38  - 789 - Finals of Barber Shop Quartet.

8/15/38  - 790 - 83 softball areas in park system.   Number of teams
                 throughout the five boroughs.

8/16/38  - 791 - Central Park Zoo - gfft of lion.
 
8/18/38  - 792 - World's Fair - completion of paving walks & road in Boat
                 Basin area.

8/18/38  - 793 - Jacob Riis Park - Life Guard Tournament

8/23/38  - 794 - Astoria Pool - Swimming & Diving Championship

9/6/38   - 795 - Central Park - Barber Shop Contest

9/6/38   - 796 - Tree planting.

9/12/38  - 797 - Revenue producing report.

9/13/38  - 798 - Prospect Park Zoo - Gift of elephant from Abraham & Straus
                 Dept. Store

9/14/38  - 799 - Geo. H. Cromwell Pier, Richmond - U. S. Maritime Commission
                 gives permission for visitors on sailing ship, Tusitala.

9/15/38  - 800 - City-wide finals of Shuffleboard Tournament at North Meadow,
                 Central Pk

9/21/38  - 801 - Model Boat Regatta to be Conducted in Prospect Pk. 

9/22/38  - 802 - State Dept. of Mental Hygiene to locate school adjacent to
                 Willowbrook Park. Description of Parkway plans for Staten
                 Island.

9/23/38  - 803 - Bicycling permitted on Rockaway Beach and Coney Island
                 boardwalks.

9/23/38  - 804 - Sale of balloons in Central Park Zoo.

9/28/38  - 805 - Finals of Magic Contest on Mall, Central Pk.

10/3/3 8 - 806 - Photographs submitted for Amateur Photo Contest on display
                 at American Museum of Natural History.

10/8/38  - 807 - Children's Harvest in Park Gardens.

10/10/38 - 808 - Record of Commissioner Moses' comments before Board of
                 Estimate on dumping in Jamaica Bay.

10/12/38 - 808A- Queens and Brooklyn must give up Circumfrential

10/14/38 - 809 - Completion of reconstruction of Mt. Morris Pk.

10/14/38 - 810 - Final rounds of N. Y. Municipal Golf Championship play at
                 Forest Pk. Golf Course.

10/14/38 - 811 - Bids on contract for alterations to Natatorium Bldg. at Rice
                 Memorial in Pelham Bay Pk. 

10/17/38 - 812 - City-wide Whistling Contest conducted at Mullaly Plgd.

10/17/38 - 813 - Amateur Photo Contest and Handcraft Exhibit at American
                 Museum of Natural History.

10/18/38 - 814 - Results of Municipal Golf Championship.

10/20/38 - 815 - Plaques installed as permanent records of awards made by
                 American Institute of Steel Construction. Story on Marine
                 Pkway. Bridge, Little Hell Gate Low Level Bridge and
                 Northern:Blvd., Bridge in Queens.

10/21/38 - 816 - Southbound roadway of Henry Hudson Pkway. from George
                 Washington Bridge to 79th St. closed for 1 week.

10/21/38 - 817 - Winners of Amateur Photo Contest.

10/21/38 - 818 - Finals of Roller Skating Contest at Circle Lawn, 106th St. &
                 Central Pk. West.

20/21/38 - 818A- Formation of playground bands and ochestras.

10/25/38 - 819 - 5th Annual Review of Civil Servicev Personnel.

10/26/38 - 819A- Chyrsanthemums bloom in Conservatory Garden.                 

11/4/38  - 820 - Annual chrysanthemum show at Prospect Park. 

11/7/38  - 821 - Final tournament for caddies at Mosholu Golf Course.

11/7/38  - 822 - Vanderbilt Gate to be installed at Conservatory Gardens at
                 104th St. & 5th Ave., Central Park. 

11/7/38  - 823 - Bids taken for first 3 contracts for construction of
                 Circumferential Pkway.- Bids in Shore Pkway. section.

11/9/38  - 824 - Bids taken for 4th contract on Circumferential Pkway.

11/10/38 - 825 - Finals of Whistling Contest at Mullaly Recreation Bldg.

ll/5/38  - 826 - Final tournament for caddies at Mosholu Golf Course. 

11/21/38 - 827 - Presentation of plan for Housing & Recreation. (Booklet)

11/21/38 - 827A- Work to be completed on Wantagh

11/26/38 - 828 - Closing of golf courses.

12/4/38  - 829 - Court of Appeals upholds Civil Service Commission in
                 requiring City's life guards to take practical tests.

12/6/38  - 830 - Ceremony to be held in connection with construction of
                 Circumferential Pkway. in Whitestone, Queens.

12/12/38 - 831 - 5th Contract on Circumferential Pkway.

12/13/38 - 832 - List of areas for ice skating, skiing and coasting.

12/18/38 - 833 - Ceremonies in connection with Christmas Trees.

12/16/38 - 834 - Contract for erection of Vanderbilt Gates in Central
                 Pk. awarded.

12/17/38 - 835 - Christmas Exhibit in Prospect Pk. Greenhouse.

12/20/38 - 836 - Bids received on 6th contract for Circumferential Pkway.

12/23/38 - 837 - Bids received on 7th contract on Circumferential Pkway.

12/23/38 - 838 - Bronx Playgrounds Operetta to give performances of "Pirates
                 of Penzance".

12/1938  - 833A- Progress of Park Dept. - 1934 - 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 1, 1938


               The Department of Parks announces that J. S.  (shipwreck)
Kelly, part owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers professional football teem, is
making a gift to the Central Park Zoo of a young chimpanzee.

               The animal is due to arrive in New York on the steamship
"Robin Gray" on July 5th.

                                    *****

July 1, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 2, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces the opening today of three
new playgrounds and one redesigned and enlarged playground.

                In Queens, at 14th Street south of 31st Avenue adjacent to
the Astoria Health Center, the new playground is equipped with swings,
see-saws, play houses, slide, sand pit and a portable shower. A brick comfort
station with facilities for boys and girls, and permanent concrete benches
are also provided.  The perimeter of the entire playground is landscaped with
shade trees.

                In Brooklyn, at New York and Clarkson Avenues, the new
playground has see-saws, slides, swings, a portable shower, a play house,
jungle gym and an open play area for group games» A brick building with
slate roof houses comfort facilities for boys and girls. Permanent concrete
benches and shade trees are included in the landscape scheme.

                At 23rd Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenues, the
playground has swings, see-saws, a slide, a sand table, a play house, a
portable shower and an open play area for group games. Here, also, permanent
concrete benches and shade trees are part of the landscape treatment.

                At Avenue P and East Fourth Street, this playground has been
redesigned and an additional area added.  The new facilities include
handball, shuffleboard, horseshoe pitching courts, a rectangular area,
encircled by a roller-skating track, which can be used for ice-skating in
winter and for basketball, volley ball, paddle tennis and soft ball during
the rost of the year, and permanent concrete benches and shade trees,, A
modern brick comfort station with facilities for boys and girls is included
in the design.

                These three playgrounds make a total of 261 which have been
added to the Park Department's recreational system since January 1934, The
total number available today is 369.

                The work was performed by the Works Progress Administration,
but planned and inspected by the Department of Parks.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 1, 1938


                The New York City Parkway Authority announces that wrecking
contractors are demolishing structures within the area of the proposed ocean
front parkway between Beach 73rd and Beach 109th Streets in Rockavay, along
the connections between the parkway and Beach Channel Drive, and within the
area of the approaches to the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge over Beach Channel.
Contracts were awarded by the New York City Parkway Authority to four
contractors on June 11, 1938. Considerable headway is being made and the
demolition will be completed on July 30, 1938, in time to allow construction
of the improvement to start with a minimum of delay.

                Of the approximately 500 structures to be demolished,-
bungalows and small structures of frame construction, old and undesirable,
form the major part. The amusement parks between Beach 96th and Beach 105th
Streets are also in the area to be cleared.

                The ocean front parkway will occupy a strip of land
approximately 200 feet wide on the north side of and adjoining the existing
boardwalk.  100 feet will be used for east and west traffic arteries and the
balance left for the protection of the boardwalk and the development of beach
game areas.  From the parkway, connections will be provided at Beach 73rd and
Beach 108th Streets to Beach Channel Drive and between Beach 94th and Beach
95th Streets to the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge. The area at the north approach
to the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge is being cleared of existing construction
under the present contracts.

                Cross Bay Parkway Bridge will connect the Rockaway Peninsula
with Cross Bay Boulevard adjacent to the existing bridge. Bids for the
construction of the Cross Bay Parkway Bridge have recently been opened and
the contract awarded.  The work will consist of repairing and changing the
existing viaduct and bascule bridge and providing a new viaduct, and bascule
bridge west of the existing structure.  The present bridge will be used for
northbound traffic, and the new viaduct and bascule bridge, of approximately
the same width as the existing structure; will be used for southbound
traffic, thus doubling the traffic capacity of the present bridge and
eliminating the bottleneck at the entrance to the Rockaways. Construction
contracts for grading and paving the parkway and the bridge approaches will
be advertised in a few weeks.  The entire project will be complete on June 1,
1939.

           The work of demolishing existing construction is being done under
four contracts at a total cost of $43,685.

           The improvements will not prevent bathing this summer and the
present Cross Bay Boulevard will not be closed to traffic at any time during
reconstruction.

July 1, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 1, 1938


        PARK DEPARTMENT FACILITIES FOR CHILDREN HIRING SUMMER MONTHS

             The Department of Parks announces that it has open for the use
of children who have been released from the dicipline of school, and who will
be marooned in the City during July & August 369 playgrounds and recreational
areas from 9 A.M. until 9 P.M.  These playgrounds are equipped with various
units of equipment and many of them have facilities for activities of all age
groups.

             The majority of these playgrounds accommodate not only children
of pre-school age but also the boy or girl up to 18 years of age.

             The swimming pools of the Park Department are open from 9:00
A.M. until 10 P.M. and during the morning, the swimming pools are free for
children under 14 years of age. In the afternoon, the children pay 10 cents
for admission.  The Department of Parks outdoor swimming pools are as
follows:

MANHATTAN Hamilton Fish Pool      East Houston & Sheriff Streets
          Colonial Pool           Bradhurst Avenue, W.145 to 147 Street
          Highbridge Pool         Amsterdam Avenue and 173 Street
          Thomas Jefferson Pool   111 to 114 Streets and First Avenue

BROOKLYN  Sunset Pool             7th Avenue and 43 Street
          McCarren Pool           Nassau Avenue and Lorimer Street
          Red Hook Pool           Clinton, Bay and Henry Streets
          Betsy Head              Hopkinson, Dumont and Livonia Streets

BRONX     Crotona Pool            173 Street and Fulton Avenue

QUEENS    Astoria Pool            Barclay Street and 24th Drive

RICHMOND  Faber Pool              Faber Street between Richmond Terrace
                                     and Kill Van Kull
          Tompkinsville Pool      Arrietta Street at Pier #6

                       Indoor swimming pools under the jursidiction of the
Department of Parks are free to children from 9 A.M. until 6 P.M. daily and
are located as follows:

MANHATTAN 35 West 134th Street, Manhattan
          Clarkson and 7th Avenue, Manhattan
          5 Rutgers Place, Manhattan
          342 East 54th Street, Manhattan
          409 West 28th Street, Manhattan

BROOKLYN  Metropolitan and Bedford Avenues, Brooklyn

    During the summer months, the Eark Department will sponsor an extended
summer program and promote many tournaments and activities for children
including a softball tournament, volley ball tournament, checker tournament,
chess tournament, paddle tennis tournament, jacks contest, punchball for
girls, and a ping-pong tournament for boys and girls.

     Other facilities in playgrounds include handball courts, basketball
courts and wading poolsc    There is a wading pool or a shower located in
all of the playgrounds under the jurisdiction of the i?ark Department.
These wading pools attract thousands of children during the summer months
and provide healthful;, refreshing, recreational activity for children
from three to nine years of age.

     Handcraft activities are ar-anged for, n.t locations where there are
field houses. Other activities include folk dancing, dramatics and glee
clubs.

         Parents are urged to send their children to the recreational facili-
ties of the Department of Parks, staffed by trained supervisors during the
summer months.  There they will be free from the risk of various hazards
accompanying play in streets.

July 1st, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 5, 1938


          The entourage of the Crown Prince of Sweden will take occasion on
Tuesday, July 5th to make a sight-seeing trip by motor.

          At 9:20 A.M. the party, which is staying at the Hotel Barclay, will
be met by the members of the Mayor's Swedish Reception Committee and will be
escorted to a fleet of thirty automobiles, twelve of which, will be City
owned cars and the balance loaned for the occasion by the Mayor's Committee.

            The trip will get under way at 10 o'clock and will proceed
directly crosstown, to the West Side Highway and go up along thy Henry Hudson
Parkway to Fort Tryon Park where a brief stop will be made for the
magnificent Hudson River view. Returning south along the Henry Hudson
Parkway, the party will motor across the George Washington Bridge to the New
Jersey entrance plaza where it will turn around and return to New York.  The
route then continues alovn Fort Washington Avenue past the Presbyterian
Hospital so that the party can get a glimpse of the temporary resting place
of the Crown Prince. From this point on the itinerary proceeds via Broadway,
155th Street and Seventh Avenue to 134th Street and the Triborough Bridge.
The Randall's Island Stadium will be viewed from the Bridge end the party
will then proceed to the Astoria Pool on the Queens side where they will view
the free children's swimming period.  Returning to the cars, the route will
be along the Grand Central Parkway and Northern State Parkway to Jones Beach.

          State troopers will pick up the escort detail at the city line,
relieving the twelve New York City motorcycle patrolmen.  At Jonas Beach the
visitors will see a pool show at the West Bath House and will than proceed to
the Boardwalk Cafe where a buffet luncheon will be served at 12:45. Mr.
Herbert Bayard Swope, of the Long Island State Park Commission, will act as
host at the luncheon.

          At two o'clock the party will resume the motor trip, proceeding
directly to the World's Fair where a fifteen minute motor tour of the grounds
is scheduled. At 3:45 the motor trip will be terminated at Radio City, where
the visitors will be taken backstage to watch the Rockettes in action.

          The trip will be under the joint auspices of the New York City Park
Department and the Long Island State Park Commission, Mr. Arthur E. Rowland,
Chief Engineer of the latter Commission, will take care of the details after
the party has crossed the city line on its way to Jones Beach, while Allyn
R. Jennings, General Superintendent of the City Park Department is in charge
of the balance of the trip.

          In addition to the Mayor's Swedish Welcoming Committee, the
following members of the Swedish Delegation will make the trip:

          Mr. August Savstrom, Speaker of the Second Chamber of the
Riksdag; Mrs. Savstrom and son

          Mr. Karl Schlyter, President of the Court of Appeals for Skane
   and Blekinge, former Minister of Justice; ai:d Mrs. Schlytur

          Mr. Herman Eriksson, Presidont of the Royal Board of Trade; and
   Mrs. Eriksson

          Mr. Bernhard Eriksson, Governor of Province, former Minister
   of the Navy

          Mr. Sigurd Cunuan, Ph.D., Custodian of the Antiquities of the
   Realm

          The Right Reverend Edvard Rodhe, D. T., Bishop of Lund; and Mrs.
   Rodhe

          The Right Reverend Gustaf Karl Ljunggren, D. T., Bishop of Skara;
   and Mrs. Ljunggren

          Mr. Osten Unden, LL.D., Chancellor for the Universities, former
   Minister for Foreign Affairs

          Mrs. Hanna Rydh, Ph.D., Archeologist

          Mr. Sigfrid Hanssons Ph. D., President of the Royal Social Board

          Mr. Emit Bail Lundmark, Ph. D,, Professor of Astronomy

          Mr. Yngvo Hugo, Lecturer; and Mrs. Hugo

          Mr. Johan Johansson, Chairman of the City Council of Stockholm;
       and Mrs. Johansson

          Lieutenant General G, R. J. Akermanj Vice Chairman of the City
       Council of Stockholm; and Mrs. Akonaan

          Mr. Gunnar Fant, Mayor of Stockholm

          Mr. Ernst Birger Jungen, Chairman of the City Council of
       Goteborg; and Mrs. Jungen

          Miss Karstin Hesselgren, Member of the Second Chamber of the
       Riksdag

          Mr. Oscar Falkman, Civil Engineer, Prosident of the Boliden
       Mining Corporation; and Mrs. Falkman

          Miss Inga Falkman

          Mr. Bo von Stockenstrom, former Minister of Agriculture

          Mr. Albin Johansson, President of the Kooperativa Forbundet
                                                  (Cooperative Union)

          Mr. Axel Gjores, Editor, Member of the Board of Directors of the
       Cooperative Union

          Mr. Ovo Olsson

          Commander Sten Dehlgren, Editor of Dagens Nyhetor, Chairman of
       the Editors' Club; and Mrs. Dehlgren

          Mr. Vilhelm Lundstrom, Professor, Chairman of the Executive
       Committee

          Mr. C. A. Sawenberg, representing The Methodist Church

          Mr. Sigfrid Edstron, Chairman of The Royal Swedish New Sweden
       Commission; and Mrs. Edstrcm

          Count Folke Bernadotte af Wisborg, Vice Chairman of The Royal
       Swedish New Sweden Commission

          Mrs., Rickard Sandier, Wife of the Minister for Foreign Affairs

          Major Herbert Jacobsson; and Mrs. Jacobsson

          Mr. Olof Lamm, former Consul General at New York; and Mrs. Lamm.

          Mr. Joseph Sachs, Vice Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce of
       Stockholm

          Dr. and Mrs. I. Coblijn

          Mrs. Edstrom-Nystromer

          Miss Kerstin Johansson

          Miss Ulla Johansson

          Mr. Gustaf Gegor

          Mr. Eric Scharping

          Mr. Thorsten Hanson

          Mr. Stollan Wulff

          Mr. Erik Wijk

          Mr. and Mrs. Arvid Oborg


                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 8, 1938


          The Department of Parks announces that a two and one half mile
section of Long Island Motor Parkway extending from Horace Harding Boulevard
to Alley Pond Park, will be opened on Saturday, July 9, at 11 A. M., for the
exclusive use of bicyclists.

          Commissioner of Parks Robert Moses, Mrs. Charles B. Williams,
Councilman James A. Burke and Mr. Otto Eisele, President of the Amateur
Bicyclists of America, will participate in official ceremonies at the
intersection of the Parkway and Horace Harding Boulevard. Following the
speaking, from 300 to 500 bike riders will take part in a parade over the
Parkway.

          The Department of Parks fifty piece band, a parade of old bikes and
trick bicycle riding will also be included in the program. For the past two
weeks the Department of Parks has been working to prepare the road for
cyclists. Guard rails have been installed, directional signs erected and
approaches constructed. A ticycle concession operated by Ted Peckham has been
established at the Alley Pond Field House where besides facilities for hiring
out bicycles, instructions in riding, repairing of bicycles, sales of cycles
and accessories, storage of bicycles and checking of personal property, there
is an adjacent parking area for those arriving in automobiles. Bicycles may
be hired for 35¢ per hour with a $2.00 deposit; storage will be $2.00 per
month for each bicycle; instructions will be made at the rate of $1.00 per
hour for each person and clothing will be checked for ten cents per person.

          The path will be open every day from 8 A.M. until dark. It will be
operated by uniformed park attendants and patrolled by mounted police.

          The outmoded Motor Parkway which winds for more than fifty miles
from Horace Harding Boulevard to Lake Ronkonkoma, was given last Fall by
William K.  Vanderbilt to the Department of Parks, the Long Island State Park
Commission, the State Department of Public Works and the Highway Department
of Nassau and Suffolk counties. It was built as a sportsman's enterprise in
the early automobile days.  In 1908, 1909 and 1910, the Vanderbilt Cup Auto
Races were held over the Parkway.  After the World War it was open as a toll
road but in recent years could not compete with the Parkway system.

          Every Sunday at 10:30 A.M., the All American Bus Lines will run
buses to the bicycle path from 246 West 42nd Street, New York City.

                                  # # # # #

JULY 8, 1938.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 8, 1938

           The Departaent of Parks announces that yesterday it received as a
gift froa Mr. Louis Kasia, an importer, one white, (albino) turtle.

           This rare specimen it being identified and classified today by the
Authorities at the Museum of Natural History and photographs of it may be
taken at the Central Park Zoo starting Saturday, July 9.

                                   ######

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 8, 1938



                       TOURNAMENTS TO BE CONDUCTED IN
                     PARK DEPARTMENT PLAYGROUNDS DURING
                          MONTHS OF JULY AND AUGUST


        The Department of Parks announces that a variety of tournaments of both
the active and passive types of recreation will be conducted for boys and
girls of Park Department playgrounds during the months of July and August.

         Experience has demonstrated that many children are not physically
capable of bearing the heat and burden of active games during warm weather,
and the children who do participate in active recreation of one sort or
another welcome the transition to a state of relaxation and intellectual
stimulus provided by quiet games such as checkers> chess and jacks in the
quietude and coolness of a shady corner in the playground.

        Any boy or girl who has not reached his 16th birthday is eligible to
compete in the Checker Tournament which will commence in all Park Department
playgrounds on Monday, July llth.  Each borough will conduct its own finals
to select the two best players (either girls or boys) to represent the
borough in the city-wide finals which will take place at Heckscher
Playground, Central Park, July 21st at 2 P.M.

        A Chess Tournament will be held in all Park Playgrounds on Monday,
July 11th for hoys 14 to 17 years of age.  Borough eliminations will take
place within a short time thereafter to determine the player who is most
conversant with the intricate moves and strategic manouvering of 'pieces' to
represent the borough in the city championship tourney, which will take place
at Heckscher Playground, Central Park, July 21st at 2 P.M.

        Gold and silver medals will be awarded to the first and second place
dinners of the City Finals in both the Checker and Chess Tournaments.  Bronze
medals will be awarded to the borough finalists.

         A contest in "Jacks", the game that is popular with every girl, will
take place in Park Department Playgrounds beginning the first week in August.
Girls 15 years of age and under are eligible to enter the contest. The City
Finals, at which the 2 best girls from each of the 5 boroughs will compete
for the City Championship, will be held at Heckscher Playground, Central
Park, August 25th at 2 P.M.

         Gold, Silver and Bronze medals will be awarded to the 1st, 2nd, and
3rd place winners in the city finals.

In the active game classification, the following tournaments will take place
as follows;

Activity            Age__Grcmp

Paddle Tennis   Boys & Girls 13 to 15 years       July 27     Roosevelt Plgd.,
                  Singles & Doubles                                Manhattan

                Boys & Girls 14 to 17 years
                  Singles & Doubles

                A singles player cannot be a
                member of doubles team,

Ping Pong       Boys & Girls 10 to 14 years      August 9     Heckscher Plgd,
                Boys & Girl a 14. to 17 years                     Central Park

Baseball        Boys - 16 years of age & unde:   August 16    North Meadow,
                                                                   Central Park

Punch Ball      Girls- 16 years of age & under   August 22    Heckscher Plgd.,
                                                                   Central Park


        Gold, Silver, and Bronxe medals will be awarded to the 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd place winners in the city finals of each of the above tournaments.

        Any boy or girl who is interested in entering the tournaments,
whether they are of the active or passive game type, is requested to apply to
the playground director in charge of the Park Department playground nearest
his home.  Early registration is important because unless a contestant
participates in the preliminary stages of elimination for each tournament, he
is ineligible to represent his borough in the city finals.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 7, 1938


                              COMMUNITY SINGING
                           WASHINGTON SQUARE PARK


     The Department of Parks announces that community singing will be
inaugurated at Washington Square Park, Sunday, July 10, at 4 P.M.  This
venture into outdoor community singing is sponsored by the "Villager League
of Friendship" and will be an enjoyable and popular resumption of the
successful series of indoor singings conducted during the winter seasons, and
on one occasion in the park.

    Mr. Allen Henckley, formerly with "The Bostonians", the Metropolitan
Opera Company and director of the Village Light Opera Group, has consented to
lead the singing.  He will be assisted at each of these gatherings by
Mrs. Ivor Inness, who is well known professionally as Gertrude Rutchinson,
former radio accompanist and guest artist.

     Arrangements have been made to bring the Harmony Trumpeters, directed by
Harman R. Clark, as guest artists for the early programs.

     Community singing kas proved to be a source of such great joy and gaiety
that the Washington Square gatherings will continue throughout the summer
season.

     The program has been prepared with painstaking care so that the fullest
measure of delight and satisfaction will be insured.  Arrangements for the
appearance of guest artists of well known reputation will be made from time
to time.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 12, 1938


     The Department of Parks announces that another new baseball diamond at
Randall's Island will be opened for play starting July 15, 1938. This will be
the third diamond to be completed here.

     Baseball is another facility to be added to the vast recreation center
which has superseded the former House of Refuge at Randall's Island.

     When the project is completed there will be besides the Stadium which
has been used for track and field events, - soccer, football, rugby, concerts
and operettas, a fully equipped children's playground, basketball and
shuffleboard courts, 8 baseball diamonds and 27 tennis courts, 25 of which
will be clay and 2 turf surfaced.  The 2 turf courts will be used for
exhibition games.

                                    # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 13, 1938


                         INSTALLATION OF AN EIGHT FOOT CHAIN
                         LINK FENCE ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY
                         OF FLUSHING MEADOW PARK.


                  The Department of Parks announces that bids were opened on
July 11th for the installation of approximately 11,700 linear feet of an
eight foot high chain link fence along the westerly boundary of Flushing
Meadow Park.

                  This fence will be installed in the park on the east side
of the west service road, and will completely protect the westerly side of
the park from Northern Boulevard to Union Turnpike.

                  The three lowest bidders were:

1.    Ross Galvanizing Works, Brooklyn, N. Y.          $16,357.40

2.    American Chain and. Cable Company                 17,516.00

3.    Wickwire Spencer Steel Company                    17,491.50
      41 East 42 Street
      New York City

                  The work will be completed by October 1st, 1938.

                                   # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 13, 1938


           The Department of Parks announces that community singing will be
conducted in a number of different locations throughout the City.  The
singing at Washington Square Park on Sunday afternoon, July 10th, was so
successful that it was decided to extend this activity to all boroughs.

         Community singing, conducted under the auspices of the Department of
Parks will start on Sunday, July 17th at 3:30 P.M., and continue on Sundays
at the same time, at the following locations:

MANHATTAN   -   The Mall, Central Park, 7?nd Street

QUEENS      - Music Grove, Forest Park, Myrtle
              Avenue and Union Turnpike

BRONX       - Poe Park, Grand Concourse and 192 Street

         On July 23, at the Music Grove, Prospect Park, Brooklyn, and on July
24, at Wolfe's Pond Park, Richmond, this community singing will start at 3:30
P.s4. and continue on Saturdays in Brooklyn and on Sundays in Richmond for
the duration of the summer season, at the same hour.

                                  # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 13, 1938


                   The Long Island State Park Commission and the Department
of Parks of the City of New York announce that with the termination of the
present week's productions of operettas on Saturday, July 16, at the Marine
Stadium at Jones Beach State Park and on Sunday, July 17, at Randall's
Island, these enterprises will be discontinued for the balance of the season.

                  Discontinuance of these performances was made necessary
because of the serious difficulties which the producers, Messrs. Shubert and
Gallo, have had with the various theatrical Unions coupled with the bad
weather in the early part of the season and the consequent falling off of
attendance under that of previous years.

                 At Jones Beach on Wednesday and Saturday evenings there will
be special fireworks and swimming and diving shows in place of the operettas,
and the use of the Marine Stadium for other events on other evenings is being
studied by the Commission, The Stadium will continue to be used for water
events in the daytime.

                 At Randall's Island, there will be baseball Sunday
afternoons in the Stadium starting July 24 and continuing through September;
and other events will be arranged for evenings. The next afternoon event will
be the Hibernian Track Meet next Sunday afternoon.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 13, 1938


                            PHOTOGRAPHIC CONTEST


                 The Department of Parks announces that an amateur
photographic contest, depicting "Youth and Age in our City Parks and
Playgrounds", will take place in all the parks and park playgrounds of New
York City.

                 This will be the first time a photographic contest has been
held by the Department of Parks. The recreational supervisors have reported
that there is considerable interest in photography by persons of all ages;
and in some ox the boroughs, camera clubs have been organised by the
playground directors.

                 The Park Association of New York City will sponsor this
contest in cooperation with the Department of Parks. The rules governing the
conduct of the contest are as follows:

                 1.   To be eligible, all pictures must have been taken
during 1958, before September 10th, in parks, parkways, pools, beaches
or playgrounds under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks.

                 2.   Pictures must be at least 2¼ x 2¼ and the print
must be a glossy print.

                 5.   The name and address of the amateur photographer should
be clearly written on the reverse side of each picture.

                 4.   The decisions of the judges will be final in all cases.

                 5.   The Department of Parks reserves the right to reproduce
any picture submitted, for park purposes. 

                 6.   Negatives must be submitted.

                 7.   Contest closes September 10, 1958.

                 8.   Contest is open to persons of all ages.

                 9.  Contestants may submit not more than five different
pictures in this contest, depicting activities of either one or both of the
following classes:

                 "Youth and Age in our City Parks and Playgrounds"

                      Class "A": Spring and Summer Activities.

                      Class "B": Fall and Winter Activities.


               Appropriate prizes will be awarded to the contestants who
submit the four beat pictures, after they have complied with all rules and
regulations and any further conditions designated by the judges.  No
contestant can win more than one prize. The prizes have been donated by The
Park Association of New York City, R. H. Macy & Company, Davega City Radio,
Inc., and Willoughby's. Fifth and sixth prizes will consist of certificates
of merit from the Department of Parks.

              The following persons have been invited to act as judges of
the contests:


              HONORARY CHAIRMAN - Mrs. Arthur Hayes Sulzberger,
                                  President of Park Association

                                  Paul. J. Woolf
                                  John Gass
                                  Gamuel Gottscho

Contestants should submit the pictures to the Borough Directors
              of their respective boroughs at the following addresses:


              MANHATTAN  - Mr. Kenneth S. Franklin, Arsenal Building,
                           Central Park, 64 Street & Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C.

              BROOKLYN   - Mr. Richard C. Jenkins, Litchfield Mansion,
                           5th St. and Prospect Park West, Bklyn., N.Y.

              QUEENS     - Mr. Philip J. Cruise, Overlook, Forest Park,
                           Kew Gardens, Long Island, N. Y.

              BRONX      - Mr. George L. Quigley, East Bronx and Birchall
                           Avenue, The Bronx.

              RICHMOND   - Mr. James J. Mallen, Clove Lakes, New Brighton,
                           Staten Island, N. Y.


                                  # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 13, 1938


                           REPAVING OF GRAND CENTRAL PARKWAY
                           EXTENSION BETWEEN ST. MICHAEL'S
                           CEMETERY AND UHION TURNPIKE.


                 The Department of Parks announces that bids were opened on
July 11, for the repaving of Grand Central Parkway Extension between
St. Michael's Cemetery and Union Turnpike.  This work is divided into two
sections.  The northerly section of the parkway from Northern Boulevard to
St. Michael's Cemetery, which is approximately 2.4 miles in length, will be
repaved with cement concrete pavement and will consist of two thirty-three
foot pavements separated by a ten foot grass island.  In general, the grades
will approximately coincide with the grades of the existing bituminous
macadam pavement.

                 The southerly section of the parkway from Horace Harding
Boulevard to Union Turnpike, which is approximately 1.3 miles in length will
be widened with a bituminous macadam pavement similar to the existing
pavement about thirteen feet along the easterly side. The existing bituminous
macadam pavement will be brought to the new grades required in the ultimate
development of Flushing Meadow Park. Here, the new parkway will consist of a
twenty-two foot eastbound and a twenty-four foot westbound roadways separated
by a nine foot island.

                 A parkway lighting system will be installed in the grass
island and a strip ten feet in width along the easterly boundary of the new
parkway will be topooiled in the southerly section.

                 The three lowest bidders were:

1.    Tuckahoe Construction Co., Tuckahoe, N. Y.                $539,620.00

2.    B.Turecamo Contracting Co., Brooklyn, N.Y.                 546,555.80

3.    Rusciano & Son Corp., 728 E. 212 St., N.Y.C.
                 (Alternate "A")                                 555,184.00
                 (Alternate "B")                                 551,866.50
                 The work will be completed in January, 1339.

                                 # # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 24, 1938


          The Department of Parks announces that due to the tremendous play
on the municipal golf courses, which to date is 15% overr last year and 30%
over 1935, it will he necessary to close the courses in Queens and Tlie Bronx
one day each weak duirng July and August to give them a rest.  The greens
will be spiked and top-dressed to prevent them from becoming worn out, and
many temporary greens will be installed, as there has been heavy damage from,
the continuous rains.

          Following is a schedule showing the days which the various courses
will be closed:

                   Kissena        -    Monday
                   Pelham         -    Monday

                   Clearview      -    Tuesday
                   Mosholu        -    Tuesday

                   Forest Park    -    Wednesday
                   Split Rock     -    Wednesday

                   Van Cortlandt  -    Thursday

          The play on the two courses in Staten Island is not as heavy as it
is on the other city courses, so neither of them will be closed; and as it is
the only golf course in Brooklyn, Dyker. Beach will not be closed unless it
is found to be impossible to keep it in satisfactory condition.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 27, 1938


                 RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES PROVIDED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF
                 PARKS FOR PERSONS OVER 50 YEARS OF AGE INCLUDING CHECKER
                 AND CHESS TOURNAMENTS DURING AUGUST.


             The Department of Parks announces that checker and chess
tournaments will be conducted during the month of August for men and women
who have passed the first half century mark of life.

             The recreational facilities provided by the Department of Parks
and the comprehensive program of recreational activities have afforded these
older folks ample opportunity for indulgence in that sport or activity which
is most conducive to their enjoyment.

             Besides some of the passive activities such as concerts,
dramatics and the various playground contests, tournaments and athletic
events at which the older folks attend in great numbers, there are activities
in which they actively participate such as horseshoe pitching, shuffleboard,
golf, croquet, lawn bowling, model yacht sailing, boating, swimming, fishing,
hiking and social dancing.

             Special programs have been prepared for the purpose of
attracting persons of advanced years. In the past, numberous groups of men
about 50 years of age from various sections of the city and nearby towns in
Westchester, Long Island and New Jersey responded to the call of the Park
Department for entrants in the now celebrated "Barbershop Quartet Contest"
and "Hill Billy Contest", both of which contests will be held again this
year.

             Constantly exploring new fields for potential sources of
recreational adventure and ever alert to experiment with fun, the Department
of Parks has inaugurated an amateur photographic contest depicting "Youth and
Age in our City Parks and Playgrounds".  This contest is open to persons of
all ages and will close on September 10th.

             Close observation of Park Department playgrounds, particularly
during the warm days of summer, will reveal large groups of men and women,
comfortably seated under the shade of trees, engaged in checker and chess
competition. It was decided that the city champion of checker and chess in
Park playgrounds among these who profess to be at least two score and ten
should no longer be left to conjecture. Therefore, checker and chess
tournaments will be held the latter part of August to determine the
respective champions of that age group.

             America's Good Will Union and other Civic Organizations have
indicated their willingness to cooperate with the Department of Parks in
conducting the checker and chess tournaments for persons over 50 years of age
by obtaining entrants from various homes where the folks pass leisure moments
in playing these games.

             Upon completion of the checker and chess tournaments for both
the young and older age groups, it is planned to have the champion of each
group play each other for the championship of all ages.  This contest will
present an excellent opportunity for the amateur photographers who intend to
enter the Park Department photographic contest depicting "Youth and Age" to
get a beautiful picture of youth and age competing in the age old games of
chess and checkers.

             The eliminations of the checker and chess tournaments for men
and women over 50 years of age will take place on Monday, August 22nd, at 2
P.M. at the following locations in the various boroughs:

          BROOKLYN -   Concert Grove, Prospect Park -
                         Entrance at Flatbush Avenue and Empire Boulevard.

          MANHATTAN -  Heckscher Playground, Central Park -
                        Entrance at 64th Street and Fifth Avenue.

          QUEENS -     Greenhouse Playground* Forest Park -
                         Entrance at Woodhaven Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue.

          BRONX -      Poe Park - East 192nd Street, Grand Concourse and
                         Kingsbridge Road.

          RICHMOND -   McDonald Playground - Forest and Myrtle Avenues.

          The finals will be held at Heckscher Playground, Central Park,
Wednesday, August 31st, at 2 P.M.

          Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd
place in the finals.

          Men and women over 50 years of age who are desirous of competing in
either the checker or chess tournaments are requested to apply to the
Playground Director in charge of the playground nearest his
home. Participation in the eliminations is essential before one is eligible
to enter the finals.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 27, 1938


                 It has been brought to the attention of the Department of
Parks that in past years, life guards along Rockaway Beach have solicited
funds from cottage holders and other-summer tenants, for a Life Guards' Ball.
In some cases cottage tenants report that they have even been threatened
unless they contributed.

                 All residents of the Rockawuys are informed that such
solicitation of funds by an employee of the Park Department for any purpose
whatsoever, is prohibited. The Department will appreciate receiving
information on any activity of this kind.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 27, 1938


                    PLAYGROUND CHILDREN'S DANCE FESTIVAL


           The Department of Parks announces that the girls of Park Department
playgrounds in the Borough of Brooklyn are attending regular practice sessions
in preparation for the Annual Dance Festival, which will take place on the
Long Meadow, Prospect Park, Saturday, August 20, at 2:30 P. M.

           This Dance Festival is one of the outstanding features of the
recreational program prepared for the children of Brooklyn's
playgrounds. Thousands of spectators attend the dancing exhibition annually
and such a high standard of terpsichorean ability has been established that
the girls are eager to perpetuate the enviable reputation attained in past
performances.

           In addition to learning the steps of various dances, the children
are taught how to make the costumes which they wear for the dances. These
costumes play an important part in the estimate of the judges when they come
to determine the three best dancing groups. Therefore, each dancer will
devote a great deal of time and effort to the making of costumes since the
appearance of the costume will add to or detract from the dancing
performance.

           The Dance Festival will consist of eight dances with approximately
100 children participating in each dance. Each dancer is a registered member
of one of the Park Department playgrounds in the Borough of Brooklyn.

           Plaques will be awarded to the three best dancing groups.

           The dances which will be given and the sections of Brooklyn
represented by the dancers are as follows:

                 Mame of Dance                Section Represented

     Little Dutch Mill                        Coney Island
     English Reel In Swing Time               Red Hook and Carroll Park
     Snow White and the Dwarfs                Borough Hall
     Robin Hood                               Bushwick
     Minuet                                   Willismsburg and Greenpoint
     Military Tap                             Brownsville
     Where Has My Little Dog Gone             Flatbush and Sheepshead Bay
     In a Persian Market                      Bay Ridge and Gravesend

             Girls under sixteen years of age who are desirous of
participating in the Dance Festival are requested to communicate with the
Playground Director in charge of the Park Department playground nearest her
home. Early registration is advisable in order that as much time as possible
may be devoted to the mastery of the intricate steps at the various
instruction classes which are in progress at the present time.

                                 **********

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 28, 1938


                           ST. MARY'S PARK - BRONX


             The Department of Parks will take bids on August 12th, 1938,
for the reconstruction of St. Mary's Park, Bronx, for which the Board
of Estimate appropriated $138,000. today.

             The work will consist of a development of the east section of
the park as a large recreational area. The development will contain two full
size baseball diamonds, a new children's playground, and the existing tennis
courts will be improved. Several new horseshoe pitching courts will also be
constructed. A broad tree-shaded mall will extend north and south from
St. Mary's Street to Trinity Avenue. Walks in the old section of the park
will be realigned, resurfaced, and a new comfort station constructed.

             The present recreational facilities in this park are entirely
inadequate and baseball has been played on a rough unfinished diamond.  The
new diamonds will be two of the best in the entire city.  The field will be
laid out so that football may be played in season.

             The money for the construction of this improvement was obtained
by an arrangement with the Department of Education whereby certain lands in
Macombs Dam Park were transferred to that department by the Department of
Parks.

                                 -   END   -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                               July 28, 1938


             As a sequel to the Park Department's Traveling Farm Yard which
has completed its tour of the city playgrounds, a seven ton trellised
trailer, seventeen feet long and seven feet wide, has been arranged and
labeled by the Park Department with tiers of flowers, interesting plants,
garden implenents and other reminders of life in the country.

             This "Bit of Country" on wheels will begin its tour of the city
playgrounds on Monday, August 1st., at 10:00 A.M. and will make its first
stop at Roosevelt Playground, Forsythe and Stanton Streets.

             The trailer has a platform with steps on each side from which
the horticultural exhibit may be viewed.  Petunias, marigolds, zinnias,
fuchsias and other new and old fashioned flowers will lend color to the more
sombre plants of mint, thyme, sage, cotton, sweet potato, tobacco, etc.,
corn, tomatoes and peanuts have been grown in pots and will also be
displayed.

             A plant of Poison Ivy in a special glass case, and two varieties
of Rag Weed, will be exhibited with timely suggestions for their avoidance.

             The rear end of the trailer will have a model window box and a
display of garden implements.  In addition there will be an exhibit of
beneficial and destructive insect life.  A Weather Vane on the top of the
trailer will complete the rural picture.

             Attendants will accompany the exhibit to answer questions and
explain the names and uses of the various plants, flowers and other parts of
the exhibit; which might be of only passing interest to country youngsters,
but puzzling and entertaining to those who spend their vacation on the city
streets.

             The list of Playgrounds and the dates on which the exhibit will
be shown is as follows:

                                  MANHATTAN

August    1st, 2nd         Roosevelt Playground       Forsythe & Stanton Sts.
  "       3rd, 4th         Corlears Hook Playground   Jackson & Cherry Sts.
  "       5th, 6th, 7th    Tompkins Playground        East 10th St., Ave. A
  "       8th, 9th         Seward Playground          E. B'way, & Hester St.
  "      10th, 11th        John Jay Playground        E. River & 76th St.
  "      12th, 13th, 14th  Washington Sq. Playground  Washington Square

                                    BRONX

August 15th, 16th          Crotona Playground         Charlotte St,
                                                          Crotona Park E.
  "    17th, 18th          St. James Playground       E. 192nd St., Jerome Ave.
  "    19th, 20th, 21st    St. Mary's Playground      Trinity Avc., 147th St.

                                  BROOKLYN
                                      
August 22nd, 23rd          McCarron Playground        Lorimer & Bayard Sts.
  "    24th, 25th, 26th    Lindsay Playground         Boroum & Leonard Sts.
  "    27th, 28th          Pitkin Ave & New Jersey Av
  "    29th, 30th          Lincoln Terrace            Eastern P'kway,
                                                         Lincoln Terr.
  "   31st, Sept. 1,2nd    Red Hook Park              Pioneer & Richard Sts.


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                             August 4, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that the new Municipal
Floating fresh water Baths anchored at 96 Street and the Hudson River, will
open on August 5, at 10 A.M., without ceremonies.

              The three barges that make up this bathing unit are part of
six, all in various stages of disrepair, which, under the provision of the
new City Charter, were inherited from the Borough President of Manhattan by
the Park Department earlier this year, and comprises the only units that were
found to be worth salvaging.

              The Park Department went to work immediately to transfer these
forty-nine year old barges into modern miniature Lidos with nautical
railings, ladders and awnings.  Super-structure and locker rooms were
removed, new floorings installed and the barges otherwise altered so that
they could be placed in operation to provide relief from discomfort during
the hot days of this summer for West Side residents.

              Each of the three barges measures 62' x 92', and the two to be
used for bathing will have closed tanks 40' x 68', which will be 4' 6" deep.
The third barge whioh will serve as the locker house will have dressing,
checking, shower and toilet facilities, as well as a first-aid station.

              Men, women and children will be permitted to use the facility
at the same time with separate tanks for children and adults. A basket system
for checking wearing apparel similar to that used at the twelve Park
Department outdoor swimming pools will be installed to provide a greater use
of dressing facilities.

              This new facility will be open during daylight hours and
operated in the same manner and at the same rates as the outdoor swimming
pools have been for the past two years, which provide that children under 14
years of age can swim free on weekdays from 10 A.M.  to 1 P.M.  After 1
P.M. on weekdays and all day on Saturday, Sunday and holidays, there is a ten
cents charge for children under 14 years of ago and a twenty cents charge for
all others.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 10, 1938


                    Commissioner Moses announced today that a ceremony will
be held at the City Hall Post Office Monday afternoon, August 15 at 4:00
P.M. in connection with the start of demolition of the old Post Office. Mayor
LaGuardia will officiate at the ceremony.

                     This eyesore is to be removed after months of
negotiating with federal authorities for its transfer to the city.  The
city's bid of $1.00 for the structure was finally accepted and bonds approved
by the Procurement Division of the Treasury Department. The contract has been
let to the John J. Abramsen Company, Inc. They will be paid $63,400 for their
work on this structure.

                                   # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 11, 1938


               For the past few weeks, life guards at the beaches under the
jurisdiction of the Department of Parks have been practicing daily for a life
guard meet to be hold at Jacob Riis Park Wednesday afternoon, August 24th, On
Friday, August 12th, eliminations will be held among the life guards at each
beach to determine the make-up of the toams which will represent their
respective beaches in the tournament at Jacob Riis Park.

               There have been seven events scheduled to determine the beach
championship and the individual life guard championship. Each beach is
limited to an eight man team with the two best life guards from each beach
competing for the individual championship.

               Events will consist of boat rescues, rescues with and without
equipment for both team and individual. The team scoring the most points will
be awarded with a trophy emblematic of the championship, which will remain in
its possession for one year.  The beach receiving this for three years, will
retain permanent possession of the trophy.  There will be a trophy awarded to
the individual life guard Champion who scores the most points in the
meet. Medals will be awarded to those men who finish first, second and third
in each event.

                                  # # # # #

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                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                                                      WILLIAM R. C. WOOD
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                                                      JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                       
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         


MEMORANDUM TO THE PRESS:



              As the result of reported inquiries raid numerous complaints
with reference to closed school recreational facilities mistakenly addressed
to the Park Department, I am attaching a memorandum which reiterates my
position as to lack of cooperation by the Board of Education in recreation
matters.

              This situation has not appreciably improved In the last four
years.

                                        (Robert Moses signature)
                                        ROBERT MOSES

August 15, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 15, 1938

                        STATMENT OF PARK COMMISSIONER

                                     ON

                 BOARD OF EDUCATION RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
               NOW SHUT UP, WHICH SHOULD BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
            AND ON LACK OF COORDINATION WITH THE PARK DEPARTMENT.


1. Official Board of Education Playgrounds operate only four hours on
   week days, from 1:30 P.M. to 5:30 P.M.   Playgrounds should be operated
   from 10 A.M. until dark.

2. 10 closed School Playgrounds should be open. (See list A attached.)

3, Board of Education Playgrounds are closed on Saturdays and Sundays
   during the entire summer.

4. All High School Athletic Fields are closed on Saturdays and Sundays,
   with the exception of Curtis High School Athletic Field in Richmond.

5. Seward High School Athletic Field located at Hester and Essex Streets,
   Manhattan, is closed all week; this field is in great demand and should
   be open all week.

6. All Board of Education Swirming Pools are closed on Saturdays and Sundays.
   20 swimming pools, not in close proximity to Park Department Swimning
   Pools or Boaches, should be open on Saturdays and Sundays.  (See list "B"
   attachod.)

7. Teachers of Health Education in high schools receive two months summer
   vacation. Swimming teachers of the Board of Education, many of whom are
   assigned to supervise shower baths during the school year, likewise
   receive two months vacation during the summer months. Those swimming
   teachors were placed on a permanent schedule last year and should work
   during the summer vhon they are most needed.

8. There are 118 evening recreation centers open from October to May,
   from 7:30 P.M, to 10:00 P.M., and some only 2 or 3 nights a week.  At
   least 200 additional evening recreation centers should be open; and all
   recreation centers should be open from 3 P.M. to 10 P.M. five days each
   week.

   Additional evening recreation centers will give so called cellar clubs a
   place to hold their meetings and conduct social and recreational
   activities in a wholesome atmosphere.

9. Board of Education stresses the so-called educational values of part-time
   highly organized play; while the Park Department emphasizes open play
   areas the year-round with an adequate opportunity for development of the
   child in proper surroundings through the playing of games in a fair and
   orderly manner without regimentation.  The Board of Education thinks that
   teaching play in school hours meets a problem which is most serious out of
   school hours and in vacation time.

10. 700 students have petitioned the opening of the swimming
    pool at the new Brooklyn College during the summer months.
    This facility, however, is under the jurisdiction of the
    Board of Higher Education.

                                (Robert Moses signature)
                                ROBERT MOSES

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                     LIST

10 CLOSED SCHOOL PLAYGROUNDS SHOULD BE OPEN -


                    MANHATTAN

P. S. 93 - 93rd Street and Amsterdam Avenue

           Inspected Sunday, July 31st at 4:50 P.M.

           Inspected llonday, August 1st at 3:00 P.M.

P. S. 58 - 317 West 52nd Street

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 1:45 P.M.

           Inspected Monday, August 1st at 4:00 P.M.

P. S. 84 - 430 West 50th Street

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 1:30 P.M.

           Inspected Monday, August 1st at 4:05 P.M.

P. S. 61 - Avenue D and East 12th Street

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 3:15 P.M.

           Inspected Monday, August 1st at 3:35 P.M.

P. S   36 - 710 East 9th Street

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 3:25 P.M.

           Inspected Monday, Aurust 1st at 4:00 P.M.

P, S.105 - 269 East 4th Street

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 2:55 P. M.

           Inspected Monday, August 1st at 2:45 P.M.

P. S. 77 - 28th Street and 1st Avenue

           Inspected Monday, August 1st at 3:00 P.M.

P. S. 46 - 196th Street and Briggs Avenue

           Inspected July 31st at 4:30 P.M.

P. S.143 - 111th Street and 35th Avenue, Corona

           Inspected Saturday, July 30th at 11:30 P.M.

P. S. 16 - 104th Street and 42nd Avenue, Corona

           Inspected Sunday, July 31st at 7:30 P.M.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       LIST "B"

20 Board of Education Swimming Pools not in closo proximity to Park
Department Swimming Pools or Beaches should be open on Saturdays and Sundays.

                         MANHATTAN

P.S. 11 - 21st Street, west of 8th Avenue

Commerce High School - 155 West 65th Street

Straubonmuller Textile High School - 351 West 18th Street

                           BRONX

P.S. 32 - 35th Street east of 9th Avenue

P.S. 40 - 20th Street, between 1st and 2nd Avenues

De Witt Clinton High School - Mosholu Parkway and Sedgwick Avenue

Evander Childs High School - Bronxwood Avenue and Gun Hill Road

James Monroe High School - Boynton Avenue and East 172 Street

Theodore Roosevelt High School - Washington Avenue and Fordham Road

Walton High School - Reservoir and Jerome Avenues

                       BROOKLYN

P.S. 89 - Newkirk Avenue and East 32nd Street

Brooklyn Technical High School - De Kalb Avenue and Fort Greene Pl.

Erasmus Hall High School - Flatbush and Church Avenuos

Franklin K. Lane High School - Evergreen Avenue and Covert Street

Now Utrecht High School - 79th Street and 16th Avenue

Samuel J. Tildon High School - Tildcn Avenue and East 57th Street

                         QUEENS

Andrew Jackson High School - 207-01 - 116 Avenue, St. Albans

Grover Cleveland High School - 2127 Himrod Street, Ridgewood

Jamaica High School - 167-01 Gothic Drive, Jamaica

Richmond Hill High School - 89-30 - 114th Street , Richmond Hill

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 15, 1938


                  Department of Parks annouacesHJnat the finals of the annual
American Ballad Contest, popularly known as the "Barber Shop Quartet"
competition, and a Hill Billy contest will take place on the Mall, Central
Park, Thursday, September 8th at 8:30 P.M.

            To qualify for the finals, each quarter for the American Ballad
Contest and each group trying for Hill Billy honors must participate in the
eliminations of that borough in which one or all of their members reside.
Quartets or troupes whose members reside outside of city limits but within
the metropolitan area, may compete in any one of the borough eliminations
provided they register with the Park Director of the borough in which they
have chosen to compete.

            The various borough eliminations of both contests take place on the
same designated nights as follows:

Borough      Location                     Date                 Time

Manhattan    Washington Square Park       Fri. Aug. 26         8:30 PM

Bronx        Poe Park                     Fri. Aug. 26         8:30 PM

Brooklyn     Prospect Park(Music Grove)   Thurs. " 25          8;30 PM

Richmond     McDonald Playground          Fri. Aug 26          8;30 PM

Queens       Forest Park (Music Grove)    Thurs, " 25          8t30 PM

           The Barber Shop quartets and Hill Billy troupes which are placed
first at each of the borough competitions will be eligible to compote in the
finals on September 8th.

          Awards will be made to the first, second and third place winners of
both contests.

          All quartets and troupes which are desirous of taking part in these
contests are requested to communicate with the Park Directors in charge of
their particular borough for further information regarding rules, costumes,
musical instruments, etc.

           The addresses of the Directors are as follows:

MANHATTAN - Kenneth S. Franklin, Arsenal Building, Central Park, 64 Street
            and Fifth Avenue, New York City

BROOKLYN  - Richard C. Jenkins, Litchfield Mansion, 5th Street and Prospect
            Park West, Brooklyn, New York

QUEENS    - Philip J. Cruise, Overlook, Forest Park, Kow Gardens, Long Island,
            New York

BRONX     - George L. Quigley, Bronx Park East and Birchall Avonue, The Bronx

RICHMOND  - James J. Mallen, Clovo Lakes Field House, Sunnyside, Staten
                Island, New York

                                    ####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 15, 1938


                 The Department of Parks announces that there are 83 softball
areas actively in use throughout the lark system. In Manhattan there are
32, in Brooklyn, 16, in Queens, 25, in The Bronx, 6, and in Richmond, 4.

                 In view of the fact that softball has attracted such
widespread interest, which is clearly indicated by the 146,756 children and
adults who have participated in softball games, and the 162 permits issued
for the use of softball areas in Queens alone, the Departaent of Parks has
made every effort to accommodate as many teams as possible by organizing
leagues in each softball area and conducting round robin tournaments with
playoffs between the leagues for the borough championship. The leagues are
comprised of different age groups, running from the midget class up to tho
senior class.

                 In the Borough of Manhattan at J. Hood Wright Playground
there is a league for boys from 10 to 16 years old consisting of 27 teams,
and also a league consisting of 8 teams, comprised mostly of young men whose
ages range from 17 to 25 years. The tournaments for both leagues are now in
progress.

                 The Borough of Queens has been conducting intra-playground
softball tournaments for 148 teams ontorod in the Park Departnont Playground
Leagues, since May, for noys 16 to 19 years and boys ovor 19 years of age.
The final Borough tournament will be held at Van Wyck Playground on August
21st, at 10:30 A.M., for Juniors, and for Seniors at 1:30 P.M.  The Senior
winners will represent Queens at Jones Beach State Park against the
Suffolk-Nassau County winners.

                 In the borough of The Bronxt the Park Department has
organized 3 softball leagues consisting of 32 teams, seven of which are in
the midget division, 8 in the Junior division and 14 in the Sonior division.


                 In the borough of Brooklyn a twilight league for adults has
been organized consisting of 12 teans which play thoir tournament games
at Canarsie Playground.

                 In Richmond saftball leagues hay© been organized in the
Di Matti Playground with a Senior league of 9 teams, in Lincoln Avenue
Playground with a Junior league of 4 teams and a Senior league of 9 teams,
and in McDonald Playground with a Junior league of 3 teams and a Senior
league of 3 teams.

                 The softbnll areas aro reserved, as far as practicable,
during weekdays up to 5:00 P.M. for youngsters of elementary and high school
age, and after 5:00 P.M., for adults who have no opportunity of playing
during the day time. Twilight softball leagues have been organized by various
industrial organizations, banking institutions and local neighborhood clubs,
such as the Telephone Company, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, Edison
Company, Chase National Bank, Bronx Elks, American Legion Post, etc.

                 The Mayor's Committee on Municipal Athletic activities was
constantly importuned to form a softball league for municipal employees. Such
a league, consisting of 16 departmental teams, was organized and the
tournament is now in progress at various Park Department softball areas
throughout the city.

                 In the latter part of August an inter-borough tournament
will be held among the leagues organized by the Department of Parks for the
purpose of determining the softball champions of the city
parks. Subsequently, arrangements will be mnde to have games between the Park
Department champions and the champions of Westchester, Nassau and Suffolk
Counties.

                                    ####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 16, 1938


       The Department of Parts announces the arrival Monday, August 15th, at
the Central park Zoo, of a jungle-bred male lion, four and a half years old.
The animal a gift froa Mr. Michael Lerner, was shipped from Nairobi, Kenya
Colony, East Africa, on the ateamship WEST ISLETA.  It is in fine condition
and photographs can be takes any morning prior to 10:45 A.M.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 18, 1938


                     Work was completed August 8th on a contract for paving
with concrete, walks and roads in the Flushing Bay Boat Basin area at
Northern Boulevard, Queens.

                     During the Fair, this area will serve as the marine
entrance for people coming to the Fair by boat; after the Fair, the Boat
Basin will be operated by the Department of Parks as a part of Flushing
Meadow Park.

                     The contract was let by the New York State Department of
Public Works, Division of Highways, and the work was done under the
supervision of the Department of Parks.  The work included the paving of a
twenty-five foot wide promenade over the steel sheet pile bulkhead of the
Basin, and the erection of a 5'6" steel railing; a twenty-four foot road and
two parking fields, accommodating about one hundred cars each, to serve the
Boat Basin; two twenty-four foot access roads from Northern Boulevard to the
Boat Basin, and a portion of the thirty foot park service road from the Boat
Basin to a point just south of Northern Boulevard, where it connects with the
existing park service road.  Six inches of topsoil was spread under this
contract in the Boat Basin area to prepare the ground for grass seeding and
planting.

                     The landscaping of this area is being done now, and will
be completed this Fall.

                                   # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 18, 1938


                   The Department of Parks announces that the First Annual
Life Guard Tournament will be held on August 24, 1938, at the Central
Mall, Jacob Riis Park, Queens.

                   It has for its objective the development and demonstration
of improved methods of life saving at beaches and fostering of healthful
competitive spirit among the life guards. There will be six 8-man teams
representing Rockaway Beach East; Rcckaway Beach West; Jacob Riis Park,
Queens; Coney Island, Brooklyn; Orchard Beach, The Bronx, and South Beach,
Staten Island; as well as two men from each of these beaches competing in the
individual contest.

                   The beaches under the jurisdiction of this Department
cover approximately 17 miles, and a staff of 591 life guards is employed.
There will be placed in competition for the first time the trophy emblematic
of the Municipal Life Guard Team Championship, to be known hereafter as the
"Mayor's Trophy" . This trophy will be in competition annually until it has
been won throe times by the same team, when it will remain in possession of
the beach having the successful team.

                   An individual trophy known aa the "Department's Trophy"
will be awarded the life guard securing the highest number of points in the
individual championship events. In addition, gold, silver and bronze medals
will be awarded individuals placing first, second and third in each event.

                                  # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            August 23, 1938


             The Department of Parks announces that its Third Annual Swimming
and Diving Championship will be held at Astoria Swimming Pool, Queens, Friday
at 2 P.M., August 26th.

             Teams representing the twelve outdoor Park Department swimming
pools and also the Bedford and Metropolitan indoor puol in Brooklyn, will
compete in swimming and diving events for the Supervisor's Trophy.  This
trophy which will be presented by Mayor LaGuardia, is to remain in the
winning pool's possession for one year, until won three times by any one
pool, which will then retain permanent possession of the trophy.  Gold,
silver and bronze medals will be given to the winner of each event.

             There will be six diving events and fourteen swimming events for
children of junior, intermediate and senior groups.

             The various teams have been practicing daily for this moot and
this year competition will be keon to take the championship away from Astoria
Pool which has won the championship for the past two years.

                                    ####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 7, 1938


                   AMERICAN BALLAD AND HILL BILLY CONTESTS


        The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the annual
American Ballad Contest, popularly known as the "Barber Shop Quartet"
competition, and Hill Billy contest, will take place on the Mall, Central
Park, Thursday, September 8th at 8:30 P.M.

        The Barber Shop Quartet will render songs that wore popular among the
habitues of the old tonsorial parlors in the early part of the present
century.  Each quartet will be groomed and dressed in some particular attire
befitting this era.

        In the Hill Billy contest, the competing troupes will wear costumes,
fashioned on styles peculiar to the inhabitants of Blue Ridge districts
famous for their mountaineer fostivals. The porformanco will consist of songs
and dances given to the tune of mountain music supplied from instruments of
their own choosing by each of the troupes.

        All the entrants of both contests on September 8th wore chosen as the
result of eliminations, held in each of the boroughs.

        Suitable prizes will be awardod to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners
of both contests.

         The following factors will be considorod by the judges in their
decision: Tone, Harmony, Interpretation, Costume, Musical and Dancing
Technique.

         The persons who have been invited to act as judges include: Mayor
LnGuardia, foimer Governor Alfred E. Smith, Park Commissioner Robert Moses,
Luther C. Steward, President of the Federal Employees Association, Mark
Andrews, well-known conductor of male choruses, Cesaro Sodero, orchestra
leader, and Zeke Manners of the WMCA Broadcasting Station.

         The Park Department Band will give a concert prior to the contests
from 7;00 to 8:15 P.M.  In addition it will render a few selections at
various intervals during the performance.

         Community singing will precede and follow the evening's program and
Harry Barnhart has been invited to act as the leader.

         The entire program will be broadcast by Station WNEW.

         Thousands of spectators witnessed the borough eliminations and it is
expected that the followers of the respective, contestants from each borough
will fill the Mall to capacity for the finals on September 8th.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          September 6, 1938


              The best season of the year for planting trees is the period
from September 15th until the ground is frozen to a depth of more than
one inch. With the rapid approach of this season, it is well to inform
the public of the regulations governing planting of trees in the City
streets by private property owners.

              Although the Department of Farks is charged with the care and
maintenance of all trees in street areas, it is not obliged to plant new
trees, nor to replace trees which have died from one cause or another.

              The Department receives hundreds of requests every year from
individuals requesting the planting of a tree. With the limited funds
available, it would be impossible to satisfy everyone; so it has been
necessary to adopt a policy of planting new street trees systematically, and
primarily along main thoroughfares bordering or leading to major park areas.

              To those who wish to plant trees in front of their property at
their own expense, the Department offers every form of cooperation within its
power. First, a permit is required.  The permit is issued by the office of
the Park Department in the borough in which the tree is to be planted. There
is no charge and the permit specifies the kind of tree, size of sidewalk
opening, size of excavation, the amount of topsoil and fertilizer required.
The Department will inspect the planting operation and will inform the
property owner when the tree has been satisfactorily planted, so that he can
be sure he is getting his money's worth.

              In. cases where a group of property owners got together to
plant trees, the Department will prepare contract plans and specifications,
assist in taking bids from reputable landscape contractors and inspect the
contract operations on the entire job.

              Although some of the regulations of the Department seem
stringent to a property owner who has received an offer from a landscape man
to plant a tree for $2.00 or $3.00, the result of following the regulations
is a reasonable assurance that a tree once planted will thrive and become an
asset to the property.  Trees planted by irresponsible contractors at
abnormally low prices are seldom healthy; they are planted with insufficient
soil and plant food and, if they survive at all, will never grow enough to
be an asset to either the city or the property owner.  Trees of improper
kind, or sizes or improperly planted are removed whenever they are
encountered.  The property owner who has planted them without a permit is
notified of his violation and is informed as to the proper steps to plant a
tree which will be acceptable and which can be satisfactorily maintained.

         Applications for planting of individual street trees may be obtained
at the borough offices of the Department located at:

    Mannattan:             Arsenal
                           64 Street & Fifth Avenue
                           New York City

    Brooklyn:              Litchfield Mansion
                           Prospect Park
                           Brooklyn, New York

    Bronx:                 Birchall Avenue and Bronx Park East
                           Bronx, New York

    Queens:                The Overlook
                           Kew Gardens
                           Forest Park, Quoana

    Richmond:              Field House, Clove Lakes Park
                           Victory Boulevard & Clove Road
                           West Brighton, Staten Island

         Those who are interested in banding together with their neighbors so
as to get the benefit of quantity work under contract should address their
inquiry to:

                            Mr. A. V. Grande
                            Assistant Landscape Architect
                            Department of Parks
                            Arsenal
                            64 Street and Fifth Avenue
                            New York City

                                  # # # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 12, 1938


                   The Department of Parks announces that its Revenue
Producing Facilities, which include 301 tennis courts, 10 golf courses, 12
swimming pools, 2 beaches and a Municipal Stadium, have shown a constant gain
in usage by the public and an increase in revenue to the City, with the
exception of the swimming pools, the income from which is lower than
anticipated due to the early rainy season and the cool weather since the
middle of August.  These facilities are operated on a self-sustaining basis,
with charges so fixed that there is no net profit to the City, the receipts
being barely enough to pay for their maintenance and operation.

                   In 1937, the first year of full operation, 2,371,983
patrons visited the pools, of which 678,040 where children admitted free
during weekday mornings.  923,529 were children who paid 10$ admission charge
and 770,414 were adults who paid 20$, giving a revenue to the City for paid
admissions of $246,435.70.

                   During the 1938 season with Betsy H-ad Pool in Brooklyn
operating with a temporary bath house and limited accommodations,
2,367,839 people visited the pools.  727,807 of these were children
admitted free.  789,059 were children who paid 10¢ and 720,424 were
adults who paid 20¢ admission, charge. At Betsy Head Pool, where charges
were reduced to 5¢ for children and 10¢ for adults due to the temporary
accommodations,24,544 children were admitted for 5¢ and 86,005
were adults who paid 10¢, giving the City a revenue of $232,918.40
for all pools, while the income from concessions and the sale of bathing
suits and towels increase this figure to $240.753.29.

                   During the past season there was a
"Learn-to-Swim-Campaign" conducted from June 11th to June 25th, at which time
10,200 children and 400 adults registered for swimming instruction.
Throughout the rest of the season it was estimated that 10,000 additional
children were taught to swim.

                   Staffs at the pools begin today to put them in readiness
for playground activities which will be carried on until the swimming season
next year.  The play centers will be opened to the public from 2 P.M. to 10
P.M. on weekdays and from 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. on Saturdays, Sundays and
holidays, beginning Saturday morning September 17th at 10 A.M.  Basketball,
volley ball, pacidie tennis, shuffleboard and handball courts will be marked
out on the pool bottoms, and during inclement weather such games as ping
pong, checkers, quoits and group games will be held indoors. Weekly dances
will be a feature during the winter months. No charge is made to the public
for the use of these play centers.

                The cost of operation of these facilities from January 1st
to date is $228,546.94.

                           FLOATING SWIMMING POOL

               During the past summer throe of the old floating baths
formerly operated by the Borough President of Manhattan, were completely
reconstructed into a single unit, providing two pools and dressing facilities
for men and women.  This was moored at 93rd Street and the Hudson River and
was opened to the public on August 5th.  It proved very popular as shown by
the attendance, as during the short season
6,202 children were admitted during the free period, 5,461 children
paid 10¢ and 11.236 adults paid 20¢, giving a revenue to the City from
this facility of $2,793.30.

                                     BEACHES

               On June 25th, 1937, Jacob Riis Park and Orchard Beach were
opened to the public and during the season 2,082,000 people visited
Orchard Beach and 1,725,000 people visited Jacob Riis Park. From bath
house and other sources the revenue from Orchard Beach amounted to
$96,143.78 and from Jacob Riis Park to $85,938.04. During the 1938
season these two beaches have shown an increase in attendance and revenue,
despite the poor weather conditions. Attendance at Orchard Beach this
year has been 2,268,300 and at Jacob Riis Park 2,152,700. Revenue derived
from Orchard Beach this year was $116,926.14 and from Jacob Riis Park
$92.688.45.

                                GOLF COURSES

        The largest increase in percentage of use over previous years of any
of the facilities was shown by the golf courses.  Through September 3rd there
was an increase of 87,373 rounds over a corresponding period in 1937, with an
increase in revenue also, the income in 1937 to September 4th being
$185,805.00 and this year $212,188.00.  The following figures show the
comparison in play this year over a corresponding period of last year at each
of the ten courses:
                                             1937                       1938

         Dyker Beach Golf Course             52,289                    64,365
         Van Gortlandt Golf Course           29,108                    37,910
         Mosholu Golf Course                 40,087                    47,877
         Split Rock Golf Cuurse              26,851                    28,971
         Pelham Bay Golf Course              34,002                    43,120
         Clearview Golf Course               56,182                    53,226
         Kissena Golf Course                 32,702                    42,954
         Forest P«rk Golf Course             35,867                    49,277
         Silver Lake Golf Course             27,971                    37,923
         LaTourette Golf Course              23,044                    29,753

                        TOTAL               358,003                   435,376

                                TENNIS COURTS

              In 1337 up to September 3rd, there were 20,130 junior and
senior permits issued, giving the City a revenue of $50,637.  In 1938 19,717
permits were issued giving the City a revenue of $59,151.  270,086
registrations were made at the tennis courts last year as compared viith
326,546 registrations for 1938

                             TRIBOROUGH STADIUM

              It has recently been decided to change the name of Randall's
Island Stadium to the Triborough Stadium as it indicates to those who
still do not know its location, that it may be reached by the Triborough
Bridge.

              Tne season at the stadium opened on April 2nd with a rugby game
between a picked American team and Cambridge University. Up to date it has
been used for 42 events of widely varying character, including 2 rugby games,
5 track meets, 3 double header baseball games, 16 performances of operetta,
10 performances of grand opera, 2 vaudeville presentations, 3 benefit
performances featuring swing music and one large public meeting.

              On two occasions the stadium was filled to capacity, the first
being on May 29th when a swing concert was given for the benefit of Local 808
of the American Federation of Musicians, and the second the meeting of the
World Youth Congress on the night of August 16th.

              The unusually rainy season made conditions generally
unfavorable for outdoor presentations. Bad weather conditions, combined with
labor troubles, caused the cancellation of the contract of Messrs. Shubert &
Gallo for the presentation of operettas, after a three weeks' run,
necessitating the booking of whatever attractions were available to
completo the season.

              The total attendance up to the present tine for all events is
172,642, of whom 71,001 took advantage of the convenient bus transportation,
while 24,311 automobiles used the parking fields.  At no time during the
season have there been any delays to the public in getting to and leaving the
stadium.

             The income to date is approximately $17,000.00, while the
expenditures have been $32,000.00 [?].

             The 1938 football season at the stadium will be inaugurated on
September 24th with a gamee betweenn Manhattan College and St. Bonaventure.
This will be followed on October 1st and 8th by two early season Fordham
games, after which there will be four high school double headers.  There will
be several professional football games on Sundays between a team representing
the New York Black Yankees and various opponents.

             With the increase in the number of revenue producing facilities
throughout the City and the greater interest of the public in them, the
revenues of the City have increased from $200,000 for the entire year of 1934
to $753,467.955 from January 1st to date.

                                  * * * * *

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 12, 1938


                      The Department of Parks announces the following offer
of the gift of an elephant to replace HILDA whose recent incurable spinal
injuries caused by a fall into a twenty-five foot dry moat at the Prospect
Park Zoo resulted in her tragic but merciful end:

                                  "ABRAHAM AND STRAUS, INC.
                                    BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

                                                            SEPTEMBER l2, 1938

        Commissioner Robert Moses
        80 Centre Street
        New York City

        My dear Commissioner:

                     Because we know how much the children of Brooklyn
        miss HILDA, the Brooklyn Zoo elephant whose fall resulted in
        its destruction the other day, Abraham and Straus offers
        herewith to present the Zoo with a brand new lady elephant
        embodying as many of Hilda's charms end graces as possible.
        This may seem an odd proposal for a department store to make,
        but children are among our best customers, and when one of
        of their favorite elephants meets a premature and untimely
        end, our sympathy is aroused and our aid enlisted.

                     We do not carry any elephants in our regular stock,
        although we have practically everything else, but we have in
        this emergency appointed a special elephant buyer who has
        lined up a young female Indian specimen, in excellent condition
        and with a longing to live in Brooklyn.  We stand ready
        to import this elephant to replace Hilda in the Prospect Park
        Zoo, and hope that in considering this offer you will think
        not only of Brooklyn's children, but will reflect on what its
        acceptance would do to cheer up Hilda's mate Bill, who feels
        terrible just now.

                                             Cordially yours,


                                          /s/    WALTER ROTHSCHILD"

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    Commissioner Moses replied as follows;


          "Mr. Walter Rothschild                 September 12, 1933
           Abraham & Straus, Inc.
           Brooklyn, N. Y.

          Dear Mr. Rothschild:

                 Your elephant offer is accepted with thanks.

                                    Sincerely,



                              /s/       ROBERT MOSES

                                        COMMISSIONER

    The new animal has already been purchased and is expected to arrive on
Friday, September 23rd.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 14, 1938


         The Department of Parks announces that the United States Maritime
Commission, through Captain Granville Conway, District Representative, has
been granted permission to tie up the three-masted, full-rigged ship TUSITALA
at the George H. Cromwell Recreational Pier (Pier 6) in Richmond.  The
Hoffman Island base of the Maritime Commission is unsuitable for such dockage
and the ship, which will be used for training purposes, will remain at this
pier with a full crew aboard, including the master who has been in command of
the vessel for the past five years.

         It has been arranged with the Maritime Commission that, on week-ends
and holidays, groups of Staten Island children and their parents will be
conducted through the vessel, and it is expected that many will take
advantage of this unique opportunity to become acquainted with the
construction of the fast disappearing sailing ship.

                                   - END-

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 15, 1938


         CITY-WIDE FINALS OF SHUFFLEBOARD AND BADMINTON TOURNAMENTS


                   The Department of Parks announces that the city-wide
finals of the Shuffleboard Tournament, consisting of singles only, will take
place at North Meadow, 96th Street and Central Park, September 17th at 2 P.M.

                   The winner and runner-up from each of the "borough
contests which wore held during the past three weeks for boys and girls over
18 years of age will be eligible to compete in the finals.  Gold and silver
medals will be awarded to the winner and runner-up and bronze medals to the
remaining borough finalists.

                    The city-wide finals of the Badminton Tournament will be
held at Mullaly Playground, Jerome Avenue and East 165th Street, September
17th a t 2 P.M.

                   Separate Badminton Tournaments for boys and girls over 16
years of age have been conducted in the boroughs of Bronx and Queens.  The
winner and runner-up of the borough contests, in both boys' and girls'
divisions, will qualify for the finals.  There will also be mixed doubles
matches with the winner of both boys' and girls' divisions constituting each
doubles team.

                    Gold and silver medals will be awarded to the winner and
runner-up in both the singles and mixed doubles matches.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 21, 1938


                        MODEL BOAT REGATTA TO BE CONDUCTED IN
                        PROSPECT PARK ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER
                                24TH, AT 2:30 P.M.
                                      

                   The large lake in Prospect Park on the afternoon of
September 24th will be the scene of the Newport Yacht Races in miniature.
Many adult owners of model yachts will compete in this classic. The
competition is open to all navigators of model sail boats who are over
twenty-one years of age. Prizes will be awarded by the Departaent of Parks
and there is no entry fee. All entries must report at the Model Boat House in
Prospect Park by 1:30 P.M. on Saturday, September 24th.

        1st race: - Open to any navigator with a model sail boat
                    of any siee.

        2nd race: - 50*80

        3rd race: - Open to models 40 to 50 inohes in length

        4th race: - Open to models 25 to 40 inches in length

        5th race: - Open to models 10 to 25 inches in length

                   Each entrant must own his own boat and sail it himself.
In the event that it becomes necessary, there will be elimination races to
determine the winner.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 22, 1938


              Although many of the people of Staten Island strenuously oppose
the construction of the State school on the Island, it will result in one
major iiaprovement which might otherwise have been delayed for some time.

               The first forward step in the establishment of a parkway system
on the Island was made possible by the decision of the State Department
of Mental Hygiene to locate the school adjacent to Willowbrook Park.  The
site chosen was originally opposed by the Park Department because it gave
no consideration to the park and parkway system which has been projected
since 1928.  Othor sites were studied by the Park Department but when
they were submitted to the State they were turned down.

               The Committee appointed by Mayor LaGuardia to consider the
site for the school met with Governor Lehman's representatives and finally
agreed on a plan which permitted the Mayor's Committee to recommend it. It
provides for the acquisition of the school site by the State and for some
adjacent land by the City. The State will deed approximately 38 acres of land
required for an addition to Willowbrook Park and as a part of the future
parkway system, to the City.  In return, the City will deed approximately 19
aoros of land to the State. The State has agreed that the buildings will all
be low and properly set back from the parks, parkways and streets.  They have
also agreed that the utility buildings will not be placed along the parkway,
and that the grounds will be properly landscaped so as to afford full
protection to the future park and parkway system.

               As a result of this acquisition and exchange of lands, the
City will have established a right-of-way for a Cross Island Parkway on
Staten Island between Manor Road at the easterly end of LaTourette Park and
Victory Boulevard at the north ond of Willosrbrook Park, and it will have
rounded out Willowbrook Park so that it can be made a more useful area.
Eventually, this parkway will start in Marine Park, proceed in a northerly
direction to LaTourette Park, circle the State school past Yillowbrook Park
and then proceed in a northerly direction to connect with the right-of-way
originally acquired as an approach to the Narrows tunnel in the vicinity of
Baron De Hirsch Cemetery. At this point it will branch in two directions, the
northerly extension proceeding to Bayonno Bridge and the westerly connection
to the Gothals Bridge.  The right-of-way of the Narrows tunnel approach was
acquired in a northeasterly direction as far as Clove Road, All of this
right-of-way can be utilized as a connection between the Gothals Bridge,
Bayonne Bridge and Clove Road.

          The other parkway planned for the Island will run in a north-south
dirootion starting at the north ond of the Island in the vicinity of Tompkins
Avenue and Hylan Boulevard, proceeding generally in a southerly direction
along the ridge of hills along the East Side of LaTourette Park; thence
southerly, paralleling Ramona Boulevard to the Outerbridge.  A spur can be
constructed to connect this parkway with Wolfe's Pond Park.

          The possibility of constructing Shore Boulevard from Marine Park
northerly to Fort Wadsworth and around the shore in front of Fort Wadsworth,
to connect with Edgewater Street in the vicinity of Hylan Boulevard is also
being studied.

          The Park Department feels that now is the time to plan this system
and acquire the property and that the land should be acquired within the next
few years; at any rate at least before the Narrows Vehicular Tunnel is
constructed.  A request has been submitted in the Capital Outlay Budget for
1939 for $60,000 to make the surveys needed to determine the lines of those
proposed parkways.  With this design and acquisition completed, the Borough
of Richmond will be far ahead of the position in which other growing boroughs
found themselves, and the City will not be forced to pay exorbitant prices in
order to properly carry out the program for these arterial connections.

                                    -END-

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 23, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that because of the incessant
popular demand bicycling will be permitted on the Rockaway Beach and Coney
Island boardwalks during the off season.

              Those two recreational facilities, consisting of five miles at
Rockaway and 2-3/4 miles at Coney Island, will add 7-3/4 miles to the 58-mile
program of proposed bicycle paths announced during the past summer.

              The two-planked bikeways with room for two or more cyclists
traveling side by side in opposite directions will be marked off in lanes and
patrolled by uniformed park attendants on bicycles. Because of their
location, the ocean breezes, and the wide expanse of water with the Atlantic
Highlands in the distance, they will offer not only an ideal opportunity for
exhilarating, outdoor physical exercise with safety, but also mental
relaxation.

              School children traveling to and from school,particularly in
Coney Island and Brighten Beach, will no longer have motorized competition,
the possibility of serious injury, and carbon monoxide fumes to contend with.

              Starting Monday, September 2Sth, end until May 1, 1939,
bicycling will be permitted on weekdays until 1:00 P.M. and on Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays until 11:00 A.M.

              If there is sufficient demand on the part of the cycling
enthusiasts for the rental of bicycles the Department of Parks will establish
concessions for that purpose.

                                     END

September 23, 1938

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 23, 1938


            FLASH! WHAT IS A ZOO TO CHILDREN WITHOUT BALLOONS!

            The Department of Parks announces that "Kelly's Comet" will make
its appearance in the Central Park Zoo on Sunday, September 25th.

            The "Comet" a streamlined balloon wagon constructed of chromium
plated steel with pneumatic rubber tires looks like a rocket plane ready to
take off into space. It is gaily painted with the City of New York colors of
orange, blue and white, and its side panels depict the heavens with clouds,
stars, the moon and the comet flying through the stratosphere.

            Mounted at an angle of 45 degrees is the space ship with two
orange colored rockets on either side.

            This balloon wagon vrill mark a revival in Central Park of the
sale of gas balloons which were discontinued in 1922 because of a City
ordinance prohibiting the use of inflammable gas.

            Concealed in the space ship will be a tank of helium, the
non-inflammable gas now used in U.S. Army and Navy dirigibles with which the
balloons will be filled and sold at a cost of ten cents each by a uniformed
attendant dressed in colors to match the comet. The balloons will consist of
every color in the rainbow, and each has painted on it some animal now housed
in the Zoo.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                         September 28, 1938

                                MAGIC CONTEST


           The Department of Parks announces that the finals of the Magic
Contest for boys and girls of Park Department playgrounds will take place at
the Mall, Central Park, Sunday, October 2nd at 2:30 P. M.

           Any boy or girl under 18 years of age was eligible to enter the
contest. Each of the boroughs has conducted eliminations to select those who
will qualify for the finals.

           The Department of Parks has instituted social classes in magic at
designated playgrounds in the five boroughs during the past year under the
supervision of playground directors interested in magic.

           According to the rules of the contest, each entrant's performance
shall not exceed 8 minutes. All sorts of novel tricks and stunts will be
included such as; Shadowgraphy, Juggling, Ventriloquism, Paper Tearing, Chalk
Talk, Rag pictures, punch and Judy, etc.

           The performers will be rated on the basis of the following factors:

General Performance will count for 60% and will include: suitability of
tricks, continuity of performance, originality of equipment, novelty of the
trick and general effect.

Showmanship will count for 40% and will comprise the following
characteristics: approach, patter, skill and personality.

           The following persons of prominence in the field of magic have
consented to act as judges: Paul Duke, W. R. Williston and Theodore
Hardeen, a brother of the late Houdini, the erstwhile master illusionist.

                                    E N D

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 3, 1938


                            AMATEUR PHOTO CONTEST


                 The Department of Parks announces that all the photographs
submitted for the Amateur Photo Contest will be on display in the Education
Hall of the American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park
West, beginning October 20th and running through October 27th from 10 A.M. to
5 P.M.  On Sunday, October 23rd, the hours will be from 1 P.M. to 5 P.M.

                 The display of contestant's pictures will be in conjunction
with the playground children^ Handoraft Exhibition conducted annually under
the auspices of the Park Department.

                 The photographs will be judged on October 20th at 4 P.M.  by
the following persons who have consented to act as judges: Paul J. Woolf,
John Gass, Samuel Gottscho and. Francis Cormier.

                 Prizes have been donated for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th place
winners of the contest by the Park Association of New York City, R. H. Macy &
Company, Davega City Radio, Inc. and Willoughby's. Twelve certificates of
award and honorable mention will also be given to other contestants who have
submitted the best pictures.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 8, 1938


                     CHILDREN'S HARVEST IN PARK GARDENS




                  The Department of Parks announces that on Columbus Day,
October 12th, at 1:30 P.M. harvesting of the crops in Children's Gardens,
maintained by the Park Department, will begin in the following gardens:


                                            Bronx
         Crotona Park Garden         St# Paul's Place S, Fulton
                                     Avenue


                                            Brooklyn
         Betsy Head Park Garden      Hopkinson & Blake Avenues
         Fort Greene Park "          Myrtle & N. Portland Avenues


                                             Queens
         Highland Park Garden         Jamaica & Cleveland Avenues


                  Medals will be awarded to the boys and girls producing the
best vegetables in each garden.

                  Hundreds of youngsters, ranging from eight to fourteen
years of age, will harvest their second crop of the season, consisting of
beets, carrots, swiss chard, leek, lettuce, radishes, kohl rabi, celery and
fennel.

                  All the vegetables were planted during July and are now
ready to be harvested by the little farmers who planted and cared for them
during the growing season.

                                     END

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                                                             October 10, 1938


           Following is the stenographic record of Park Commissioner Moses'
comments made before the closed meeting of the Board of Estimate this
afternoon on the subject of garbage disposal.

           I was quite impressed with my friend Bill's statement that all of
the public opinion on this subject has been created by me. I would just like
to warn this Board they had better not proceed on that theory.

       "About half of the time of my fellow Commissioner was taken up with
personalities. I am not going to discuss with him whether my procedure was
ethical or not, or whether there's been ruthless spending in the Park
Department for unnecessary projects, nor do I see any occasion to discuss my
experience and his in public works. The question of relative accomplishments
will not be settled in this Board. We'll just call that a day.

       "The Commissioner referred to the article in the Bronx Home News and
in that article I pointed to certain differences between the two types of
filling operations that would have to take place. One type would be used in
the middle of Jamaica Bay, and a totally different kind of operation at
Soundview.  I think since then President Ingersoll has brought out those
differences. There is a vast difference, of course, between going out into
the middle of Jamaica Bay on islands which are under water at high tide,
typical of Long Island meadow land, filling them up with garbage and refuse
and ashes, on the one hand, and building a bulkhead and bringing up to the
general level of surrounding territory a piece of land on the edge of the
Bronx River on the other. They are two totally different operations. I want
to add two things to what President Ingersoll said:

       "First, that in the picture that's been given of the relative cost of
these operations, there's been a complete failure on the part of the
Sanitation Department to give an accurate estimate, supported by figures, as
to just what could be done to protect this fill.

       "Now, I heard about the use of sand with clay in it, (clay doesn't
happen to be there, but we'll pass that over) as against the expense of
bulkheading, but I'd like to knew what it would cost. There haven't been
any figures on that and I am sure that it would be very expensive. You can't
fairly add in that cost at Soundview and leave it out at Jamaica Bay.

       "The other thing that perhaps is a little bit difficult to explain,
charge it up to idealism or anything you please, but I have done a little
work under similar conditions in exactly similar bedies of water, a little
bit further east on Long Island.  There's no essential difference between
Jamaica Bay and other bays all the way down the Island to the Hamptons.  We
have something at Jones Beach that's been pretty much admired around the
world.  People from abroad have come over here to see it and they seem to
think well of it, but perhaps they and the millions of local people are all
wrong. One of the things that has made Jones Beach what it is is the fact
that we have left the meadowlands precisely as nature made them. That's what
we want to do in Jamaica Bay. We like them the way they are. Commissioner
Carey is quite right in saying that we have no plans to do anything with
those islands because we want to leave them alone. After all, there are still
a few things left in metropolitan community that might be left as they were
before the white man came and these meadowlands are one of the things that we
ought to preserve just as they are.

       "There's a great difference in the view from the Rockaways and, say,
from the new Circumferential Parkway system, looking toward the Rockaways
across the bay with the meadowlands as they are, on the one hand, and looking
across the mountains of refuse, fill or anything else you want to call it, on
the other.  This new parkway development that we have as part of this whole
Jamaica Bay program on which we are already launched, is a reality, not a
dream. Anyone who doesn't understand that, doesn't understand our type of
planning the park work and I despair of making them understand it, but the
distinction is there just the same.

       "As to Orchard Beach: My reference in the Bronx Home News to Orchard
Beach was based on conditions that preceded the advent of Commissioner Carey.
The mistakes that were made there were not, as he says, of our making; they
were made by a predecessor. The worst thing that happened was the occasion
when the booms broke, which, he said, were perfectly guarded and taken care
of.  Tin cans, refuse and garbage were scattered all over the Westchester
shores and brought down on our neck not only the officials of Westchester but
the State Commissioner of Health. There is no question about what happened on
that occasion; it's in all the newspapers; and is acknowledged. It resulted
in a conference in the Mayor's office with Commissioner Hammond, which I
won't refer to any further. Carey ought to get his history straight.

      "Now, as to Riker's Island, why is the Commissioner getting out of
Riker's Island?   Why do we want to clear Riker's Island for the Fair?
Obviously, because it is a nuisance and if it isn't a nuisance and these
conditions are all as admirable as he says they are, why change them?    We
went all over that. It was discussed in your Board in printed reports and
everyone agreed that the mountain should be removed.

       "The same thing applies, of course, to the Flushing Meadow, I am not
going to argue with the Commissioner as to whether or not that heap in
Flushing Meadow that was there for so many years and rose to ninety feet at
some points proved to be a blessing in disguise when we came to the World's
Fair. The fact of the matter is that the World's Fair would have been held
there anyhow for a lot of other reasons, but it certainly wasn't an asset,
except from the point of view of having a certain amount of fill which we
could move cheaply. The fact of the matter was that up to that time it was a
tremendous neighborhood detriment, and was so recognized by everybody. Ask
the people of Corona whether they liked it.

       "As to these land fills north of Jamaica Bay or anywhere else,
President Ingersoll, I think, has pretty well brought out the difference,
between a land fill and a water fill. The fact of the matter is that
Commissioner Carey ought to have given a picture to this Board and should
still give it, of the difference between summer and winter operations. There
is a great difference between a fill that is largely ash, on the one hand,
and a fill that is largely garbage and refuse on the other, and on most of
these land fills, and certainly those in the park system, we have insisted
upon a quality of material that would not be a neighborhood detriment and it
did consist largely of heavy matter.

       "As far as the land fills are concerned at Jamaica in the area north
of Jamaica Bay, the fact of the matter is that with the approval of the
Circumferential Parkway and the availability of City and State money, a good
deal of that work will not only have to stop, but it will have to stop
immediately.  We haven't any time for this particular kind of filling on this
project. We have nineteen months to do a job that would normally be done in
thirty-six months. We must build an immense stretch of parkway, with every
kind of bulkheading, every kind of filling, all kinds of bridges. We haven't
any time to do this by any other than the most modern engineering
methods. The Commissioner doesn't need to worry about my asking him for any
help on the Circumferential because I don't need any and I won't want any.

       "This Fresh Kills plan in Staten Island, of course, is entirely new to
me and to the engineers who have been working with me. I knew that as an
alternative the Commissioner had something in Staten Island in mind.  I hear
today it is to be at Fresh Kills and I see on the map that it is the area
that is surrounded by New Springville Park, Willowbrook Park and LaTourette
Park.  I have never shared all the enthusiasm that some members of this Board
have for planning, but I thought that before any such drastic scheme was
proposed by a city official, involving a completely new use of a lot of land
in one of our boroughs, land bordering on the park system (and this map even
includes part of one of the parks), I would have thought that the Planning
Commission would have discussed that, and, that it would have been discussed
with all the other public officials involved, including the Borough
President, the Park Department and all others.

        "Now, there is a great difference between going into a limited area
for two years to round out and complete a park in the Bronx and going to
Staten Island and dumping without any notice to anybody concerned on an area
arbitrarily picked out by the Sanitation Department. I would like to know
something about that from the point of view of the park system. That's not
unreasonable; that isn't reaching out for any other jurisdiction that doesn't
belong to me; that's common sense.

        "A question is raised as to land acquisition, drainage and
bulkheading.  How are you going to carry out your operations?  We are told,
on the one hand, that this Soundview operation will cost a certain amount of
money. That's based on facts which we have checked. We are told that as an
alternative, there's a Staten Island scheme and the facts aren't there. You
don't know what it will cost. You haven't any idea what you will have to do
there before such an operation would even be tolerable and I suggest that you
get the facts before you do much about it.

        "Now, this whole question really comes down to one of major
policy. Does this Board want to give up incineration?  Does it want to give
up without an effort, educating the people to separate the different kinds of
material?  That's up to you. I suggest, also, that you apply some common
sense to this problem because the average fellow knows that the smoke, smell,
flies, rats, mountains of undesirable material go with most filling
operations by water and barge and you are not going to make the average
fellow, just on somebody's statement, I don't care how eloquent, earnest, or
authoritative he is, believe that these objections don't exist. Cost isn't
the only test either, nor engineering and contracting theories; you have got
to deal with public opinion.

        "I am going to reserve the right as a public official to continue in
every way that I can to oppose ruining Jamaica Bay by this dumping operation.
As far as Staten Island is concerned, I am going to oppose anything that I
think is going to be harmful to the park system. As far as Soundview is
concerned, and since the Commissioner says that he is going to be in complete
charge and that I can't guarantee anything, I withdraw the suggestion that
you go to Soundview.  I don't want him there under the circumstances. All
that I ask of him is that he keep away from the park system."

The President of the Council:

    Commissioner, you used Riker's Island as a yardstick for what we might
expect wherever else the Commissioner goes.  I would like to point out that
Riker's Island was not built up with the cut and cover system; Was it?


Commissioner Moses:

     Partly, Yes.  Recently it has been filled, in just that way.

The President of the Council:

     I mean you disapprove of the cut and cover system.  Don't you?

Commissioner Moses:

    No, I don't disapprove of the cut and cover system.  I approve of it
under certain conditions and with certain kinds of materials and not under
other conditions,

The President of the Council:

     You don't want any burnable material in the fill at all?

Commissioner Moses:

     No, I don't say that either. I want a small percentage ot it, I thought
I made that clear; not too large a percentage of it and I want it in places
where it can be filled up and covered and where it doesn't constitute a
mountain of refuse.  This Bronx operation simply brings low property up to
the grade of surrounding property.  It is entirely different from the Staten
Island proposal or the proposal in Jamaica Bay.  You can't laugh these
things off; we have seen them all.  Tell someone who saw that dump out in
Corona for 50 or 40 years that this long term dumping is all right, that
it's fine, and listen to his answer.  There was no effort made to build the
Flushing Meadow area to some new grade if there had been, we would have had
it all ready for the World's Fair without additional expense. You build a
mountain of refuse, of garbage and ashes there with rats and smoke and fire
and everything that goes with those things.

Commissioner Moses (continued)

     I made the suggestion about Soundview Park just to be helpful, I told
the Commissioner at the time I made it that I would help him with the
question of approval or disapproval of local people and I discussed that
matter with the Borough President of the Bronx also. I thought that on a two
year operation, properly controlled and with complete cooperation on all
hands and no controversy and dispute, that we could do something there that
would give him. two years to work out a better and new policy for the rest of
the City.  He doesn't want that. He says he is going to be the only authority
as to what constitutes clean fill. All right, let him go sonewhere else. We
don't need the addition to Soundview Park.  I'd like to have it. I think it
would be a pity not to have it. I have no objection to his land fill, or at
least the present land fill; none at all; no criticism of it, but I can get
along without it. You members of the Board decide what to do with this
garbage.  The President of the Borough of the Bronx.

     Commissioner Moses, I had maps all laid out for Soundview Park. Do you
want me to take them back?

Commissioner Moses:

     Yes, I withdraw any request before the Board for Soundview Park and
request that the matter be dropped.

The President of the Borough of the Bronx:

     Then you refer back those maps that we have all laid out.   (Addressing
the Secretary.)

Commissioner Moses:

     Mr. President, if you will excuse me, I have to go to a meeting in the
Mayor's office.

The President of the Council:

     Will you be in the building if we want your advice?

Commissioner Moses:

    Yes, I will be in the building.

                                     end

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                                                             October 12, 1938

                           OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
                                   OF THE
                              BOROUGH OF QUEENS
                              21-10 49th Avenue
                              Long Island City
                                    N. Y.

                                                          FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


              According to this morning's papers, the Comptroller has advised
the Mayor that the Boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn have to give up the
Circumferential Parkway plan, I can't understand this quick change on the
part of these city-wide officials. The city has acquired the land needed for
the improvement and has thrown the people out of the houses so that the work
can go ahead and everything is all set for construction to start.

              Only a month ago the Mayor was talking to President Roosevelt
about a scheme for financing both this parkway ard the Battery-Hamilton
Tunnel, which would have run to about one hundred million dollars. When he
couldn't get that, he compromised and agreed with the Federal Government to
go ahead with the construction of the parkway. Only three weeks ago he
instructed the Deputy Mayor to sign an application for the $12,000,000 grant
on this project. The application was also signed by the Comptroller and the
then Acting Mayor, Newbold Morris.  What happened overnight to make them
decide on this sudden change in attitude towards this project?  Didn't they
know as much about the finances of the city three weeks ago as they do today?
If they could afford to spend one hundred million a month ago for a tunnel,
they can afford to do this parkway job now and still build schools and
hospitals.  The main difficulty with the financial situation in the city is
the five-cent fare, and if they would stop playing politics with that, the
city would be in a position to take care of these improvements. As a matter
of fact, from the report of the Board of Transportation, they claim that it
costs nearly eleven cents to carry a five-cent passenger on the City Subway.

              This Circumferential job will cost the City of New York
$l6,000,000 and President Ingersoll and I agreed that we would take 20% of
this cost, 10% on the Borough of Brooklyn and 10% on the Borough of
Queens. The other 80% would be made a city-wide assessment, which is the way
it ought to be done.  It would be collected in five years.  It isn't a
long-term bond proposition where the city's credit is tied up for fifty
years.

            What use can we make of the Planning Commission if their advice
isn't listened to in a thing like this?  This was one of the first jobs they
approved when they came into office and only a day or two ago they
recommended to the Board of Estimate that the city go ahead with the job.

            The city has invested millions in the land for this project and
unless it goes ahead with the improvement, the investment will be lost to the
city for years. On the other hand, if the highway, service roads,
landscaping, and all the rest of the work is done, it will not only offset
the price of the land but will increase the revenue to the city by increasing
taxable values.  Take a look at any of the parkways that have been built and
see what has happened adjacent to them.  Look at Grand Central Parkway, built
in 1933, ana compare the value of the property adjacent to this improvement
today with what it was when the job was first laid out. Just yesterday I saw
a report made by the Park Department on the increase in values adjacent to
the Henry Hudson Parkway. Already the city's income has increased over a
million dollars a year because of this project, and that job isn't even
finished.  There has been even a greater return to the city on the Grand
Central Parkway and when this Circumferential job is done through the
undeveloped sections of Brooklyn and Queens, it will bring an even greater
return to the city by opening up this land, which you can't even reach today.

            I don't intend to lay down on this job and let them take this
construction money away from the Borough of Queens.  It is an improvement
that has been on the top of the list for a long time and now, when this
twelve million dollar gift from the Federal Government is available to put
men to work in this borough, to give the people of Queens a real improvement
which is needed now and will be needed more as time goes on, the Comptroller
and the Mayor talk about taking it away from this job and spending it
someplace else. They are not going to get away with it.

                              (Signed) GEORGE U. HARVEY
                                    President of the Borough
                                          of Queens.

October 12, 1938.

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                                                             October 13, 1938

                        "TO RECORD THE FACT THAT
                           WILLIAM WHITS NILES
                         WAS THE FOUNDER OF THE
                         BRONX RIVER PARKWAY
                         THIS MEMORIAL HAS BEEN
                         ERECTED BY HIS FRIENDS"


         Music will be provided by the P.S. #71 band.

         Members of the State Council of Parks who arc convening for their
124th meeting to be held on Saturday, October 15th, at 1:30 P.M.  at Mohansic
Park on the Bronx River Parkway Extension, will attend both ceremonies.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 14, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that on Saturday, October
15th, ceremonies will be held at Mt. Morris Park, Fifth Avenue and 120th
Street at 9:30 A.M., in connection with the completion of the reconstruction
of the park.

                Besides Park Commissioner Robert Moses who will preside, the
others taking part in the exercises will be Col., Brehon B.  Somervell,
W.P.A. Administrator of the City of New York, Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs,
President of the Borough of Manhattan, Hon. Ferdinand Q.  Morton of the
Municipal Civil Service Commission and Hon. Fiorello H.  LaGuardia, Mayor of
the City of New York.

                Music for the occasion will be provided by the Park
Departmont band.

                On the same day at 10:30 A.M., the Park Department will
dedicate the Niles Memorial Flagpole on the Bronx River parkway at 226
Street, erected by friends to honor William White Niles, civic worker and
former member of the Bronx River Parkway Commission.

                At those exercises William H. Bolton will preside and
introduce Hon. Robert Moses, Commissioner of New York City Parks and Chairman
of the State Council of Parks; Jay Downer, former Chief Engineer of the Bronx
River Parkway Commission; Francis R. Masters, Chairman of the Taconic State
Park Commission and Roderick Stephens, President of the Bronx Board of Trade.

                 Upon conclusion of the speaking, Mrs. William White Niles
will unveil the plaque which reads as follows:

                                 [ILLEGIBLE]

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 14, 1938


                 The Department of Parks announces that the final rounds of
the New York Municipal Golf Championship will be played on Sunday, October
16th, 1938, at Forest Park Golf Course.  Entries for the tournament will
start from the first tee at 7:30 A.M. and will continue through the day.  The
course will be closed to the public, but galleries will be permitted to watch
the tournament.

                 Those qualified to play on Sunday are players who lasted up
to the quarter finals in match play competition on their home courses.

                 Prizes will be awarded to the winner and runner-up of the 36
holes of medal play and a team prize will be given to the four low gross
scorers from any one of the ten courses operated by the Park Department.

                 After the four men have teed off, the women who have
qualified will play to decide the winner of the Women's Division, This
competition will consist of 18 holes of medal play and a cup will be awarded
to the winner.

                 Below are the names of the qualifiers and their starting times
for the first round.
                                      
                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 14, 1938

           Bids were received on October 10th by the Department of Parks at
the Arsenal Building, Fifth Avenue and 64th Street in Central Park on a
contract for alterations to the Natatorium Building at the Rice Memorial, in
Pelham Bay Park, Borough of The Bronx.

           The work to be done consists of the construction of new
ventilators over the shower rooms and on the roof, setting copper flashing
and repairs to the roof where required.


           The three lowest bidders were:

    Pipe Engineering Co., Inc.         $ 9,179.00

    Golco Builders                       9,722.00

    Chester Construction Co., Inc.      10,284.00


           The Engineer's estimate for the work was $9,655, and these
alterations will require ninety (90) calendar days for completion.

                                  . E N D .

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 17, 1938


         The Department of Parks announces that it will conduct a city wide
"Whistling Contest" at Mullaly Playground, Sunday, November 13th at 2:30 P.M.

         This contest, a new feature of the Park Department's recreational
program, is open to all types of whistlers, finger and lip.  The
classification of songs or tunes permitted in the contest are as follows:

         1. Whistling soloists (classical, semi classical and
            popular songs).

         2. Whistling novelties.

         3. Bird imitators.

         The competitors will be placed into two age groups - under 18 years
and over 18 years, with separate divisions for boys and girls.

         The Borough eliminations will be held as follows:

         Manhattan     October 29       Roosevelt Playground      2:30 P.M.

         Richmond        "     27       Cromwell Center           8:30   "

         Brooklyn      November 1       Picnic House, Prospect    8:00   "
                                           Park

         Bronx         November 2       Mullaly Playground        8:00   "

         Queens          "      6       Jackson Heights Playgd.   2:30   "

         All those desiring to enter the "Whistling Contest" are requested to
communicate with the playground director in charge of the playground nearest
his home. Each contestant must participate in the borough eliminations in
order to be considered eligible to enter the finals at Mullaly Playground,
November 13th.

         The winner of each classification in the borough eliminations, from
both age groups of the boys' and girls' divisions, will qualify for the city
wide competition.

          Gold and silver medals will be awarded to the winner and runner up
in each of the throe classifications and bronze medals to the remaining
borough finalists.

          The following persons, prominent in the radio and whistling
world, have consented to act as judges: Lew Olson, professional
whistler, Nick Kenny, Radio Editor of the Daily Mirror and Henry Boyd,
the official bird whistler of the Columbia Broadcasting System.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 17, 1938

                                      
                 AMATEUR PHOTO CONTEST AND HANDCRAFT EXHIBIT


          The Department of Parks announces that the 344 photographs
submitted for the Amateur Photo Contest will be on display in the Education
Hall of the American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park
West, beginning October 20th and running through October 27th from 10 A.M. to
5 P.M. On Sunday, October 23rd, the hours will be from 1 P.M.  to 5 P.M.

          The display of contestants' pictures will be in conjunction with
the playground children's Handcraft Exhibition conducted annually under the
auspices of the Park Department.

          The dual exposition will take place in the midst of a floral show
consisting of plants that are on view at Park Department greenhouses and
nurseries during the winter months and also some early chrysanthemums which
will be a forerunner of the Chrysanthemum Show scheduled for the last week
of October.

          The Handcraft Exhibit will include objects made by children of all
ago groups in the various Handcraft Classes supervised by the Department of
Parks at the numerous playgrounds under its jurisdiction as an integral part
of a comprehensive all year-round recreation program.

          The heterogeneous collection will reveal skilful leather, soap and
chip carving, raffia, reed, bead, weaving and basketry work. Useful and
decorative articles for home and school have also been made from such
materials as cork, wood, metal, leather, wool, crepe paper and
felt. Discarded materials of various sorts have been salvaged from the waste
heap by the young craftsmen and converted into instruments of practical
value, viz. baskets made of clothes-pins, lamps made of bottles, and flower
sets made from tin cans.

          Other contributions to the handcraft display consist of wearing
apparel such as sweaters, scarfs and hats with singular designs and beautiful
color schemes; and sets of kindergarten plates rimmed with Nursery Rhymes
constructed of cardboard and highly furbished with shellac.

          Demonstrations in the technique of handcraft will be given during
the exhibition by children from each of the boroughs in the following:
leather and chip carving, rood-work, boad-work, metal work and hook rug
construction.

          The best five articles in each division of handcraft will be
determined and certificates of award presented to the youthful artificers who
produced the handiwork.

          Scenes depicted by the photographs in the contest might be
classified into two groups with variations or combinations of both in each
group: (1) scenes of natural grandeur, landscaped areas and animal life as
found in New York City Parks; (2) scenes of youth and age actively engaged in
recreational activities at Park Department playgrounds, swimming pools and
other recreation areas.

        The photographs will be judged an October 20th at 4 P.M. by the
following persons who have consented to act as judges: Paul J. Woolf, John
Gass, Samuel Gottscho and Francis Cormier.

        Prizes have been donated for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th place winners
of the contest by the Park Association of Now York City, R. H.  Macy and Co.,
Davega City Radio, Inc. and Willoughby's.  Twelve certificates of award and
honorable mention will also be given to other contestants who have submitted
the best pictures.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 18, 1938


        The final 36 holes of medal play in the New York City Municipal Golf
Championship held Sunday, October 16th at the Forest Park Golf Course was won
by Peter DeCaprio of the Split Rock Golf Course. The winner had a 79 in the
morning round and in the afternoon ho shot a 76, for a total of 155 for both
rounds.

        Thomas Strafaci of Dyker Beach and Peter Ladislaw of Clearviow were
in a tie for runner-up position with scores of 156 for both rounds, shooting
scores respectively of 78-78 and 74-83.  In a play off of nine holes,
Ladislaw was the winner with a score of 37 for nine holes.

        Mrs. C Roettgor of Polham Golf Course was the winner in the women's
division with a score of 98. Sixteen women participated in the tournament.

        Sixty-four entries played in the men's division, representing the ten
golf courses operated by the Department of Parks.

        The team prize awarded each year was won by The Clearview Golf Course
team represented by P. Ladislaw, 156; R, McDonald, 159; A. Tucker, 164; and
G. Rosenberg, 167, for a team score of 646.

                                    -END-


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 20, 1938


          The New York City Parkway and Triborough Bridge Authorities
announce that on the morning of October 20th, stainless steel plaques
presented by Mr. F. H. Frankland, representing the American Institute of
Steel Construction, Inc., were placed on the Little Hell Gate Lower Level
Bridge built by the Triborough Bridge Authority to span Little Hell Gate
between Randall's and Ward's islands in the East River and also the Marine
Parkway Bridge spanning Jamaica Inlet and linking the Boroughs of Brooklyn
and Queens.

           These plaques are being installed as permanent records of the
awards made in 1937 in a contest sponsored by the American Institute of Steel
Construction.  The Institute makes annual awards for the most beautiful
bridges and does so in order to demonstrate that steel bridges can be not
only efficient and economical, but also aesthetically pleasing.  Designation
of the prize-winning bridges is by a committee composed of loading Consulting
Engineers and Architects.

           The Marine Parkway Bridge spanning Rockaway Inlet is one of the
great Metropolitan water crossings linking the Boroughs of Brooklyn and
Queens. Formerly the crossing of vehicles were by ferrys or by circuitous
routes to Queens and over the Cross Bay Boulevard.  It joins Marine Park,
ultimately to be the largest park in Brooklyn when its great acreage of
meadow land is developed, with Jacob Riis Park the largest public recreation
area on the Rockaway peninsula.  The Marine Parkway Bridge and Marine Parkway
are linked to the 36-mile long Circumferential Boulevard system which will
encircle all the rest of the shore of Brooklyn extending from Owl's Head
Park, at the Narrows, around the entire outer border of Brooklyn and Queens
to the Bronx-Whitestonc Bridge now under construction.  The Brooklyn
Circumferential Parkway recently approved by the Board of Estimate, when
completed, will make the Marine Parkway a link of one of the greatest and
important express arteries in the world, connecting with the Westchester
Parkway system north of New York City, through the Henry Hudson Parkway, the
West Side Highway, and the proposed Battery tunnel, providing a new express
route for the people of Manhattan and Brooklyn to reach Marine Park, Jacob
Riis Park and the Rockaway rcninsula, or to continue easterly to Long Beach
and eastern Long Island by way of the Long Island State Parkway system.

          The Bridge replacing the former ferry is slightly more than 4000
foot long with three 540 foot spans in the center bridging the channel,
flanked by five shorter spans on either side. The two spans flanking the
contral span have a clearance of 50 feet above mean high water.

           The central section, the longest vertical highway lift span in the
world, is 55 feet above the high water line in its normal position, and
raises an additional 95 feet, making a total clearance of 150 foot to pormit
the passage of large vessels.

           The Marine Parkway Bridge was built at a total cost of $3,750,000;
12,000 tons of steel and 47,000 cubic yards of concrete wore usod in its
construction.  Contracts for construction were signed on June 30, 1936; work
started shortly afterward, and the bridge was completed and opened to traffic
on July 3, 1937. E.H. Praeger was Chief Engineer; Edward W. Stearns,
Assistant Chief Engineer; Allston Dana, Engineer of Design; Aymar Embury II,
Architect; Col. H. W. Hudson, Engineer of Construction; American Bridge
Company, Fabricators, and Corbetta Construction Co., Inc., did the
substructure.

           Award of the first prize in Class B to the Little Hell Gate Low
Level Bridge is especially noteworthy because it is the second structure
built as part of the Triborough Bridge project to be so honored, the
suspension bridge over the East River having received first prize for Class A
bridges completed in 1936.

           Located midway between the Triborough Bridge and the New York
Connecting Railroad Bridge, the new structure gives access to Ward's Island
from the mainland via the Triborough Bridge and Randall's Island. Although
the Triborough Bridge crosses both Randall's and Ward's Islands, it makes no
connection with the latter but passes over it at a relatively high level.
However, vehicular ramps and pedestrian stairways are provided at the bridge
junction structure on Randall's Island.  The Little Hell Gate Low Level
Bridge is so called because it spans Little Hell Gate with a roadway only
about 40 feet above high water at its highest point.

           The Manhattan State Hospital of the New York State Department of
Mental Hygiene is on Ward's Island and construction of the Low Level Bridge
made possible the discontinuance of ferry service from Manhattan, formerly
the only means of access. At a future date the Island is to be developed into
a public park to supplement the facilities now being developed by the Park
Department on Randall's Island.

           The bridge consists of three hingeless steel arch spans of 167
foot, 280 feet and 242 foot respectively, with abutments on the banks of the
two Islands and with two intermediate piers in the waterway. All abutments
and piers rest on solid rock and are of concrete faced with masonry.  The
steel arch ribs are spaced 26 feet apart and carry a roadway 24 foot wide
flanked by two 7 foot sidewalks. Including the approach ramps, the total
length of structure is 1,130 feet.

           The Little Hell Gate Low Level Bridge was built at a cost of
approximately $530,000. Construction was started in September, 1936, two
months after the Triborough Bridge was put in operation. It was completed and
opened to traffic on May 15, 1937. Engineers: Madigan-Hyland, Consulting and
Supervising Engineers; Weddell & Hardesty, Consulting Enginoors on lift and
flanking spans; Robinson & Steinman, Consulting Engineers on design of dock
spans; Aymar Embury II, Consulting Architect. The American Bridge Company did
the fabricating and erecting and Frederick Snare Co.  built the substructure.

           It is interesting to note that while the Northern Boulevard Bridge
over the intra-mural Drive through Flushing Meadow Park will not be
commemorated with a plaque it did receive honorable mention in Class B. It
was built by the State Department of Public Works on the design of the City
Department of P^rks at a total cost of $448,376; the engineers were
Madigan-Hyland; it was completed on September 10, 1937 and opened to traffic
on June 8 of the same year. It has seven spans of 49.5 feet.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 21, 1938


            The Department of Parks announced today that starting 9 a.m.,
October 24th, the southbound roadway of the Henry Hudson Parkway from George
Washington Bridge to 79th Street, will be closed for approximately one week,
Depending upon weather conditions, construction will be completed so that
this roadway can be reopened on October 31st.

            The construction of this section of the parkway was particularly
difficult because of the deep mud along the edge of the river and required a
vast amount of rock and other heavy fill material to secure a stable
foundation for the outer section of the parkway.  While the roadway is closed
the sections of pavement which have settled at 93rd, 100th rnd 146th Streets
will be taken out and reconstructed at final grade so as to eliminate the
present depressions which are annoying to traffic.

             During this period of construction southbound traffic will be
required to leave the parkway just south of George Washington Bridge and may
not enter it again until it reaches 79th Street. Riverside Drive will be the
most convenient route between these two points.

                              -   E   N   D   -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 21, 1938


        The Department of Parks announces that the 344 photographs submitted
for the Amateur Photo Contest conducted by the Park Department were reviewed
by the board of judges, Thursday, October 20th at 4 P.M.  at the Education
Hall of the American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park
West.

        The following were adjudged the winners:

        1st Place  -   Martha Berger - 234 East 70th Street, New York City

        2nd Place  -   Robert Price - 1685 Bryant Avenue, Bronx

        3rd Place  -   M. Moskowitz - 749 East 175th Street, Bronx

        4th Place  -   W. E. Johnes - 20 Laurel Hill T.rrace, New York City

        Honorable mention was given to the following contestants:

        Salvatoro Asaro - 342 East 49th Street, New York City

        Dewey Carver - 1100 Grand Concourse, Bronx

        Jack Ladonheim - 1660 Crotona Park East, Bronx

        Andrew Costikyan - 520 West 122nd Street, New York City

        Herbert Hamburger - 322 East 8th Street, New York City

        Manny Blanc - 227 East 3rd Street, New York City

        Ardent Gravesen - 157 West 84th Street, New York City

        Mr. M. Moskowitz of 749 East 175th Street, Bronx, besides being
awarded 3rd prize, received honorable mention for three of his photographs.

        Miss Martha Berger, the first prize winner, is 17 years of age and a
student at Hunter College.

        The prizes consist of the following:

        1st Prize - a camera - Kodak Anastigmat Special f. 4,5 lens with a
Compur Rapid shutter and case.  Donated by H. R. Macy & Co.

        2nd Prize - a camera - Kodak 616 Senior f 6.3 lens. Donated by
Davega City Radio, Inc.

        3rd Prize - a camera - Argus Speed Camera Model C. Donated by
Willoughby's, Inc.

        4th Prize - certificate entitling holder to $25.00 in photographic
supplies. Donated by the Park Association of New York City, Inc. 

        Certificates of merit will be awarded to the contestants receiving
honorable mention.

        Presentation of prizes to the winning competitors of the Amateur
Photo Contest will take place Wednesday, October 26th at 4 P.M. at the
Education Hall, of the American Museum of Natural History.

        The judges of the contest wore: Samuel Gottscho, Paul J. Woolf, John
Gass and Francis Cormier.

    All the pictures submitted for the Amatour Photo Contest will remain on
display at the Education Hall of the Museum, until Thursday, October 37th.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 21, 1938


     The Department of Parks announces that arrangements have been
made for the formation of playground children's bands and orchestras
starting Monday, October 24th.

     Any boy or girl, up to 18 years of age, xvho plays a musical
instrument, is eligible to compete for membership in the juvenile
band or orchestra.

     Mr. Attilio Oastellucci, leader of the Park Department Band and an
instructor of music for the past 30 years, will supervise the organization of
these musical units at official rehearsal centers located in a designated
playground of each borough as follows:

Borough                            Time                   Playground

Bronx      Saturdays -     2-4 P.M.   St. James Playground - E . 193 St.
           Sundays   -     2-4 P.M.        and Jerome Avenue

Brooklyn   Wednesdays-     4-6 P.M.    McLaughlin Playground - Jay,
                                           Bridge and Tillary Sts.

Queens     Fridays   -     4-6 P.M.    Von Doulen Playground - 138
                                           Street & Archer Avo., Jamaica

Richmond   Thursdays - 7:30 - 9 P.M.   McDonald PI ayground - Forest
                                           Avenue, near Broadway

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 21, 1938


       The Department of Parks announces that the city wide finals of the
Roller Skating Contest conducted annually by the Park Department for both
children and adults will take place at the Circle Lawn roller skating rink,
106th Street and Central Park West, Manhattan, Saturday, October 29th at 2:30
P.M.

      The following are the events of the program:

                                 Boys                Girls

Under 9 years of age           40 yard dash

4'8" and under                 60 yard dash            40 yard dash

5'3" and under                100 yard dash            60 yard dash

Over 5'3"                     220 yard dish           100 yard dash

Unlimited                     220 yard dash           100 yard dash

      The first, second and third place winners of each event in the borough
eliminations held recantly will be eligible to compete in the finals on
October 29th.

      Gold and silver aodals will be awarded to the winners and runners-up of
the finals respectively and bronze medals to each of the borough finalists.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 25, 1938


               The Park Department, on Wednesday, October 26th at llsOO A.M.,
will hold its Fifth Annual Review of its Civil Service personnel, on the
Sheep Meadow, which lies batween 66th and 69th Streets oast of the West
Drive in Contral Park.

               The Queens Borough forces, which won the award for appearance
and record during the year 1937, will be in the front rank.  Competition
for this honor is much keener this aeason than in former years inasmuch as
the winning borough will roeeivo a largo plaque as an award of merit.

               The inspection will be a routine affair, giving the Mayor and
the park executives an opportunity to look over the combined forces.

               As a skeleton force must be loft in the parks, particularly to
operate comfort stations, playgrounds, revenue produoing facilities and
borough offices, approximately 3,000 of the regular Civil Service maintenance
and operation force will be present.  Included in the ranks will be foremen,
laborers, mechanics, gardeners, climbers and prunors and men and women
playground directors.

                Mayor LaGuardia will not only present the plaque but also
individual awards to that member of the supervisory force who has made the
best record for efficiency in each of the five boroughs.

                In connection with the review and as part of the ceremony,
John S. Morgan, a park employee who intends to retire at the end of the year,
will review the personnel to honor his 36 years of faithful service in the
Department of Parks.

                                    E N D

OCTOBEE 25, 1938

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          Individual Award to Employee in
          Each Borough Showing Best Results
          for the Past Year.


l.   Beatrice N, Elger                        98%
                         Richmond

2.   Mark Fitzgerald                          87%
                         St. James Park
                         Bronx

3.   Thomas A. O'Hare                         84%
                         Harlem Housing
                         Playground
                         Manhattan

4.   Richard A. Sharp                         83%
                         Triborough Bridge
                         Playground
                         Queens

5.   Christopher A. Stokes                    76%
                        Bill Brown Memorial
                        Playground
                        Brooklyn

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            October 26, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that chrysanthemums at the
Conservatory Garden in Central Park, Fifth Avenue and 105 Street, are now at
their best.  There are about five thousand (5000) chrysanthemums in bloom
which are exceptionally good this year on account of the fine fall weather.

                The varieties in bloom are:

                    Ruth Cummings               Yellow Normandie

                    Barbara Cummings            October Girl

                    Early Bronze                Lillian Doty

                    Frances Whottlcscy          Joan Cummings

                    Apollo                      Captain Cook

                    Coroanum                    Articum

                    Nipponicum                  October Dawn


                They are all hardy types and similar types can be grown in
any garden or yard where the soil is good.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            November 4, 1938


             The Department of Parks announces the opening of their annual
chrysanthemum show on November 5th at 10 A.M. at the Prospect Park
Greenhouses in Prospoct Park, Brooklyn, noar Prospect Park West and Ninth
Street.

             A very attractive display of over 4000 individual plants will be
on exhibition with over 5000 blooms of various colors. Various types of
chrysanthemums are used, such as the large Japanese varieties, also Pompons,
Anemone, Miniature, Cascade and hardy types so arranged to set off the
coloring to the best advantage.

             The exhibition will be open free to the public
every day from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M, for three weeks.

                                  - E N D -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            November 5, 1938


         The Department of Parks announces the final tournament for caddies
at Mosholu Golf Course on Tuesday, November 8th at 2 P.M.


         This will be an eighteen holj match play, with Vincent McBride,
Mortimer Janko, Vincent Pilerio and William Crosborough, winners of four
former elimination tournaments being the finalists.  The contestants will
compete for the Andrew Clancy Memorial Cup, donated by Frank Clancy, the golf
professional at the Mosholu Golf Course. This cup must be won twice by any
caddy to become his permanent trophy. A gold medal will also be presented to
the winner of this final tournament.

                                     END

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            November 7, 1938


              The Department of Parks announces that bids were taken today
for the erection of one of the famous Vanderbilt gates at the entrance to the
Conservatory Gardens at 104th Street and Fifth Avenue in Central Park, The
gate is a gift from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and has been accepted on
behalf of New York City by Park Commissioner Moses.

              The ornamental portal was one of a pair designed by George B.
Post in 1894 for the mansion of Cornelius Vanderbilt at Fifth Avenue and 58th
Street.' The gates were fabricated in Paris of wrought iron with scroll work
and ornamentation of cast bronze.  The refinement of the design and the care
used in the choice of materials and workmanship gave distinction to the
Vanderbilt chateau on Fifth Avenue and typified the glories of the mauve
decade.  The gates were preserved anu placed in storage when the mansion was
demolished in 1928.

              Mrs. Whitney's generous offer to restore and erect the gates on
city property has been the subject of study by the Park Department for the
past three years. The ideal site was finally discovered at the entrance to
the new Conservatory Gardens at 104th Street.  The gate will open up and
suitably enframe the fine view into the gardens and restore to Fifth Avenue a
familiar landmark. Proximity to the Museum of the City of New York diagonally
across the Avenue, lends an added propriety to the choice of location.

              With the northern advance of business along Fifth Avenue it was
inevitable that the stately mansions would pass out of the picture, generally
with only photographs as visual evidence to support the stories which relate
the colorful parts they have played in the creation of the city.  Through the
Vanderbilt gates have passed the most famous persons of the early twentieth
century.  Through a happy combination of generous owner and appreciative
administrator those gates are to return to Fifth Avenue to remain for
posterity as a record and reminder of the art of the mauve era.

             The work of re-erecting the gate and a portion of the old
Vanderbilt wrought iron fence is scheduled to begin early in November and
should be completed by January 15, 1939.

                                  - E N D -


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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            November 7, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that bids were taken today
on the first three contracts to be let for the construction of the
Circumferential Parkway, the new thirty-five mile artery which will run from
Owl's Head, Brooklyn to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge Plaza, Queens.

                All bids taken today were in the Shore Parkway erection of
the Project which runs from Owl's Head Park to Aqueduct, Queens. It is
interesting to note that these contracts have been prepared, approved
by several city agencies and by the Public Works Administration, have
been advertised and bids received in a lapsed time of three weeks since
since the final approval of the P.W.A. grant.

                The first proposal was for the con truction of the
substructure of the Plumb Beach Channel Bridge and the placing of hydraulic
fill through Marine Park, Brooklyn, extending from the terminus of Emmons
Avenue to Flatbush Avenue at the northwest corner of Floyd Bannett
Airport. Five bids wore received and the three low bidders were:


       ARUNDEL CORPORATION                                       $822,362.50

        NATIONAL EXCAVATION CORPORATION                           911,445.00

        FREDERICK SNARE CORPORATION                               932,518.70

                The second proposal taken was for the placing of fill,
grading and construction of a rip rap bulkhead from Fort Hamilton to Bay
Parkway along the shore of Gravesond Bay, Brooklyn, Four bids were received
and the three low bidders were:

        STANDARD DREDGING CORPORATION                            $724,314.00

        GAHAGAN CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION                          740,410.00

        J. M. HAZELL CO                                           959,440.00


                The third bid taken today was for the placing of fill from
Flatbush Avenue to the Aqueduct intersection of the Shore Parkway with
Southern Parkway.      This section will carry the Circumferential Parkway
through the marshes of the north shore of Jamaica Bay. Four bids were
received on this proposal and the three low bidders were:

        GAHAGAN CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION                         $958,500.00

        AMERICAN DREDGING CORPORATION                           1,019,505.00

        ATLANTIC GULF AND PACIFIC COMPANY                       1,050,350.00

              Work on all these contracts will start within two weeks.

               The Circumferential Parkway will be built at a total cost of
approximately $28,000,000., $18,000,000. of which is being financed through a
P.W.A. grant and the remaining $16,000,000, by the city.

               The three contracts on which bids were received today are the
first of over two hundred which must be let for completion by July 1st,
1940. The future contracts will comprise filling, grading, drainage, paving,
lighting, landscaping and the construction of over sixty grade elimination
bridges and pedestrian overpasses in connection with the thirty-five miles of
new parkway along which, following the precedent already established on the
Henry Hudson Parkway, the East River Drive, and the Triborough Bridge
Approaches, there will be intensive neighborhood recreational development.

               Work on all of these contracts will be started within the
next two weeks.

                                   - END -

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                            November 9, 1938


                The Department of Parks announces that it took bids today on
the fourth contract on the Circumferential Parkway Project.

                Four firms submitted bids for filling for the Cross Island
Parkway section between Northern Boulevard and Fort Totten, along the shore
of Little Neck Bay.

                The three low bidders were:


        C0NSTRUCTION AGGREGATE CORPORATION.         $ 737,415

        NATIONAL EXCAVATION CORPORATION               888,250

        GAHAGAN CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION...           986,600

                This is the fourth bid taken this week on this thirty-five
mile parkway project, which is being financed by the City with the aid of a
$12,000,000. P.W.A. grant. Three were submitted on Monday for filling in the
Gravesend Bay, Marine Park and Jamaica Bay sectors of the Shore Parkway
section* All this work will be commenced by the contractors within two weeks.

                                    -END-

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           November 10, 1938


                  The Department of Parks announces that the city wide finals
of the "Whistling Contest" will take place at Mullaly Recreation Building,
Jerome Avenue and 165th Street, Bronx, Sunday, November 13th at 2:30 P.M.

                 This is the first time that the Park Department has included
a contest for whistlers in its varied and comprehensive recreation program.
Tlie competitors are restricted to the use of finders or lips in the
rendition of their selections.

                 The classification of songs or tunes permitted in the contest
and the age group for each classification, with separate divisions for
boys and girls, are as follows:

                                    Classification          Age Group

1.   Whistling soloists (classical, semi-classical         Under 18 years and

                               and popular songs)          over 18 years

2.   Whistling novelties                                   Under 18 years and

                                                           over 18 years

3.   Bird Call Imitators                                   Under 16 years and

                                                           over 16 years

             There will be a separate division for boys and girls under 8
years of age and for man and women over 30 years of age all of whom are
eligible to enter any of the classifications.

             The winner of each classification in the borough eliminations,
which Lave been held during the past three weeks, will qualify for the
finals at Mullaly on November 13th.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           November 10, 1938


              It was disclosed at one of the "borough contests that a number
of youngsters ranging from 5 to 14 years of age have neither seen a canary
nor heard one sing.  This contest will give the underprivileged youth of our
city an opportunity to keep abreast of their rural contemporaries by
educating them in the melodious tunes of rare birds.

              Each of the borough competitions has elicited wide response.
The contestants came out in large numbers and strove keenly for the right to
represent their borough at the finals.  Enthusiastic audiences greeted them
in every borough and it is expected that tne followers of the numerous
entrants will fill Mullaly Recreation Building to capacity next Sunday
afternoon.

              Gold and silver medals will be awarded to the winner and
runner-up in each of the three classifications and bronze medals to the
remaining borough finalists.  Tne National Association of Audubon Societies
dedicated to the protection of wild birds and animals in America will donate
three special prizes to the winners of the division for "Bird Call
Imitators".

              The following persons, prominent in the radio and whistling
world, have consented to act as judges: Lew Olsen, professional whistler and
originator of the Whistling Contest, Kick Kenny, Radio Editor of the Daily
Mirror, Henry Boyd, official bird whistler for the Columbia Broadcasting
oystem, Fred Lowry, whistling specialist of Vincent Lopez's band, and Roger
Tory Peterson of the Audubon Society.

              As an added feature on the program for the finals on November
13th the expert whistlers among the judges have agreed to demonstrate their
talent by whistling a few songs or tunes typifying each of the
classifications.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           November 7, 1938

                The Department of Parks announces the final tournament for
caddies at Mosholu Golf Course on Tuesday, November 8th at 2 P.M.

                This will be an eighteen hole match play, with Vincent
McBride, Mortimer Janko, Vincent Pilerio and William Crosborough, winners of
four former elimination tournaments being the finalists. The contestants will
compete for the Andrew Clancy Memorial Cup, donated by Frank Clancy, the golf
professional at the Mosholu Golf Course.  This cup must be won twice by any
caddy to become his permanent trophy. A gold medal will also be presented to
the winner of this final tournament.

                                  - E N D -

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                      LONG ISLAND STATE PARK COMMISSION
                           BELMONT LAKE STATE PARK
                            BABYLON, L. I., N. Y.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL C.H. BLAKELOCK AT BABYLON 1OOO OR BABYLON 1178


FOR RELEASE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1938:

             Work will be completed next month on the pavement, approaches
and bridges of the new 10 mile Northern-Wantagh State Parkway Extension
project in Nassau County which was originally scheduled to be opened to
traffic early next spring.  Mild fall weather has been a contributing factor
in the completion of this $4,400,000 parkway project nearly three months
ahead of schedule.

             Arrangements are being made for a formal dedication to be held
on Saturday, December 17th, at which time it is expected that Governor
Herbert H. Lehman; Commissioner of Highways, Arthur Brandt; Nassau County
Executive, J. Russel Sprague; and Commissioner Robert Moses will be the
principal speakers.

             The project, which embodies all the known features of modern
parkway design tending toward safe and efficient operation of motor vehicles
under attractive conditions, begins at the present easterly terminus of the
Northern State Parkway at Glen Cove Road, extends through the Village of
Westbury to Union Avenue and then turns south to connect with the completed
Wantagh State Parkway to Jones Beach State Park at its junction with the
Southern State Parkway.

              The new Northern-Wantagh State Parkway Extension project
provides a direct parkway route, 4-3 miles in length, free of all grade
crossings and stoplights, from Manhattan and the Bronx via the Triborough
Bridge, and from Brooklyn via Interborough Parkway, to eastern
Long Island and Jones Beach State Park on the Atlantic Ocean.

            The construction of the new parkway has been progressed, by the
State Department of Public Works in cooperation with the Long Island State
Park Commission.

                                    END.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
nn
                                                      ALLYN R. JENNINGS
ROBERT MOSES                       (seal)              GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
COMMISSIONER                                          WILLIAM H. LATHAM
                                                        PARK ENGINEER
                                                      JAMES A. DAWSON
                                                        SENIOR PARK DIRECTOR
                             November 21, 1938        JAMES A. SHERRY
                                                        CHIEF CLERK
                                      
                            THE CITY OF NEW YORK     
                            DEPARTMENT OF PARKS      
                                  ARSENAL            
                        64TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 
                                CENTRAL PARK         
                               NEW YORK CITY         


                              NOTICE TO EDITORS
               NO RELEASE UNTIL WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 23

          There will be a meeting tonight (Tuesday, November 22} at 8*30
P.M. in the Lecture Room of the Roosevelt Wing of the American Museum of
Natural History, 80th Street and Central Park West.  The purpose of the
meeting is the presentation of the plan of Park Commissioner Moses for
Housing and Recreation to carry out the intent of Constitutional Amendment
Number Four recently adopted by the people. The meeting is sponsored by the
following groups:

                 The Citizens' Housing Council
                 The Park Association of New York
                 The New York Building Congress
                 The Metropolitan Association of
                     Real Estate Boards
                 The Associated Architects of New York City

          Commissioner Moses will speak along the lines indicated in the
attached report and those listed on the attached program will discuss his
plan.

          Seats in the front of the Lecture Room will be reserved
for the press.


                                      (Allyn R. Jennings signature)
                                      General Superintendent
Attachs.

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                      MEETING ON HOUSING AND RECREATION

                              THE LECTURE ROOM
                               ROOSEVELT WING
                   THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
                      CENTRAL FARK WEST AT 80TH STREET

                         TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1938
                                AT 8:30 P.M.


                                   PROGRAM

                         RADIO WNYC   - 8:30-10 P.M.


8:30   P.M.    Mr. Harold S. Buttonheim, President
                   Citizens' Housing Council of New York - Chairman

8:33   P.M.    Honorable Robert Moses, Commissioner
                   Department of Parks

9:16   P.M.    Honorable Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President
                   State Constitutional Convention

9:20   P.M.    Honorable Paul Y/indcls, Delegate
                   State Constitutional Convention

9:24   P.M.    Gustavus Town Kirby, Esq., Vice President
                   lark Association of New York City, Inc.

9:28   P.M.    Honorable Louis H. Pink, Chairman
                   Now York State Board of Housing

9:32   P.M.    Honorable Raymond V. Ingersoll, President
                   Borough of Brooklyn

9:36   P.M.    Mr. Clarke G. Dailoy, Chairman
                   Metropolitan Association of Real Estate Boards

9:40   P.M.    Honorable Stanley M. Isaacs, President
                   Borough of Manhattan

9:44   P.M.    Mr. Thomas S. Holden, President
                   New York Building Congress, Inc.

9:48   P.M.    Mrs. Samuol I. Rosenman, Chairman
                   Housing Committee of the United Neighborhood Houses

9:52   P.M.     Honorable Joseph C. Baldwin, Councilman
                    Borough of Manhattan

9:56-10 P.M.    Honorable Rexford G. Tugwell, Chairman
                    City Planning Commission

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The Department of Parks announces that the ten municipal golf courses will
close at the end of the day, Wednesday, November 30th.  To keep them open
beyond this date with the alternate freezing and thawing, would be injurious
to the courses and cause bare spots to show up on the greens which could not
be rehabilitated by the opening of the courses next Spring.  The small demand
at this time is another factor which determines the closing date of the golf
courses, as they, as well as other revenue producing facilities, under the
jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, are run on a self-sustaining basis
which requires the income to be sufficient to pay the cost of maintenance and
operation.  During this season, through November 25th, there have been
602,895 rounds of golf played over the various courses, which is an increase
of 102,895 rounds over last year.  The following is the number of rounds
recorded at each of the ten courses through November 25th:


                      Van Cortlandt . . . . .     55,849
                       Mosholu                    67,534
                       Pelham                     59,683
                       Split Rock                 40,338
                       Clearview                  63,211
                       Kissena . . . . . . . .    65,246
                       Forest Park                68,747
                       Dyker Beach                88,315
                       Silver Lake                51,074
                       LaTourette                 42,898

         With this tremendous play over the courses, it has been difficult to
keep them in playing condition with the money allowed at present for their
maintenance and operation.  With the change in fees next year, it is thought
that there will be more moneys available to buy additional supplies, material
and equipment for the courses and to increase the number of men assigned to
oach course.  This change will eliminate the $3. season junior permit and the
$10. senior permit.  There will be but one pormit, a $5. seasonal permit,
good on any of the ten courses from Monday to Friday, inclusive.  These
permits are also good on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, with an additional
fee of $.50 per round.  The daily fees will remain the same, $.75 for week
days and $1. for Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

                                * * * * * * *

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                                                                SUNDAY PAPERS
DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           December 4, 1938

                  The Park Department announced today that the Court of
Appeals, in a decision of November 29, has upheld the policy of the Municipal
Civil Service Commission in requiring the City's life guards to take
practical and physical tests to determine their ability to perform their
duties. The decision stated that their fitness could only be ascertained in
this manner.

                  Under the new City Charter, the jurisdiction of Coney
Island, Rockaway and South Beach, Staten Islands previously under the
jurisdiction of the various Borough Presidents, was given to the Park
Department, With this transfer, it was found that many of the life guards
were on preferred Civil Service lists of the various Borough Presidents'
offices, and as a great number of them had held the position for so many
years that Park Department questioned their present fitness, the Civil
Service Commission was asked to hold physical and practical examinations, so
as to safeguard the public using the beaches. This was agreed to and on May
9th the Commission ordered a qualifying examination. About two hundred men,
all of whom had been guards for from six to fifteen years on the City
beaches, refused to take the test, and went to the Supreme Court to compel
the Civil Service Commission to certify the lifeguard preferred list.  On May
27th, Justice Rosenman, in handing down a decision that the Commission did
not have the right to require the tests, strongly urged that changes should
be made in existing regulations, so as to require all life guards to pass
periodic practical tests. The Corporation Counsel appealed the case for the
City, resulting in the above-mentioned decision by the Court of Appeals.

                  The greater proportion of the former guards having refused
to submit to tests, the Civil Service Commission ordered a new examination,
and qualified over three hundred men who were immediately assigned to duty
and whoso record of lifesaving along the twelve miles of City beach under
their supervision was the most outstanding in recent years.

                  This decision, in upholding the prudent requirements of the
Civil Service Commission, represents signal success for the Corporation
Counsel of the City, who has defended the Commission in this action from the
start.

                  A copy of the decision is attached.

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[DUPLICATE COPY OF PREVIOUS RELEASE]

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(DECISION)


    In the Matter of LEOPOLD V. ROSSI; Petitioner, Appellant and Respondent,
       v. ROBERT MOSES, As Commissioner of Parks, Defendant, and PAUL J.
       KERN ot al., Members and Constituting the Municipal Civil Service
       Commission of the City of Now York, Defendants, Respondents and
       Appellants.

       (Decided November 29, 1938)

       CROSS-APPEALS from an order of the Appellate Division, first
       department, affirming an order of Special Term.

       LEOFOLD V, ROSSI in person, for petitioner, appellant and respondent.

       WILLIAM C, CHANLER, CORPORATION COUNSEL (SAMUEL J. SILVERMAN AND
    PAXTON BLAIR of counsel), for defendants, respondents and appellants0


   O'BRIEN, J.  In the year 1927 petitioner passed an open competitive
examination for the position of municipal lifeguard and was appointed to that
position which embraces only "temporary employment for seasonal work". Each
year, when the bathing season at the beaches had expired, petitioner was
notified that his services were terminated and that his name would be placed
upon the preferred list of suspended employees and made eligible for
re-employment. Since the termination of his services for the 1937 season, his
name has been upon the eligible list. He has received notice from the
Municipal Civil Service Commission to submit to an examination for a medical
and physical test and to report for a practical test to swim fifty yards in
thirty-five seconds. Petitioner refused to submit to the new examination and
the relief which he demands is that the examination be canceled and that the
Municipal Civil Service Commission certify the names of persons on the
preferred list for lifeguards in accordance with their standing on the list.
The courts below have decided that petitioner is obliged to submit to a
physical examination in accordance with section 14 of the Civil Service Law
(Cons, Laws, ch. 7) but is not required to undergo the practical swimming
tost. He has once passed en open competitive examination for the position of
lifeguard but that examination occurred ten years ago, A physical examination
for the peculiar position to which petitioner seeks to be restored must
necessarily include not only in examination in respect to a generally sound
condition of his body, but also such a physical condition as is directly
related to the duties to be performed by him as a lifeguard. He might, in a
general sense, be free from illness or disease, but after the passage of ten
years time be unable, physically, to perform the duties of lifeguard.  The
physical tost of his ability to act as lifeguard includes not only general
physical health but also such a condition of bodily strength as would enable
him to rescue drowming persons on the municipal beaches. We think, therefore,
that the provisions of section 14 of the Civil Service Law, empowering the
Civil Service Commission to "refuse to certify an eligible who is physically
so disabled as to be rendered unfit for his performance of the duties of the
position to whidh he seeks appointment," applies to a prospective appointee
to the position of lifeguard.  The physical qualification of petitioner to
perform the duties of lifeguard can be determined not only by the physical
test which the Civil Service Commission has proscribed.  Physical ability to
perform the duties of this position can be ascertained in no other way.

          The orders should be modified by reversing so much of the order as
directs defendants not to roquire petitioner to take and pass the practical
tost as a condition of certifying him for appointment to the position of
lifeguard and as so modified affirmed, with costs to the appellant. The
motion by the defendants, respondents and appellants, to dismiss the appeal
taken by the petitioner should be denied.

          CRANE, CH. J., HUBBS, LOUGHRAN, FINCH AND RIPPEY, JJ.,

concur;   LEHMAN, J., taking no part.

          Ordered accordingly.

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 12, 1938

         The Department of Parks announces that bids were received today for
the fifth contract to be let on the Circumferential Parkway, which is being
financed by the City of New York with the aid of a Public Works
Administration grant of #12,000,000.

         The work to be done under this contract includes the construction of
two bridges over the Parkway, one at Farmers Boulevard, and the other at New
York Boulevard, as well as the grading, drainage and paving of the parkway
drives and the south service road.

         This section of the Circumferential Parkway is a good example of
coordination of work done under various agencies.  The north service road now
being used by traffic was built by the State Department of Public Works in
1937.  The rough grading of the area included in today's contract was done by
the WPA under the supervision of the Department of Parks during this last
summer.  The plans and specifications for this present contract were prepared
for the Department of Parks by the State Department of Public Works and the
construction work will be inspected by engineers from the same department.

           Twelve contracting firms bid on this constract.  The three low
bidders were;

         Poirer & McLane Corporation           $ 645,608.45
         33 West 42 Street, N.Y.

         Carmine Pettracca                       654,418.10
         Hollis, Long Island

         Johnson Drake & Piper                   664,685.30
         Freeport, long Island

                                    #####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 13, 1938

                                Winter Sports


            The Department of Parks announces an extensive program of winter
sports activities including carnivals, skiing, ice skating and coasting.  In
addition to the lakes used for ice skating in the larger parks, 106 wading
pools will be flooded and 15 tennis courts will be sprayed. Five winter sport
carnivals wil2 be held on Jan. 8th, at Victory Field, Myrtle Avenue &
Woodhaven Boulevard, Queens; Van Courtlandt Park Lake, near West 242nd St.,
Bronx; Conservatory Lake, Central Park near 72nd Street & Fifth Avenue,
Manhattan; Prospect Park Lake near Empire Boulevard & Lincoln Road, Brooklyn;
Clove Lakes near Victory Boulevard & Clove Road, Richmond.  There will be
featured at these carnivals, events for juveniles, juniors and
seniors. Exhibition of figure, pair and novelty skating will form part of the
program. As a fitting climax to the borough carnivals, a monster winter
sports carnival will be held on January 15th at the Conservatory Lake,
Central Park. All those who won in the respective borough carnivals will be
permitted to enter the final championships.

            In the event of snow, a contest in snow sculpture and snow
architecture vjlll be held on Saturday, January 21st at 2 P.M.  Last year
3,000 competed in this novel contest and it is expected that there will be
many more entries in 1939. Medals will be awarded to all winners of the
winter sports carnivals and also to the winners of the contest in snow
sculpture and snow architecture.

         The attached list designates the respective areas for ice skating,
skiing and coasting.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              CITY OF NEW YORK
                             DEPARTMENT OF PARKS

            ICE SKATING, COASTING AND SKIING AREAS     1938-1939

                           M A N H A T T A N

                               ICE SKATING

LAKES

Central lark
  Conservatory Lake - 72nd Street
  59th Street Lake
  72nd Street Lake
  110th Street Lake

WADING POOLS

Carl Schurz Playground - Bast 84th to 89th Sts. & East River
Carmnnsville Playground - Amsterdam Avenue & West 151st Street
Chelsea Park Playground - West 27th to West 28th St. & 9th Avenue
Colonial Playground - West 145th St. & Edgecombe Avonue
Columbus Park Playground - Baxter & Park Streets
Fort Tryon Playground - Riverside Drive to Broadway & Dyckman Street
Great Lawn Playground - Central Park
Gulick Playground - Sheriff & Delan6ey Streets
Hamilton Fish Playground - Pitt & Houston Sts.
Highbridge Playground - 167th Street
Jay Hood Wright Playground - 175rd St. & Ft, Washington Avenue
John Jay Playground - East 76th to 78th Sts. & East River
Kelly Memorial Playground - West 17th St, between 8th & 9th Aves.
Lewis & Rivington Playground
Lillian Wald Playground - Cherry & Monroe Streets
McOray Playground - West 158th St, between 5th & Lenox Avenues
Mt. Morris Playground - 120th to 124th Streets & Madison Avenue
Playground - 150th St. & 5th Avenue
Riverside Drive Playgrounds
   West 74th Street
   West 96th Street
Rumsey Playground - Central Park
St. Gabriel's Playground - East 55th to 56th Sts., 1st & 2nd Aves.
St. Nicholas - West 141st St. & St. Nicholas Avenue
Sara Delano Roosevelt, 2 & 5 - Chrystie & Forsythe Streets
Sauer Playground - East 12th St. between Ave. A & Ave. B
Thomas Jefferson Playground - East 111th to 114th Sts. & 1st Avenue
Tompkins Square Playground - 7th to 10th Sts., Avo. A to Ave. B
85 Roosevelt St. Playground
95 Thompson St. Playground
104th Street & East River Drive
 119th St & East River Drive

TENNIS COURTS

York Avenue & 63rd Street
93rd St. - Central Park

COASTING

Central Park
  Burn's Lawn - 79th St. & West Drive
  Cedar Hill - South of 79th St., Transverse Rd. & Erst Drive
  East Meadow - 99th St. off 5th Avenue - Small children
  Pilgrim Hill - 72nd St. off 5th Avenue
  60th St. & 7/0st Drive
  70th St. & West Drive
  72nd St. - North of Boat House
  83rd St. & East Drive
Inwood Park
Fort Tryon Park

                                  BROOKLYN

                                 ICE SKATING

LAKES

Prospect Park

WADING POOLS

Avenue L & East 17th Street Playground
Bay Parkway & nVuiiuo Playground
Bedford .avenue & avenues X & Y Playground
Bushwick Park - Knickerbocker & Irving Avenues
Carroll Park - President & Court Streets
Crispus Attucks - Fulton Street L Classon avenue
Dahill Road & 38th Street Ilayground
Dreier-Offerman - Bay 46th St. & Cropsey Avenue
Fort Greene Playground - Myrtle Avenue & St. Edwards St
Ft. Hamilton & 52nd Street Ilayground
Hockschor Playground - Linden St. & Central Avenue
Howard, Pacific & Dean Playground
James J. Byrno Memorial - 3rd St. & 4th Avenue
Lafayette & Reid Playground
La Guardia Playground - South 5th St. & Havemeyer St.
Leiv Eiriksson - 66th &, 67th Sts. & 4th Avenue
McCarron Park - Driggs Avnnue & Lorimor Street
McKibbin Playground - White & McKibbin Streets
McLaughlin Park - Tillary & Jay Streets
Neptune & West 25th Street Playground
New Utrecht & 70th Street Playground
Ocenn Parkway & Avenue P Playground
Owl's Head, Colonial Road & 57th Street
Pitkin & New Jersrey Avenues J Playground
Prospect & Greenwood Avenues
Red Hook Pool Playground - Pioneer & Dwight Streets
S. A. Rudd Playground - Aberdeenn Street near Bushwick avenue
Schermerhern & 3rd Streets
Sheridan Playground - Grand Street near Wythe avenue
South 3rd & Berry Streets
Stillwell & Avenue U
Taaffe Place & Park Avenue
Tompkins Park - Tompkins & Greene Avenues.
Union & Van Brunt Streets
Vandervoort & Cherry Streets

                                 COASTING

Prospect Park
  Endale Arch Hill - Lincoln Road & Ocean Avenuo Entrance
  Hill Southeast of 1st Street
  Prospoct Park West - 3rd St. & Prospect Park W. Entrance
  Southwest of Maryland Memorial - 15th St. & Prospoct Park W. Entrance
  Southwest of Music Stand - Empire Boulevard Entrance;
  Sugar Bowl Hill - 9th St. & Prospect Park W. -Entrance
  Tennis House Hill - 9th St. & Prospoct Park W. Entrance
  Well House Drive - Vandebilt Street Entrance of Prospect Park

                                  SKIING

Prospect Park
  Southwest of Music Stand - Empire Boulevard Entrance
  Sugar Bowl Hill - 9th St. & Prospect Park W. Entr nee
  Tennis House Hill - 9th St. & Prospect Park W. Entrance

                                BRONX

                              ICE SKATING
LAKES

Crotona - Crotona Park E. & East 173rd Street
Van Courtlandt - 242nd Street & Broadway

WADING POOLS

CauldwEll avenue Playground
Cedar & Sedgwick Avenues
Ciccarone Playground - East 183th St. & Hughes Ave.
Croton Parrk E. & Charlotte Street
Crotona Park S. & East 173rd Street
Devoe - W. 188th St. & University Avenue
Mullaly - E. 165th St. & Jerome Avenue
St. Mary's West - E. 147th St. & St. Ann's Avenue
Stebbins Avenue & 167th Street
Van Courtlandt south - 240th St. & Broadway
Williamsbridge - East 208th St. & Bainbridge avenue
Zimmerman - Olinville Avenue & Britton Street
141st St. & Brook Avenue
166th St. & Morris Avenue
182nd St. & Belmont Avenue

TENNIS COURTS

St. James - E 191st St. & Jerome Avenue
Williamsbridge - E. 208th St. & Bainbridge Avenue
Woodlawn - E. 233rd St. & Jerome Avenue

                                       COASTING

Bronx River Parkwny & W. 226th Street
Claremont Park - Clay Avenue
Grotona Park - Marmion Avenue & Crotona Park North
18th Tee & Fairway of Van Courtlandt Golf Course

                                         SKIING

18th Tee & Fairway of Van Courtlandt Golf Course

                                      Q U E E N S

                                   I C E  S K A T IN G


Alley Pond - Winchester Blvd. & Horace Harding Blvd.
Baisley - 116th Avenue a 155th Street
Bowno - 29th Avenue 6c 156th Street
Brookvillo - 149th Avenue & 216th Street
Capt. Tilly Park - 165th St., Highland to 85th Avenues.
Crocheron - 35th Avenue &, 214th Place
Jackson Pond - 108th St. 6c Myrtle Avenue
Kissena Park - Oak Avenue & Eissona Boulevard
Linden - 41st Avenue & 103rd Street
Pea Pond(Horace Harding) - Alley Pond Park
Oakland Lake(Alley Pond) - 212th St. & Northern Boulevard
Twin Ponds - Brookville Park

WADING POOLS

Benninger - Madison St. & Fresh Fond Road
Brookvillo - 149th Avenue, East of 216th Street
Corona 111 - 47th Avenue & 111th Street
Dry Harbor - 80th St. & Myrtle Avenue
Highland Lower - Jamaica Avenue & Elton St.
Jackson Heights - 84th St. & 30th Avenue
Jackson Pond - 108th St. & Myrtle Avenue
Jamaica 179 Place - Jamaica Avenue & 179 I lace
Junction Blvd. - Junction Blvd., 34th uvc., 96th St.
Juniper Valley - Dry Harbor Road & 62nd Street
Liberty Park - Liberty Avenue & 172nd Street
Liberty 102nd Street
Martins Field - 46th Avenue & 164th Street
Newton - 56th Avenue & 92nd St.
O'Connoll - 113th Avenue & 196th Street
Thompson Hill - 47th Avenue &. 43rd Street
Tri 66B - Hoyt Avenue & 21st Street
Tri 66F - Hoyt Avenue & 29th Street
Van Wyck - 111th Avenue & 134th Street
Von Dohlon - 138th St. & Archer Avenue
Windmuller - 52nd St. & Woodsido Avenue

TENNIS COURTS

Alley Pond - Grand Central Parkway, Northern Boulevard
Brookville - Brookville Boulevard, S. Conduit Highway
Crocheron - 215th Place, 33rd Avenue, Bayside
Cunningham - Union T'kpc, N. of 193rd Street
Highland - Jamaica Avenue, Cleveland Street
Liberty Park - Liberty Avenue & 172nd Street
Tri 66A - Hoyt Ave., 19 to 21st St.
Tudor Field - N. Conduit J.vonue, 80th Street
Woodhaven - 89th Avenue and 90th St., Woodhaven

FLOODED & SPRAYED AREAS

Alley Pond Picnic Grove (natural area, wetted snow, rains)
Jackson Heights Softball Field
Jacob Riis lark - Riis Park, Rockaway, L. I.
Liberty Park Roller Skating Track
O'Conncll Handball Courts - 113th Ave. & 196th St., St. Albans, L. I,
Victory Field - Woodhavon Boulevard & Myrtle - Avenue

                                 COASTING

Alley Pond Park (Grand Central Parkway to Northern Blvd., 233rd St.)
  Hill at Parking Field
  Hill from road to Athletic Field
  Motor Parkway, Horace Harding Blvd. to Winchester Blvd., Hollis, L. I.
Chisholm Park
  Hill from Mansion into baseball field, Poppenheusen Avc., East River.
  College Point, L. I.
Grocheron Park
  38th Ave., beginning at 215th St., Bayside, L. I.
Forest Park
  Hill north of Tennis Courts, Park Lane South, opp. 89th St.
  T 18, Golf Course
Highland lark
  Snake Hill turn to Jamaica Avenue
Kissena lark
  Hill at rear of parking field down from garage toward woods, adjacent to
  drainage canal, 164th St., Flushing, L. I.

                                   SKIING

Alley Pond
  Motor Parkway, Horace Harding Blvd. to Winchester Blvd., Hollis, L. I.
Crocheron
   Baseball Field to 35th Avenue, Bayside, L. I.

                              R I C H M O N D

                                ICE SKATING

LAKES

Martling's (Clove Lakes Park) - Clove Road
Willowbrook lark - Richmond Avenue & Victory Boulevard
Wolf's Pond Park - Cornelia Avenue

WADINGG TOOLS

Clove Lakes Playground - Glenwood Pllace & Clove Road
De Matti Playground - Tompkins Avenue & Chestnut Lanee
McDonald Playground - Forest & Myrtle Avenue
Model Playground - Jewett & Castleton Avenues
Walker Park - Dolafield Place Y Davis Avenue

FLOODED AREA

Both Levels of larking Space at Silver Lake Golf Course

                                   COASTING

LaTourette Golf Course - Forest Hill Road
  10th Fairway
Silver Lake Golf Course - Forest Avenue & Clove Road
  5th Tee to Forest Avenue

                                    SKIING
LaTourette Golf Course
  17th Fairway
Silver Lake
  From 8th Tee to Forest Avenue
  From 9th Tee to Forest Avenue

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 18, 1938


          The contract for the erection of one of the famous Vanderbilt Gates
at the entrance to the Conservatory Gardens at 105 Street and Fifth Avenue in
Central Park was awarded today by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to Abraham
M. Goldsmith, Room 1937 Grand Central Terminal Building.  The estimated cost
of the work is #15,000.

          The gate and fence fabricated in Paris of wrought iron with scroll
work and ornamentations of cast bronze were designed by George B. Post in
1894 for the mansion of Cornelius Vanderbilt at 58 Street and Fifth Avenue.

          The gates and fence placed in storage when the mansion was
demolished in 1928 will now through the generosity of Mrs.  Whitney make a
beautiful setting for the Gardens.

          The work to be done under the supervision of the Park Department
will begin on December 19 and the erection will be completed on March 1st,
1939.

                                    ####

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 19, 1938


          The Annual Christmas Exhibit in the Department of Parks Greenhouse
in Prospect Park will be opened to the public Tuesday, December 20, 1938. The
Exhibit will consist of 5000 exceptionally fine Poinsettas in three colors,
white, pink and red.  A fine collection of other Christmas plants, such as
Begonias, Christmas Cherries, Scotch Heather, Primroses, Camellias, Bird of
Paradise, and Lemon and Orange trees in fruit will also be shown.

          Doors will be open every day from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.

          Greenhouses located at Prospect Park West between Seventh and Ninth
Streets. 

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 20, 1938


             Bids were received this morning in the Arsenal Building by the
Department of Parks for another contract on the Circumferential Parkway.

             This is the sixth contract prepared and bid on for work on this
project since the Federal grant through the Federal Emergency Administration
of Public Works was made to the city (October 10, 1938).

             The contract bid on today is for the grading, drainage and
paving on the Southern Parkway section of the Circumferential Parkway between
Arthur Street and Brookville Boulevard, Queens and for the construction of
two bridges over the parkway, one at Springfield Boulevard and the other at
225th Street.

             This operation adjoins the work on that section upon which bids
were taken on December 12th and will be of a similar nature, that is, the
construction of the south service road and the east and west bound parkway
traffic lanes. As in the last contract the plans and specifications were
prepared by the New York State Department of Public Works, which will also
supervise the construction. This section was also rough graded by the
W.P.A. last summer under the supervision of the City Park Department.

             With the completion of this job on October 1st, 1939, parkway
facilities on the Southern Parkway will be available for public use
from Baisley Boulevard to the Southern State Parkway, by way of the
completed Laurelton section.

The three low bidders were:


Petracca & Banko                    $565,358.35
187-47 Ilion Avenue
St. Albans, L. I.

Poirier & McLane, Inc.               567,576.60
33 West 42nd St.,
New York City

National Excavation Corp.            575,774.50
10 East 40th Street
New York City

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 23, 1938

            The Department of larks announces that bids were received today
on the seventh contract for work on the Circumferential Parkway.  This work
is being financed jointly by New York City and the Federal Public Works
Administration. The estimated cost of the whole project is #28,000,000 of
which the P.W.A. is furnishing #12,000,000 in the form of a grant.

                This contract covers the grading and drainage work of the
parkway from the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge approach to Fort Totten. Work on the
adjoining section, from Fort Totten to Northern Boulevard, is already under
way.

            It has been possible to prepare and take bids on these seven
contracts only because of complete cooperation on the part of P.W.A. and the
Board of Estimate in progressing this project.  With the start of
construction on this contract, work will be under way on more than one-half
of this thirty-five mile project.  The total of all seven bids on the
contracts amounts to more than $5,000,000, or 20 percent of the total job. It
was not until October 13th of this year that the Board of Estimate authorized
this construction and all of this work has been let since that time, which is
at the rate of one contract every ten days.  The whole project must be
completed by July 1, 1940, which allows only an eighteen month period for
completion of all this construction.

           The three low bidders on todays contract were:


                   S. J. Grovor and Sons, Inc.
                   Municipal Building                 $570,630.00
                   Ridgefiold, New Jersey

                   Nicholas DiMenna and Sons, Inc.
                   1521 Blondell Avenue                572,945.00
                   Bronx, New York

                   National Excavation Corporation
                   10 East 40th Street                 609,430.00
                   New York City

                                    # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                          December 23, 1938


            The Bronx Playgrounds Operetta and Orchestral Clubs, sponsored by
the Department of Parks, will give three performances next week of Gilbert
and Sullivan's perennial favorite, "Pirates of Penzance".  The opening
performance will be given at the Museum of Natural History Auditorium,
Wednesday, December 28th at 8:15 P.M., and the remaining two at Mullaly
Recreation Building Auditorium, 165th St. & Jerome Avenue, December 29th and
30th at 8:15 P.M.  It will be the first performance of the combined clubs.

            The Operetta Club organized last spring now has sixty members.
Each performance next week will have a different set of principals.  For
those who understudy the principal characters, an opportunity to play the
part is given during the second and third performances.  When it is not their
turn to take a principal role, all sing in the chorus.  The competition is
very keen and it is extremely difficult at times to select cast one, two and
three.

            The Orchestral Club was only organized two months ago with a
dozen members.  It now has a membership of thirty and they have made great
progress in a short time.  In addition to combining with the Operetta Club
they will also be heard independently during the coming year.

            The combined Clubs also publish their own newspaper called "Sharps
and Flats".

            All costumes for the production with the exception of the
principals have been made by the Playground Directors. Admission to all
performances is free.


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                                                                December 1938

                PROGRESS IN THE PARK DEPARTMENT: 1934 - 1938


            January 19, 1934, marked the consolidation of the five former
separate borough Park Departments into a single department under one
commissioner. An immediate inspection showed the City park system to be in a
generally dilapidated condition, staffed with an inadequate number of
employees, most of whom were poorly trained and undisciplined, and were
handicapped by outmoded equipment.  Recreational areas were open only five
hours a day.  Nobody turned a hand on Sunday to clean up litter left by park
visitors. The Park Department budget had reached a 7-year low.

           Without doubt the greatest achievement of the past five year
period of the park consolidation has been the increase, over three-fold, in
recreational facilities and the general rehabilitation and reconstruction of
park areas made possible by the relief program.  While the number of relief
workers in New York City parks has fluctuated since 1934, there has been a
total of 200,000 man years of labor provided to the park program.  Naturally
this figure, which is difficult to understand, has produced many improvements
of lasting benefit.

             119 playgrounds throughout the five boroughs were the heritage
of the consolidated Park Department,   Those old areas, while they were
styled playgrounds, could not, by any stretch of the imagination, compare
with the modern recreational centers built during the last five years.

             There are today 372 playgrounds, ranging from small
neighborhood plots of a quarter acre to large developments such as Macombs
Dam Park in The Bronx, Red Hook and McCarren Parks in Brooklyn, and
Randall's Island, adjacent to the East Harlem section of Manhattan, all
developed to take care of every type of recreation for both children and
adults and modern in every respect.  They are paved in great part with
surfaces that make them usable throughout the year, shaded by a profuse
planting of trees, and modern, hygienic wading pools, used for basketball in
the spring and fall and for skating in winter, have been incorporated in
their design.  100 recreational buildings have been constructed to house
toilet facilities and to provide indoor activities during inclement weather.
The needs of every age have been satisfied from the tiny playhouses and
little swings for children of pre-school age, the baseball diamonds,
handball and basketball courts for the adolescents, and the croquet lawns,
horseshoe pitching, shuffleboard and bocci courts for the adults.

             The value of the playgrounds is best proved by the startling
improvement in child welfare from 1933 to the present. In 1933 there
woro 6,269 arrests for juvenile delinquency, while this year there will
be less than 4,000.  In 1933 the total number of injuries to children on
streets in the five boroughs was 12,271, this year there will be less
than 7,000.  It must be conceded that the new playgrounds are responsible,
in large measure, for those reductions.

             New construction in old parks has produced such facilities as
the new zoos in Central and Prospect Parks and in Barrett Park, Staten
Island, the improvement of the lower reservoir site in Central Park, the
entire reconstruction of Bryant Park and Stuyvesant Park, and hundreds of
lesser projects.

            Five 18-hole and three 9-hole golf courses have been increased
to ten full size courses with three new and two completely remodelled golf
houses.    Tennis courts have been doubled in number with seven hundred
available, of which many are hard surfaced to extend materially the season
of play.

            One fairly modern but small swimming pool in Staten Island and
one totally inadequate, unsanitary and unattractive plant at Betsy Head Park
in Brooklyn supplemented, in 1934, the ocean beach of Jacob Riis park in
providing outdoor bathing facilities under the jurisdiction of the Park
Department. It is one of the tragedies of New York life, and a monument to
past indifference, waste, selfishness and stupid planning that the
magnificent boundary waters of the city have been in a large measure
destroyed for recreational purposes by haphazard industrial and commercial
development and by pollution through sewage, trade and other waste. These
conditions were frankly recognized and eleven new swimming pools, each the
last word in modern construction, were built and opened to the public in
1936.

           Jacob Riis Park, the ocean front beach on the Rockaway Peninsula,
has been completely reconstructed and its former shamefully narrow beach
more than doubled in area.  In Pelham Bay Park in The Bronx a new Orchard
Beach has risen from the haphazard ruins of the Pelham Bay Naval Training
Station, famed during the World War. Five million yards of fill topped on
the Sound side by one million yards of clean, white sand, has created this
new development on a site where formerly open water divided Hunter Island
from Rodman's Neck.  The mile-long beach and boardwalk, the bathhouse for
6500 patrons and the parking space for 8000 cars have made this area so
popular that the Park Department has, on occasion, been forced to close it
because of the excessive crowds attracted by its facilities.

              On Randall's Island the Triborough Stadium, under the shadow
of the bridge from which it obtains its name, has been the scene of varied
sports events and light opera presentations.  Its track is considered to be
one of the best in America and four worlds' records are entered on its
record books.

           In addition to the great amount of park rehabilitation and now
construction financed with relief funds, three Authorities, created by law
to afford arterial improvements, have left their imprint on the city during
the last four years, The Triborough Bridge limped along from 1927 to 1934,
the only progress made being the creation of the Authority and the
construction of the main anchorages.  From 1934 to July 11, 1936, when the
bridge was oponed by President Roosevelt, the Authority worked in close
cooperation with the Park Department so that it was really to all intents
and purposes built under Park Department auspices. It has added miles of
parkways to the city system; the East River Drive, forming the Manhattan
approach, is 1-1/2 miles long; the Queens approach, which includes the Grand
Central Parkway Extension, is 6-1/4 miles long; while The Bronx approach,
also 6-1/4 miles long, was effected by the widening and repaving of Southern
Boulevard, Whitlock Avenue and Eastern Boulevard.  The Triborough Bridge
Authority has also arranged for the financing and is supervising the
construction of the new Bronx-Whitestone Bridge with parkway approaches in
The Bronx and in Queens, where it will connect with Flushing Meadow Park,,
the site of the World's Fair of 1939. The design of this project has been
worked out by consulting engineers to the Park Department, and three park
areas are being developed adjacent to its approaches in line with the
principle adoptod by the Park Department of establishing increased local
park and recreation facilities along a free-flowing traffic artery for
motorists and of defraying the cost, where possible, by the issuing of bonds
supported by tolls.

           The Henry Hudson Parkway Authority was created in 1934 and a bond
issue of $3,100,000 was offered for sale in April, 1935, The city acquired
now right-of-way in The Bronx and through a combination of work by the
relief authorities, the Parkway Authority and the State Department of Public
Works, the 4-1/4 miles of the Henry Hudson parkway in The Bronx, was
constructed and opened in December, 1936, 6,622,869 cars, or enough to pay
the carrying charges 2-1/2 times, passed over the bridge spanning the Harlem
River from its opening date to December 31, 1937, and an extra bond issue of
$2,000,000 was arranged for an upper deck on the bridge, and for new and
widened approaches, which were completed and opened to the public in May,
1938.  Since that date a million cars a month have passed through the toll
booths.  The Marine Parkway Authority was financed through a bond issue of
$6,000,000 in 1935, and on July 3, 1937, the Marine Parkway Bridge, spanning
Rockaway Inlet, was opened to the public a year ahead of schedule, replacing
the inadequate ferry service between Brooklyn and Jacob Riis Park.

           In October, 1938,. the Henry Hudson and Marine Parkway
Authorities were combined into the Now York City Parkway Authority, which,
while maintaining and operating the established facilities, is converting
1-1/2 miles of beach slum at Rockaway into a modern seaside park and
providing a new bridge and a widened parkway to replace the irksome CrossBay
Boulevard bottle-neck at the entrance to the Rockaways.

          New parkways within the city limits have added 34 miles of modern
landscaped motor arteries to the system. Most of these parkway improvements
have been financed with state and federal funds and the work has been done
under the direct supervision of the State Department of Public Works from
plans approved by the Park Department.  The most spectacular development,
however, is the 11-mile Henry Hudson parkway, which, starting at 72nd
Street, takes the express motor traffic of the West Side Elevated Highway
from Canal Street to the Saw Mill River Parkway at the Westchester County
line. This $24,340,000 improvement, financed by Federal, State and City
funds, supplemented by N.Y.C.R.R. grade crossing money, was opened on
October 12, 1937, and permits a motorist to drive uninterrupted from Canal
Street, a block or two away from the portal of the Holland Tunnel, into
Dutchess County or across the Bear Mountain Bridge into Palisades Park.  132
new acres valued at $30,000,000 have been added to Riverside Park by filling
land under water and covering the railroad tracks, and the shabby waterfront
of the Hudson changed into a landscaped park with abundant facilities for
active recreation.

          In addition to the projects already listed, city funds have been
secured for a number of major park improvements, now actively being
progressed, such as the development which will make the Brooklyn shorefront
along the Narrows a counterpart of the West Side Improvement in Manhattan,
the work being done to supplement the relief program on Randall's Island,
reconstruction of portions of Pelham Bay and Bronx Parks in The Bronx, and
the thirty acre park lying along the East River, between Grand and 14th
Street in Manhattan, which is being constructed by the Borough President
from plans prepared by the Park Department.  The greatest project, from a
standpoint of size and importance, is the work on the basic permanent
improvements at Flushing Meadow Park, the site of the World's Fair.  Here
federal, state and city governments have combined in making $93,000,000
available for work of lasting benefit which includes the grading of the 1200
acre park, the construction of highways and parkways with their attendant
grade eliminations, the construction of storm and sanitary sewers, the
dredging of Flushing Bay and the construction of a boat basin and
bulkheading. All this work was coordinated by the Department of Parks so
that, after the Fair is over, the most modern park in the world will be the
heritage of the city.

           However, much remains to be done, both in acquisition and
construction, before the park system can be said to be anywhere near
completion. At the present time plans are being made for new arterial
parkway connections in The Bronx, and work is under way on the great 33-mile
Circumferential Parkway from 0wl's Head Park in Brooklyn to the
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge in Queens. This project, financed by a $12,000,000
P.W.A.  grant and a $16,000,000 City appropriation, financed by assessment,
will be completed July 1, 1940, and will double the present parkway mileage.
It will encircle the two boroughs with a free-moving traffic belt; will
provide connections with the lesser circumferential system around Manhattan
by the future Battery-Hamilton Avenue Tunnel and the Triborough Bridge, with
Staten Island and the New Jersey Bridges by the future Narrows Tunnel, with
Long Island by the Southern and Northern State Parkways, and with The Bronx
by the new Bronx-Whitestone Bridge.

            There have been other accomplishments. Park acreage has
increased from 14,827 to 18,830 acres.  Every square inch of land, unused or
not required by other departments of the City and valuable for playgrounds,
has been transferred through the Sinking Fund to the Park Department.
Properties eaten up by taxes and assessments have been acquired at low cost
and other lands necessary for expansion of parks and creation of parkways
have been taken by condemnation.  Also, the new charter has transferred,
from the jurisdiction of the Borough Presidents, the beaches and boardwalks
at Coney Island, Rockaway and South Beach, Staten Island; nine bath and
gymnasium buildings in Manhattan; and all malls, triangles and similar small
park areas through the City.

             The number of park employees has increased from 3075 in 1934
to the present day 7135, all uniformed and all thoroughly instructed in
their duties. This has meant a 103% rise from the $4,710,000 budget of
1934 to the $9,570,000 necessary to man the expanded facilities of today.

             The largest objectives for the remaining years of the present
administration are nearly all, in some part, under way, and attainment will
depend entirely on availability of funds, whether relief or capital funds
appropriated by the City.  In the forefront of these projects is Ward's
Island Park, which will be entirely evacuated by the State and turned over
to the City for park purposes in 1943, and where, under a scheme of orderly
transfer of inmates, agreed to by Governor Lehman, portions of the Island
are now being developed for active recreation. A ramp from the Queens
approach and a footbridge over the Harlem River will make this 177 acre
island readily accessible to the residents of Astoria and to the dense
population of East Harlem directly across the East River.  In The Bronx, the
new Soundview park, which is now being filled by the Sanitation authorities,
will provide 90 acres of needed recreational space at the mouth of the Bronx
River and at the terminus of the new Bronx Rivor Parkway Extension.  Also,
in The Bronx, much remains to be done in Van Cortlandt and Pelham Bay Parks,
for whose intensive development plans have been prepared.  In Manhattan, the
completion of the work at Inwood and Isham Parks will make this section,
from, the recreational standpoint, one of the best rounded-out in the City,
while some of the oldest parks, such as Battery, City Hall and Washington
Square will be reconstructed according to more modern standards. In Queens,
of course, the big job is to finish Flushing Meadow Park, the bulk of which
will be done within a year after the closing of the Fair. Another important
objective in this borough is the development of Jamaica Bay for recreation
purposes.  In Brooklyn, Marine Park still presonts a 1563 acre field for
development, some of which is being progressed at the present time while
other portions will be done in connection with the Circumferential Parkway
development. Also, in Brooklyn, the Canarsie Beach development will also
proceed concurrently with the construction of the Circumferential. In
Richmond, Marine Park at Great Kills will be given further impetus by
proposed government dredging operations and the new syston of parkways will
be studied and land acquired for them.

            While various governmental agencies have aided considerably in
the improvements, the general comprehensive plan for the development of the
park systen for New York City, laid out in January, 1934, has been strictly
followed without wasted effort due to overlapping jurisdiction. Every
promise made has been kept and the public has received maximum use and
benefit from a minimum of expenditure.

            The reorganized department has an efficient staff operating in a
businesslike way for the transaction of everyday business affairs. The
employees, all of whom are civil service, have their duties definitely
defined and they are performing them efficiently under the guidance of
qualified, technically trained supervisors.

         What was once a run-down inadequate neglected collection of park
properties, is new the leading coordinated, progressive park system in this
country.  Its spread of facilities and comprehensiveness amazes visitors of
other great cities or those who have been absent from the city for a period
of years.

          The Department of Parks has faced its problems honestly. However,
there remains the problem of maintenance, that is, whether the citizens of
New York City and those who live on its borders aro ready to protect and
maintain, by their conduct and purses, all these new improvements.

                                   # # #

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 13, 1939


         Thirteen contractors crossed their fingers today, Friday the 13th,
and submitted bids on the construction of three bridges on the Cross Island
section of the new Belt Parkway, The bids were opened at the Arsenal,
Headquarters of the Department of Parks, in the presence of officials of the
Public Works Administration, the Federal agency that is furnishing twelve of
the twenty-eight millions of dollars needed to construct this parkway.

             The work to be done under this contract, the eighth to be bid
since this project was approved on October 13, 1938, covers the construction
of three bridges. These three structures are within a few blocks of each
other and will solve the grade separation problems caused by the
intersection of the new parkway with the Bronx-Whitestone Parkway near the
Queens approach of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge now under construction and
due for completion in this coming May.

             Two of the bridges will be of the type of structure known as
rigid frame two-span concrete arches. Both are skew bridges, that is the
bridge roadway crosses the lower roadway at an angle. The skew angle on the
bridge at 14th Avenue which will carry two-way 14th Avenue traffic over the
Cross Island Parkway is approximately 43 degrees and 30 minutes. The angle
of the 149th Street bridge which will carry that Avenue's traffic over the
Parkway is approximately 18 degrees and 50 minutes.

             The third structure is of a type unusual in this area in that
it has three levels. The lower level will be the pavement on grade
carrying two-way traffic between the Bronx-Whitestone Parkway and the
Cross Island Parkway. The middle level carried on a single span steel
Plate girder will take the south bound traffic from the Bronx-Whitestone
Bridge to the Cross Island Parkway.  The third or upper level, also a
single span steel plate girder with approach spans of reinforced
concrete will carry north bound traffic on the Bronx-Whitestone Parkway
to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge. The middle span crosses the lower
parkway at a skew angle of approximately 56 degrees while the upper
level crosses the middle one at a skew angle of approximately 64 degrees.
The abutments and retaining walls of this structure are of stone faced
concrete supported on steel pipe piles.

        The site of this three level structure was the scene of the
dedication exercise of the new Belt Parkway participated in by Harold
A. Gray, Assistant Administrator, Federal Public Works Administration, Mayor
LaGuardia, Corumissioner Moses and other city, state and federal officials
on December 10, 1938.

        The completion date for this work is August 12th, 1939.

        The three low bidders were:

        1. Nicholas DiMenna & Sons,. Inc.      $330,651.00
           1525 Blondel Avenue, Bronx, N.Y.

        2. Tully & DiNapoli, Inc.               340,265.50
           1 Bridge Plaza
           Long Island City, N.Y,

        3. A. E. Ottavino, Inc.                 340,337.50
           Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y.

 January 13, 1939

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
ARSENAL, CENTRAL PARK                                             For Release 
TEL. REGENT 4-1000                                           January 20, 1939


                   Bids were opened today by the department of Parks, at the
Arsenal, Central Park for the construction of a Grade Separation structure
at Hillside Avenue on the Cross Island section of the New Belt Parkway.

                   This contract adds another link to the chain of
operations on this parkway being financed jointly by New York City and the
federal Public Works Administration.

                   This structure, which will carry Hillside Avenue traffic
over the Parkway is a stone faced, double-span, elliptical arch bridge, and
is the ninth contract to be bid since the Belt Parkway Project was approved
on October 13, 1938.

                   This bridge will be completed by July 1, 1939 and during
its construction traffic on both 244th Street and Hillside Avenue will be
maintained by means of adequate detours.

                   The three low bidders were:

             1. A & J Ciancuilli                       $135,191.00
                1015 Saw Mill River Road. Yonkers

             2, Boyer Construction Co.,                 140,981.75
                25 West 43rd Street, N. Y.

             3. A. Catapano                             142,682.75
                36 Ashford Street, Bklyn.

JANUARY 20, 1939

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